My Mother Could Stretch…and Stretch…a Dime! by Pam Crooks

While reading my sister filly, Phyliss Miranda’s, blog last week on being a frugal housewife, I couldn’t help being thrown back into my childhood and remembering all the countless times my own mother had to be frugal while raising babies that kept coming almost every year.  (To read Phyliss’ blog, click “1800’s Frugal Frontier Housewife”.)

Of course, it’s common knowledge most women settling in the west in the 1800’s had a tough life providing meals and clothing for their families, especially if they were homesteaders living remotely. If they couldn’t sew, knit, cook, bake, butcher stock, tend gardens, and so on, their families suffered. Lazy wasn’t an option! Ditto for women living in barely-settled towns, often with only a single mercantile or two to buy groceries and meat, provided they had working husbands or weren’t widows living on meager savings.

And granted, in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, most women lived an easier life while they stayed home with the children and their husbands worked. Many women didn’t drive yet, and even if they did, most likely did not have a second car in the household. Families were larger than they are today. Mothers didn’t have the privilege of running to the grocery store every time an ingredient was missing from her pantry. Grocery stores were small, simply stocked, probably located in the neighborhood and vastly different than the super-markets we have today.

My mother was the iconic mother of the time, just as I described above. Fortunately for us kids, she grew up on her family’s farm and was a great cook, seamstress, and a dynamo when it came to having a clean house.

We lived simply, just like the other families on our street. We didn’t know any better, but we always had three square meals a day.

Here are some of the things she cooked for us:

  • Bologna, often sliced and fried. Bought in big chubs wrapped in red paper, bologna filled our bellies for years. Sometimes, mom would grate the bologna, add a few ingredients, and call it ham salad.
  • Sliced hot dogs. She’d split them in half and fry. Probably a substitute for bologna. If she kept the hot dog whole, I don’t recall her using a hot dog bun until years later. We’d use a slice of bread instead. Hot dog buns were available since the early part of the century, but no doubt she considered the bun an extravagance.
  • Jonathan apples. I barely remember any other fruit in the house but them, bought by the bagful. It was her go-to-snack for us kids. I remember the Jonathans as mushy (and yes, I know they make wonderful pies and crisp!) but to this day, I won’t eat one.  Red Delicious was expensive and purchased only for special occasions, and there weren’t the varieties we have today.
  • Cream of Wheat. I never liked the grainy texture of Cream of Wheat or Coco Wheats, but it sure stuck to our ribs and made for a cheap breakfast. Growing up, I put oatmeal in the same category, but I do like oatmeal now, as long as it’s loaded with nuts, raisins, cinnamon, and milk, none of which, of course, WE had back then!
  • Mayonnaise sandwiches. Except she never bought mayo, but Miracle Whip. Occasionally, we’d have lunch meat (see bologna above), but I loved mayonnaise sandwiches, always on Wonder Bread. At school, we didn’t have cafeterias, chairs or tables to eat lunch.  We sat on the church parking lot, on hard concrete, and never thought twice about it.
  • Powdered milk. Oh, we hated that! She’d try to sneak it on us kids, but we always knew. She’d stretch the powder by using less, which resulted in watery looking milk. Occasionally, she’d mix real milk in, which I suppose helped, but us kids always knew.
  • Chicken fryers. She never bought chicken pieces, which were more expensive, so farm girl that she was, she’d cut up whole chickens herself.  I can’t even count the number of Sundays we had fried chicken for dinner.
  • Jell-O. Who among you didn’t have Jell-O made as salads with shredded carrots and chopped celery, fruit cocktail, or canned pears? 
  • “Eat bread with it.” One of her favorite strategies to stretch the main course.
  • Spaghetti sauce. She never used canned or fresh tomatoes, but used tomato paste and water with the perfect amount of Italian seasonings. My mother’s spaghetti and meatballs (or featherbones) were family favorites, and even my Italian grandmother would have to agree my mother’s sauce was delicious!
  • Velveeta cheese. We never had cheddar, colby, Provolone, or anything like that. Always Velveeta, which we loved. Very versatile and back then, much cheaper than it is today.
  • Graham crackers and leftover frosting. If she made a cake and there was extra frosting, into graham crackers it would go, and it was a favorite cookie of ours.  I made these many times myself, and now my daughters do, too.
  • Kool-Aid. I think sugar must’ve been fairly cheap back then, because we had a lot of Kool-Aid, the powder in a package kind. Never soda pop or even lemonade.
  • Wax paper. She would wrap our sandwiches for school lunches in a sheet of wax paper like a present. Later, wax paper came in sandwich sized sacks that you had to fold at the top. Plastic baggies didn’t come for years later, but even if they were available, she would’ve considered them extravagant.

