Godey’s Lady’s Book and Regina Scott’s New Release

I will admit to scanning online sites every spring and fall to discover the latest fashions trends. My heroine Beth Wallin in Frontier Matchmaker Bride has a greater passion for fashion, even on the frontier of 1875 Washington Territory. Her go-to source, pictured on the cover of her story, is Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Godey’s was the brainchild of Louis A. Godey, who saw the growing need for a magazine tailored specifically to the lady of the house. He hired a female editor, Sarah J. Hale, herself an author (often remembered for writing “Mary Had a Little Lamb”), who also ensured the rest of the staff was predominantly female. In fact, Godey boasted at having a corps of 150 female colorers who hand-tinted the fashion plates that started every issue.

The early issues of Godey’s carried articles taken from British women’s magazines. The magazine even had its own reporter simply to chronicle royal activities across the Pond. Though Sarah Hale was purportedly a huge fan of Queen Victoria, she wanted more of an American angle for the magazine. She was also a staunch supporter of women’s rights, believing that women needed to be redeemed from their “inferior” position and placed as an equal helpmate to man in every way.

She therefore commissioned articles, essays, stories, and poetry from American writers including Harriet Beecher Stowe and Frances Hodgson Burnett. Male luminaries Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allen Poe, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow also contributed. Articles covered health and science, crafts, dancing, horseback riding, home decorating, and recipes. Every issue included two pages of new sheet music for the pianoforte.

And women paid for the privilege of reading it. Subscriptions ran three dollars a year when other popular magazines of the time were only two dollars. The magazine was delivered by post all over the United States, from the gilded mansions on Boston’s Beacon Hill to the rustic ranches of the Texas Hill Country and the log cabins of Seattle.

Despite its broad coverage, Godey’s steered clear of politics. The Civil War was never mentioned in its pages. One source I consulted claimed that readership was cut by a third from its high of 150,000 subscribers during the war, implying that it was because of Godey’s non-political stance. I’m more inclined to believe that the magazine’s subscriptions fell during that time because women were counting pennies as husbands and fathers went off to war.

Regardless, Godey’s popularity led it to become a major force in America. The magazine is credited with popularizing a white wedding gown (after Victoria wore one in England), the use of a Christmas tree to crown that celebration, and the creation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday.

It even inspired Beth Wallin to create gowns far above those usually found on the frontier, thanks to a sister-in-law who is a seamstress and her own good taste. This is one of the gowns I pictured for her.


So, do you consider yourself a fashionista? What’s your go-to source?

Answer in the comments to be entered into a drawing for an autographed copy of Beth’s story, Frontier Matchmaker Bride.

The Lawman Meets His Match

Spunky Beth Wallin is determined to find a bride for Deputy Hart McCormick, the man who once spurned her affections.

After tragically losing his sweetheart, Hart vowed never to love again. He might be Beth’s first matchmaking miss, unless they can both admit that she would be his perfect match.

You can find the book on Amazon today: https://www.amazon.com/Frontier-Matchmaker-Bride-Bachelors-ebook/dp/B073B2NKQ3/a?tag=pettpist-20



About the Author

Regina Scott started writing novels in the third grade. Thankfully for literature as we know it, she didn’t actually sell her first Regency romance novel until she had learned a bit more about writing such as vocabulary, sentence structure, and plot. After numerous short stories and articles in magazines and trade journals, she got serious about her novel writing. The Regency romance The Unflappable Miss Fairchild was her first novel to be published (March 1998). In 2011, she was delighted to move into Christian romance with the publication of The Irresistible Earl. Her novels have been translated into Dutch, German, Italian, and Portuguese; and a large number have been issued in hardcover, large print editions. She has twice won the prestigious RT Book Reviews Reviewer’s Choice award for best historical Christian romance of its type, for The Heiress’s Homecoming in 2013 and Would-Be Wilderness Wife in 2015.

Connect with her online at her website or sign up for her newsletter.

Guest Blogger


The winner of a copy of 

The Accidental Guardian


Becca F

and I am picking a bonus winner

Stephanie Jenkins Ortiz Cerrillo

Ladies I will email you and get an address

If you do not hear from me email me at:




And thank you all for hanging around Petticoats and Pistols

Mary Connealy
Author of Romantic Comedy...with Cowboys including the bestselling Kincaid Brides Series
Updated: March 15, 2018 — 10:55 pm



For the last year or so, I’ve been doing a series of blog posts (often interrupted for other stuff) about Pathfinders.

Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, John Coulter, John Mullen<< a cool guy not well known, James P Beckwourth, Sacagawea…oh I did a bunch of them.

What set me on my way researching these pathfinders was my current series. And dealing with a young man, 16 years old, who survives a wagon train massacre on a little used trail in the heart of the Rocky Mountains right as the snow begins to fall. (hello, Donner Party!!!)

He very simply gets lost. He finds a way to survive the winter and it wasn’t easy. Then he’s just so lost. He wandered for two long searching for a trail in the oncoming winter, now he can’t find his way–anywhere. In the end, he just stayed there. Stayed in the mountains. He doesn’t see another human being for about five years.

My question, what started my research was, could this really happen?

I tried to get a sense of scope of how big the Rockies are. How deep the snow. How hard it is to find a trail. We are so cut off from that kind of experience now, with paved roads and cell phones with GPS and (for heaven’s sakes) airplanes.

We barely need to know the sun comes up in the east and sets in the west. And even that is a fun fact, nothing we particularly use to find out way home.

So the book is here.

Trace Riley is here.

He’s been in the mountains a long time. He finally found another man who stayed and worked on Trace’s ‘sort of’ ranch. This man told Trace where a town was, so Trace went in and staked a claim to the land he’d been living on for years. He’s built up a small herd, so Trace hires another man and the three of them drive some cattle to market.

Now Trace knows where he is, how to get to a town. He rode all the way to the ocean after the cattle drive to Sacramento, and he’s coming home a happy man.

And then, like a monster rising out of his worst nightmares, he comes upon another wagon train massacre. And the signs as Trace reads them, and he’s gotten very very good, say this was done by the same men who attacked his wagon train and killed his father.

And then, out of the tall grass, a woman comes running, crying for help.

It’s like he hears his own voice and he can do nothing less than to be her guardian…and then someone else comes running, her sister, okay, now he’s going to take care of two women. And wait, what is she carrying? A baby? No, TWO babies.

Trace has a long cold ride to get home, he’s mostly out of food, he’s got one horse and a lot of potential riders.

He is, most definitely, an accidental guardian.

Today, leave a comment to get your name in a drawing for a signed copy of The Accidental Guardian, book #1 of the High Sierra Sweethearts trilogy.

And, because it’s MARCH and that is calf time!!! (sort of like half-time only with less football and more mooing)…here is a picture of a baby calf…I’m doing a parade of our new baby calves on Facebook, come and join the fun.

I just posted an exhaustive list of all my books on my blog

My Website

Click here to sign Up for my Newsletter

And I’m on Facebook talking about calves

Mary Connealy
Author of Romantic Comedy...with Cowboys including the bestselling Kincaid Brides Series
Updated: March 14, 2018 — 10:18 pm

Regina Scott Saddles Up

Miss Regina Scott has saddled up and riding this way. She’ll arrive on Friday, March 16, 2018!

She’s going to tell us about the first women’s magazine and how it changed the landscape and helped women.

Miss Regina also has a new book out and itching to tell us about it.

AND…she’s toting an autographed copy to give away!

Don’t miss the fun. Head over and join us in the parlor.

While you have tea and crumpets, you might even learn something.

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: March 11, 2018 — 12:07 pm

Bested by a Buzz Wagon

I’ve spent many hours the last few weeks combing through digital editions of old newspapers from Pendleton, Oregon.

As I was browsing through the news on one front page, a headline caught my eye.

Buzz Wagon Proves Too Much for Ted

The first thought that popped into my head was “what’s a buzz wagon?” The second was “who’s Ted?”

If, like me, you haven’t been exposed to the early 20th century slang term, a buzz wagon is what some people used to refer to an automobile. (Presumably from the noise emitted from those early vehicles.)

On a lovely June day in 1912, a cowboy named Ted and another cowpuncher brought 300 head of horses to Pendleton to sell.

According to the newspaper, Ted could ride anything that had two ears and a tail, but the “golderned buzz wagon” was too much for the buckaroo to handle.

While they waited around town the evening before they were to set to sell the horses, Ted and his fellow cowpuncher wandered down to the Pendleton Round-Up grounds to see what amusements they might find.

What they found was an automobile left sitting in the arena, unattended, while members of the Elks club tried out teams for an upcoming chariot race (wouldn’t that be fun to see?).

The two cowboys thought the seats of the auto looked inviting, so they slid in to watch the proceedings. After a while, Ted landed on the brilliant idea of taking the auto for a spin. Although he’d never been in an automobile before, let alone drove one, he asked his friend to get out and give the car a crank to start it.