 

 

Oh, I could go on and on.  I’m sure you have memories of how you or your mom was frugal decades ago, or even now. How did she save pennies? What was your favorite frugal food?

Let’s chat!

 

Pam Crooks
Pam has written 24 romances, most of them historical westerns. She has just released her newest sweet historical romance, TRACE, the launch book for the Bachelors & Babies series starting in June, More of her books are coming! Stay up on the latest at www.pamcrooks.com
Updated: May 13, 2020 — 9:24 am

Winner! Winner!

Howdy!

Hope y’all had a terrific day today — and for all those of us who have these days running together nowadays…at least we have remembered what day it is today.  

Anyway, we do have a winner for the free e-book of THE EAGLE AND THE FLAME.  We have two winners, actually (sometimes when I draw out a person’s name, I get two pieces of paper at the same time.)

So, those winners are:  

Dawn &

Bill Koon Jr.

 

Dawn & Bill, if you would please email me privately with the address that you use at Amazon to buy things (NOT your Kindle address), I can get the book sent to you — it will come directly from Amazon.  My email address is:  karenkay.author@startmail.com

Congratulations to you both and many, many thanks to all those who came to the blog and who left a message.

Karen Kay
KAREN KAY aka GEN BAILEY is the multi-published author of American Indian Historical Romances. She has written for such prestigious publishers as AVON/HarperCollins, Berkley/Penguin/Putnam and Samhain Publishing. KAREN KAY’S great grandmother was Choctaw Indian and Kay is honored to be able to write about the American Indian Culture.
Please refer to https://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules for all contest rules.
Updated: May 13, 2020 — 7:21 pm

Linda Carroll-Bradd Will Visit Friday!

        Miss Linda Carroll-Bradd has saddled up and will arrive Friday, May 15, 2020!

What do you know about health spas? She’s going to tell us about that.

She also has a new book and a giveaway! Yee-Haw!

If you need to enrich your learning or to have a good time, head over.

You never know what you’ll find.

One thing for sure, it’ll be a blast.

                              

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: May 13, 2020 — 9:55 am

Damsels on Railroad Tracks

No western romance trope is more cheesy or more famous than the old Damsel on the Railroad Tracks trope. Which is why when I recently wrote a scene that ended with my heroine stuck on a railroad bridge with a train heading for her, I just had to giggle. I promise the scene is ripe with tension and believability. There is no mustachioed villain cackling in the background. And she’s not actually tied to the tracks. She doesn’t even scream for help. Though our hero is still called upon to rush in to make a daring rescue.

So how did this trope get started and how has it endured so long in tongue-and-cheek fashion?

Most people credit the damsel on the tracks to the melodramas of silent movies. However, the first time it appeared with significant impact was on stage in an 1867 play called Under the Gaslight by Augustin Daly. By 1868, the trope reportedly could be found in five different London plays all running at the same time, and remained a theatre staple for decades. But here’s the kicker. In the original story, it is a man who has been tied to the railroad tracks and a woman who rescues him!

This trope became so popular in the theatre, that even though there are no original silent movies that use this plot in a serious fashion, several used it for comedic effect. The most notable of these spoofs was a Keystone Komedy called Barney Oldfield’s Race for a Life from 1913. Note the top hat and impressive mustache on the villain. Those become staples of the trope.

Some of you will probably remember watching the classic cartoon The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle, either when it aired in the 1960’s or in reruns in the 1970’s like I did. This was a silly spoof that used over-the-top villains to hilarious effect. One of the main characters on the show was the dim-witted yet heroic Mountie named Dudley Do-Right. His nemesis Snidely Whiplash wore a top hat, sported a curvy mustache, and had a tendency to tie damsels to railroad tracks. Hence the trope was preserved for a new generation.

In 1969, Ray Stevens released a song called Along Came Jones which reached #27 on the billboard charts. My husband and I are big oldies fans, so we love this silly song and have even shared it with our kids – successfully perpetuating the trope into the future.

  • Do you remember any of these songs or shows?
  • Besides the top hat and mustache, what are other villain elements that have become cliche over time?

Speaking of damsels and railroads, my Harvey House Brides novella collection, Serving Up Love, is on sale this month for only $1.99.
Grab a copy while you can!

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Christianbook

Karen Witemeyer
For those who love to smile as they read, bestselling author Karen Witemeyer offers warmhearted historical romance with a flair for humor, feisty heroines, and swoon-worthy Texas heroes. Karen is a firm believer in the power of happy endings. . . and ice cream. She is an avid cross-stitcher, and makes her home in Abilene, TX with her husband and three children. Learn more about Karen and her books at: www.karenwitemeyer.com.

THE EAGLE AND THE FLAME, Excerpt & Give-Away

Well, I’m a little late — don’t know what has happened to my time clock.  Seems that all the days are running into one another.

Hope y’all will forgive me.

Well, because I’m so late, I’ll give away an e-book of the new book, THE EAGLE AND THE FLAME, so hopefully you can come on in and leave a comment and get into the drawing for the free book. 

Excerpt:  THE EAGLE AND THE FLAME by Karen Kay

THE EAGLE AND THE FLAME

Blurb:

A vision foretold his tribe’s doom.  Is the flame-haired beauty the trickster or his true love?

 

Lucinda Glenforest’s father, a general who’d fought in the Indian Wars, taught his flame-haired daughter to out-shoot even the best men the military could put up against her. When Luci’s sister is seduced and abandoned, it’s up to Luci to defend her honor in a duel.  Although she wins, the humiliated captain and his powerful family vow vengeance. The sister’s only hope is to flee and hide until their father returns from his overseas mission.  Out of money, Luci hatches a plan to disguise herself as a boy and use her sharpshooting skills in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

The chief of the Assiniboine tribe has a terrifying vision, that someone called the deceiver, or trickster, spells doom for the children of his tribe.  He enlists Charles Wind Eagle to join Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, in hopes of appealing to the President of the United States for help, and to find and stop the deceiver. When Wind Eagle is paired with a girl whom he knows is disguised as a boy, he believes she might be the deceiver.  Still, she stirs his heart in ways he must resist, for he has a secret that can never be told, nor ignored.  And Luci can never forget that her father would destroy Wind Eagle if she were to fall in love with him.

Forced to work together, they can’t deny their growing attraction.  Will Luci and Wind Eagle find a way through the lies to find true love?  Or will they be consumed by the passion of deception and slander?

Warning:  A sensuous romance that might cause a girl to join the rodeo in order to find true love.

 

 

“With any wood, you must look for as straight a piece of it as possible.  Try to find one that is free of offshoots and knots. You will want as large a log as you can find and is easy to manage.”

          “But I thought that one had to fell a tree to get the wood needed for a bow.”

          “Sometimes, that is true,” he replied.  “But this wood that surrounds our camp is full of large branches that have only recently fallen, and these will do.  Over there—” he pointed, “do you see that big one?”

          She nodded and followed him toward it.  He picked it up and presented it to her.

          “Do you perceive that it is still wet?  Would make bad firewood, but good material for bow.  Do you have a large, firm piece of flint?”

          “Ah…no.”

          “Here, use mine.”  He pushed a piece of flint into her hand, where she stared at it, dumbfounded.

          “Ah…all right,” she acknowledged.  “But, couldn’t I just go out and buy a bow and some arrows?  If not from your people, there might be a store in this big city that would carry what I need.”
          “Not good.  Do we compete Indian-style, fairly matched, or do you wish to cheat?”

          “Ah…”

          “Think well on what I ask, for your answer will determine your character, I think.”

          It was a serious question, yet within his gaze, his eyes twinkled as though he were sharing a good joke with her.  Even one side of his lips slanted upward, in a half-hearted grin.

          She sighed.  It would appear that learning to shoot a bow and arrow as accurately as he did was going to be a little harder, and require more work than she had assumed.  Yet, she would not be turned away, and she would not be bested by him on a personal basis.  Angling him a sharp stare, she confessed, “I suppose I would rather buy a bow and some arrows, but, if that is cheating and if that gives me an unfair advantage over you, a man who has shot a bow and arrow for all his life,” she continued sarcastically, “then I will do all I can to make a bow and some arrows as you instruct, but—be warned.”  She turned the sarcasm in her voice into as low and as stern a manner as she could, saying, “I don’t trust you.  There is a light in your eyes that makes me doubt your sincerity.  Although we have only just met, there are now many times when I have seen humor in your manner as you speak to me.  Do you think that I am stupid?”

          “Hiyá, I do not.”  He laughed, the action making light of his words.  “But,” he continued after a bit, “I believe that you might be hiding a truth that I have yet to discover.”

          “Baaa…”  She made the sound as she blew out a disgusted breath.  Nevertheless, she looked away from him.

          “That is what I suspect, but come, we will let the future tell us the truth.  For now, let us set to work and make that bow.  Then I will instruct you on the best way to create arrows that shoot straight every time.  Are you ready to begin?”

          She glanced up at him suspiciously, if only because he had given in to her doubts about him much too quickly.  All she said, however, was, “Yes, let’s start.”

          For answer, he merely winked at her, and, clearing a spot on the ground on which they were to work, he showed her how to use the flint he had given her as a tool to separate the bark from the wood.  And, as the sun arose in the eastern sky, showering her in its light, she threw herself into the chore, ignoring for the moment that the task was labor intensive and that the temperature was getting hotter, and hotter….

 

***

“The day is warm,” he observed after they had been working over the making of the bow for several hours.  It was true.  Had he deliberately given her a seat in the sun, while he basked in the shade?  Even now, she could feel the beads of sweat that were gathering over her brow, several making paths down her face, and dripping down the end of her nose.

“Why don’t you do as I do,” he suggested, “and take off your shirt?”

          She glanced up at him to witness again that ever-present gleam of humor in his eye.  As her gaze met his, he again winked at her.  She looked away.  Why did he seem to be so perpetually in a good mood?  And why did he appear to be continuously laughing at her?  Hadn’t her father said that these people were glum and sullen?  She didn’t answer his question.

          He continued, “Let us take our leave from this task and journey to the water that is hidden from the many eyes of the Showman’s performers.  There we could cool off from this heat by swimming as nature intended, as naked as the day we were born.”

          Momentarily, she paused, shocked.  At last, however, she managed to mutter, “Ah…no thanks.”

          “No?”  Again that note of humor entered into his expression.  “Then perhaps we might journey to the arena, where we can both show each other the strength of our skills.”

          The idea of ceasing this project, if only for a moment, seemed to her to be a gift from the gods, and she at once agreed, saying, “Yes.  That would be most welcome.”

          “Then come, follow me,” he encouraged, rising to his feet.  “I will show you the way to the arena that the Showman uses for his exhibition.  That place is somewhat distant from here.”

          “Yes, good.  How many weeks do we have for practice before the show begins?”

          “Several, I believe.  Do you worry about that?”

          “Absolutely not.  I am certain I can learn to shoot an arrow as well as you in only a week.”  She frowned at him as she sarcastically added, “Although you have had a lifetime to perfect your skill.”

          His only answer to her ill-humor was a round of what appeared to be good-hearted laughter, and, truth be known, it was given at her expense….

 

 

 

Karen Kay
KAREN KAY aka GEN BAILEY is the multi-published author of American Indian Historical Romances. She has written for such prestigious publishers as AVON/HarperCollins, Berkley/Penguin/Putnam and Samhain Publishing. KAREN KAY’S great grandmother was Choctaw Indian and Kay is honored to be able to write about the American Indian Culture.
Please refer to https://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules for all contest rules.
Updated: May 12, 2020 — 5:28 pm

Winnie’s Winner!!

Thanks to everyone who stopped by to share their own Mother’s Day stories.  I threw all the names in a hat and selected

Jackie Wisherd

Congratulations Jackie! Please visit my website at https://www.winniegriggs.com/booklist.html to select the book you’d like to receive, then contact me with the title and your mailing info and I’ll get the book right on out to you.

Winnie Griggs
Winnie Griggs is the author of Historical (and occasionally Contemporary) romances that focus on Small Towns, Big Hearts, Amazing Grace. She is also a list maker, a lover of dragonflies and holds an advanced degree in the art of procrastination.
Three of Winnie’s books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, and one of those nominations resulted in a win.
Winnie loves to hear from readers. You can connect with her on facebook at www.facebook.com/WinnieGriggs.Author or email her at winnie@winniegriggs.com.
Updated: May 12, 2020 — 6:07 pm

Mother’s Day History and Trivia

Hello everyone, Winnie Griggs here. It’s Mother’s Day as I write this and even though Mother’s Day will be over by the time you see it, I thought it would be fun to share some history and fun facts that surround this special occasion. And yes, I know that for many of us, this Mother’s Day was celebrated differently than what we might have liked

HISTORY:

Mothers have been celebrated throughout history.

  • In one of the earliest celebrations was in ancient Greece. In the spring they would honor Rhea, mother of the gods and the goddess of fertility, motherhood and generation.
  • In ancient Roman there was also a spring festival celebrating a mother goddess named Cybele. It was held on the Ides of March, lasted three days and was called Hilaria. It involved having her followers make offerings at the temple, hold parades and masquerades and play games.
  • In England the day coincides with an observance called Mothering Sunday. Originating in the 17th century, it takes place on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Traditionally, families who had moved away would return home to the original church they attended. A prayer service honoring the Virgin Mary was held and then afterwards children would present flowers to their own mothers.
  • In America, the celebration had a different origin.
    In an effort to honor her own mother Anna Jarvis, who was not a mother herself,  wanted to establish a day to celebrate mothers in an intimate manner. She tirelessly campaigned to that end and in May of 1913 President Woodrow Wilson signed a Joint Resolution designating the second Sunday in May to be Mother’s Day, thus making it a national day of celebration.
    Unfortunately Anna’s story does not have a happy ending. She quickly became disillusioned with the holiday, declaring it had become overly commercialized and that this detracted from the personal aspects she had envisioned. She began staging boycotts and walkouts. Anna eventually spent all her money fighting her cause and died, destitute, at the age of 84 in a sanitorium.

GIFT GIVING

  • In 2017 approximately $23.5 billion was spent on Mother’s Day gifts and the average consumer in the US spent a little over $185 on their moms.
  • Mother’s Day holds the record as the third highest day for flower and plant purchases Only Christmas and Hanukkah rank higher. In fact, approximately one fourth of all flowers purchased annually are bought for Mother’s Day. Something that may account for why Mothers love getting flowers is that a study conducted by Nancy Etcoff, Ph.D of Harvard Medical School, found that that when fresh-cut flowers are around it generally makes people more compassionate and happier in general.
  • It will probably also come as no surprise that Mother’s Day is the most popular day of the year for folks to eat out, beating out even Valentine’s Day for that honor. In 2018 approximately 87 million adults visited restaurants on Mother’s Day.
  • And for those who can’t be there in person to take their mom to a restaurant, Mother’s Day is also the day that ranks as the highest for number of phone calls made. That number  reaches something around 122 million.
  • In 2018 Approximately $4.6 billion was spent on jewelry during the Mother’s Day buying period.
  • And of course the most popular item to give Mother on her special day is a card. Every Mother’s Day about 152 million cards are sent.

TRIVIA

  • During the 1920s France handed out medals to mothers who had large families. This was done to signify gratitude for helping to rebuild the population of the country that was devastated by the loss of so many lives during WWI. The practice was eventually discontinued and today the more common gift for a mother in France is a cake shaped like a flower.
  • The record for the oldest woman to give birth is held by a retired schoolteacher in India. Satyabhama Mahapatra gave birth to a boy at age 65.
  • The record for the shortest length of time between births is held by Jayne Bleackley whose two babies were born only 208 days apart.
  • On the flip side, the woman who holds the record for the longest interval between births is Elizabeth Buttle. Her first child was born in May of 1956 and her second in November of 1997 when Elizabeth was 60. The infants were born 41 years and 185 days apart.
  • The record for the highest number of babies born to a single woman is a whopping 69! The woman was a Russian peasant living in the 18th century. She gave birth to 16 sets of twins, seven sets of triplets and 4 set of quadruplets.
  • And did you ever wonder why the word for Mom in nearly every language starts with an “M” sound? It is likely because the first sound an infant learns to verbalize is the ma sound. Since babies only need to open and close their lips to make these sounds – no teeth or tongue are needed – it comes more easily to them than other sounds.

There you have it. Did any of these facts surprise you? Also, how do you normally celebrate Mother’s Day and how was it different this year?  Leave a comment to be entered in a drawing for winner’s choice of any book from my backlist.

 

 

Winnie Griggs
Winnie Griggs is the author of Historical (and occasionally Contemporary) romances that focus on Small Towns, Big Hearts, Amazing Grace. She is also a list maker, a lover of dragonflies and holds an advanced degree in the art of procrastination.
Three of Winnie’s books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, and one of those nominations resulted in a win.
Winnie loves to hear from readers. You can connect with her on facebook at www.facebook.com/WinnieGriggs.Author or email her at winnie@winniegriggs.com.
Updated: May 11, 2020 — 4:09 am

Water Dictated Wagon Train Routes …

 

For the brave souls who undertook the arduous, twenty-one-hundred-seventy-mile journey along the Oregon Trail, there
was a constant struggle to provide enough water for themselves and their animals. Their prairie schooner could carry only one-ton of supplies. Typically, a water barrel strapped to the side of the wagon only held fifteen to twenty gallons.

Most wagon masters encouraged their charges to have six or seven pair of oxen, and each animal needed fifteen to twenty gallons of water per day. Each person used a gallon or less for their needs, so no one could carry enough water. Consequently, all the well-traveled trails leading to Oregon or California followed a river. In addition to the water supply, that’s where the grass was the best as well.

Most wagon trains averaged covering fifteen to twenty miles in a day—that’s going approximately a ten-hour day with a noon hour dinner break. Of the remaining fourteen hours, a considerable portion was devoted to water needs—either taking the oxen to water, the easiest, or hauling water to the animals at ten gallons a trip.
With water weighing eight-point-three pounds per gallon. That’s about all any grown man would want to carry in two five-gallon water buckets per trip. It didn’t leave a whole lot of time for doing much else, other than trying to sleep a bit.
The emigrants first crossed the Missouri River then went northwest to pick up the Platte River which would provide all the wagon trains water for about half of their journey. It took them west through what is today Nebraska then more north and still west across Wyoming. They traveled beside the Sweetwater River and Green River before picking up the Snake River in what is Idaho today. Those going on to Oregon kept with it.

Settlers headed to California broke off the Oregon Trail at Fort Hall then started south along the Humboldt and later the Truckee River. For those sojourners, water became an even greater consideration. The closer the train got to the Forty Mile Desert, located in Nevada. It ran from the end of the Humboldt River to either the Carson River or the Truckee River.
This was the most dreaded section of their travels. The closer the trains got to it, the more alkaline the water became. Experienced wagon train masters encouraged their people to bring vinegar to neutralize some of the alkaline and make it more drinkable.

The reason crossing the Forty Mile Desert was the most difficult challenge of course was the lack of water, but also the extreme temperatures.

Most trains hit the desert in August, trying to get over the Sierra Nevada mountain range before the first snow. Being the hottest part of summer, they traveled only at night. Before 1850 almost a thousand people died there and ten thousand animals.

Mark Twain went across it and said of his journey, “It was a dreary pull and a long and thirsty one, for we had no water. From one extremity of this desert to the other, the road was white with the bones of oxen and horses. It would hardly be an exaggeration to say that we could have walked the forty miles and set our feet on a bone at every step!”

Would you have undertaken such a perilous journey?

My newest novel LILAH released on May 3rd, my seventieth birthday! It is book five in the Prairie Roses Collection for Mother’s Day each year, offering strong-hearted heroines who traveled in the 1800s by covered wagon. It’d be a blessing to me for you to try this story, especially if I’m a new author to you! LILAH at AMAZON
((TO LINK:  https://amzn.to/2xBFhxs

 

 

 

GIVEAWAY
Wanting to BE a blessing, I’ve arranged a gift for all the Petticoats & Pistols’ readers today. JEWEL’S GOLD will be FREE at AMAZON ((TO LINK: https://amzn.to/2YIYvMT from Friday, May 8th through Tuesday, May 12th! Y’all enjoy! (UPDATE: There was a snafu with Amazon. Caryl has reset the book to be free, but it won’t start until tomorrow Saturday, May 9. The freebie will extend through Wednesday, May 13. She apologizes profusely!)

 

 

 

 

 

Bio : Award-winning, hybrid author Caryl McAdoo prays her story gives God glory. Her best-selling novels have garnered over 1000 5-Star reviews, attesting to the Father’s love and favor. Readers love her historical Christian romance family sagas best, but she also writes Christian contemporary romance, Biblical fiction, and for young adults and mid-grade booklovers. They count Caryl’s characters as family or close friends. The prolific writer loves singing the new songs God gives her almost as much as penning tales—hear a few at YouTube! Married to Ron over fifty years, she shares four children and nineteen grandsugars. The McAdoos live in the woods south of Clarksville, seat of Red River County in far Northeast Texas, waiting expectantly for God to open the next door.

Links :
Amazon – http://www.amazon.com/Caryl-McAdoo/e/B00E963CFG?tag=pettpist-20

BookBub – https://www.bookbub.com/authors/caryl-mcadoo?follow=true

Website: http://www.CarylMcAdoo.com

Newsletter: http://carylmcadoo.com/sign-up-to-the-caryler/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_1hQx6UZbWi3OYwmKKxh6Q
(Hear Caryl sing her New Songs!)

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CarylMcAdoo.author

Guest Blogger

Ruthy’s Winners!

Trudy and Anne, you have both won a copy of Learning to Trust, Ruthy’s latest Love Inspired! Congratulations and thank you for stopping by the blog for a big howdy yesterday!

Ruth Logan Herne
Multi-published, bestselling, award-winning author Ruth Logan Herne lives on a small farm in Western New York surrounded by grown kids, cute grandkids, cats, dogs, chickens, frogs, toads and snakes. That's why writing Westerns doesn't scare her. Not one smidge. Because she's surrounded by critters of all sorts, and has been known to teach lessons on snakes as available... She started writing Westerns by accident/invitation, and L-O-V-E-D it... matched with her love for both historicals and contemporaries, Ruthy's working on a new Western series for Love Inspired, New England mysteries for Guideposts and her historical Westerns for the indie market in 2018. She loves God, her family, her country and absolutely, positively loves what she does!
Updated: May 7, 2020 — 8:22 pm

What Day Is It, Anyway?????

OH mylanta, I am sitting here typing furiously because I realized it’s May 6th and I’m posting something brilliant on May 7th and I haven’t had a brilliant thought all stinkin’ day!

So this is kind of ya’ get what ya’ get, folks, and I’m laughing at myself, but we’re all in the same boat…. calendars yawn empty. Day follows day without appointments or meetings or if you do have meetings (I still do) they’re via Zoom and that’s about as exciting as my day gets….

AN EMPTY CALENDAR… I haven’t had an empty calendar since the 60’s and I don’t even remember that one…. I’m just assuming I had one as a kid! How weird is this????

And it’s spring and I’m yearning for baby animals and flowers, but it took a LONG time for spring to come here, and it’s still hit-and-miss.

I love having baby animals around. We have a young Golden Doodle “Maggie” who we’re going to breed to our Golden Doodle (who is jet black) this summer and have fall puppies…. so that will be fun/crazy/amazing and it will fall during autumn (which is also fall, but that would have been an odd sentence, right???) and in the meantime, it’s farm season and pumpkin growing season and of course I sneak out of bed at night and write books.

But getting ready for the farm season with helpers is awkward this year.

THERE ARE PEOPLE INVOLVED.

There haven’t been people in this house since the 3rd of March, so the young dog is going a little bat-waggy because she’s forgotten about people and kids, my daughter and son-in-law work on the farm and they come equipped with four children, my son works on the farm and we have two wonderful teen helpers that are not allowed to grow up because they’ll leave and work somewhere else and I love them. But what better gift to give them than a good work ethic?

I think that’s one of the things we love about Westerns and cowboys, both historical and contemporary because if they’re worth writing about it’s because they’re probably smokin’ hot (even some geeks are smokin’ hot, in a nerd-cute way, right?)…. they take care of animals which means they put others first and they’re not afraid to get dirty but clean up nice.

Sweet!

It feels odd to have folks around again. But it feels good, too.

There are wood customers stopping by so we have masks.

Dave’s mask was gross. He’d been cutting wood all day and it was gross….. to the max.

And he said, “Well it doesn’t matter, does it?”

Probably not to him.

He’s a boy.

And he’s cutting firewood, so there you go.

And then my friend Cate Nolan shared this with me yesterday:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nw5KQMXDiM4&fbclid=IwAR0LBDCym_F5Gdsqaio_pBHSJcylD3PtZDpL9desUho2zgxUk8ZSfmu2y0U

And that’s a wake up call all its own.

My April book is still on shelves here and there around the nation… And I have a Guideposts mystery due to come out in June….

And an indie book soon after…

And there will be farm work and children and laughter and running and projects and all kinds of things going on…

And it will seem more normal for me. For us.

But still so abnormal for so many. The areas hardest hit are still in for a rough haul… and I expect the politics and the back-and-forth of the situation will have its day/week/month/election season.

That’s how it goes… but there will be flowers. And little kids cutting flowers. And cakes and Zoom meetings and people waving and laughing and hugging once again. Because we need hugs. We need warmth. We need togetherness in some ways, even if we help each other by staying apart.

Amidst all of this there’s a lovely constant. Faith. God. Prayer. And that’s my mainstay to keep myself focused.

And there are books! I’m giving away two copies of “Learning to Trust” my latest Love Inspired and they can be either Kindle or paperback, your choice.

Everyone needs a little help finding love….

 

Leave a comment below about how you’re getting through… and how you plan to re-open your homes as time goes on. There are no wrong answers here. We’re all at varying stages of our lives. Whatever we decide…. it’s our decision to make.

The coffee’s on!

Ruth Logan Herne
Multi-published, bestselling, award-winning author Ruth Logan Herne lives on a small farm in Western New York surrounded by grown kids, cute grandkids, cats, dogs, chickens, frogs, toads and snakes. That's why writing Westerns doesn't scare her. Not one smidge. Because she's surrounded by critters of all sorts, and has been known to teach lessons on snakes as available... She started writing Westerns by accident/invitation, and L-O-V-E-D it... matched with her love for both historicals and contemporaries, Ruthy's working on a new Western series for Love Inspired, New England mysteries for Guideposts and her historical Westerns for the indie market in 2018. She loves God, her family, her country and absolutely, positively loves what she does!