The car started but ol’ cowboy Ted found he couldn’t control the “red devil” as it traveled across the track of the arena. He whipped the wheel one way then the other, touched every button and pulled every lever to no avail. The auto stopped when he bashed into a pole at full speed.

When the owner of the car arrived on the scene, Ted offered to buy the man a new automobile. The owner thought he could have the auto repaired and they settled on $25 payment.

Ted declared he was through with man’s inventions, much preferring a bucking horse than the unpredictability of a “buzz wagon.”

To find out more about the happenings in Pendleton during 1912, be sure to attend the Petticoat Ball on April 12 on Facebook! The fun begins at 10 a.m. (Pacific Time) and runs until 2 p.m. Guest authors, games, giveaways, and details about my latest Pendleton Petticoats book, Quinn, will be shared!


Shanna Hatfield
After spending her formative years on a farm in Eastern Oregon, hopeless romantic Shanna Hatfield turns her rural experiences into sweet historical and contemporary romances filled with sarcasm, humor, and hunky western heroes.
When this USA Today bestselling author isn’t writing or covertly hiding decadent chocolate from the other occupants of her home, Shanna hangs out with her beloved husband, Captain Cavedweller.

Deadwood’s Mount Moriah

This may seem morbid to some but I’ve always loved cemeteries. I love walking through them, reading the tombstones, imagining the person’s story. Did they achieve their hopes and dreams? Did they know love? Were they loved in return? How did they die? So many questions go through my mind. One of the most interesting trips my husband and I went on before he passed was to Deadwood. So much history there. Deadwood is where Wild Bill Hickok met his end in the Nuttal and Mann’s Saloon, shot by Jack McCall. Hickok, as well as Calamity Jane and a whole lot of others, is buried in the Mount Moriah cemetery.

Records show that in Deadwood’s first three years as a town there were 97 murders and suicides.

Here are few of Mount Moriah’s residents:

POTATO CREEK JOHNNY was a Welch immigrant at seventeen years old and looking for gold and excitement. Johnny (real name John Perrett) stood just 4’ 3” tall and as he grew older, he let his hair and whiskers grow long. Folks said he resembled one of Snow White’s dwarfs. Then one memorable day in May 1929, in working his mine, he discovered one of the largest gold nuggets anyone in South Dakota had ever seen. It weighed 73/4 troy ounces and valued at $45,000 at today’s currency rate. The find thrust him into celebrity status and he became a regular in all the parades. Folks from all around visited the cabin he built by himself in the woods. In 1943 at 77 years old, he took sick and died. He’s buried next to Wild Bill and Calamity Jane.


PREACHER SMITH was the first missionary in Black Hills and he was undoubtedly one of the most famous good guys. His real name was Henry Weston Smith and he walked into Deadwood with a wagon train in May 1876. He began preaching on the jam-packed street to the cutthroats, gamblers, prostitutes, and anyone who would listen. Tough, grizzled miners wearing guns would sit on the wooden planks or stand and listen to him. They always passed the hat at the end. August 20, 1876, he preached his last sermon and headed to a nearby town. He never made it. They found him three miles from Deadwood, shot through the heart. The killer was never found. All of Deadwood’s businesses shut down for the burial on Mount Moriah.


CHAMBERS DAVIS came to Deadwood in 1877 from the Denver Mint. He was an expert at ore testing an opened an assayer office on Main Street. He had a credit of $100,000 with which he was able to buy ore for California companies from eager prospectors. He was young and had a beautiful young wife, Adrienne. They were a popular young couple and were mentioned frequently in the social columns of the newspaper. In June 1878, she died very suddenly at the age of 33 of unknown causes. Then a year later in April, Chambers also died very suddenly and was buried next to his wife.


KITTY LEROY was Deadwood’s most famous soiled dove. The magnetic beauty was also a bigamist, married to five men all at the same time. Kitty was always armed to the teeth with two pistols, a couple of Bowie knives, and a dagger she tucked into her long brown curls. She wore huge diamonds in her ears and knew how to show a man a good time. In fact, men fought and killed over her. She was a professional dancer in the saloons and was often found at the card tables where she cheated men out of their hard-earned gold. Sam Curley, her fifth husband, was a faro dealer and very jealous. On Dec. 7, 1877, he caught Kitty in bed with another man and shot her, then shot himself. She was only 28 years old. Their funerals were held in the Lone Star saloon and they buried in a double grave. A month after the tragedy, ghostly apparitions were seen and continued until the saloon was demolished.


These are just a few of the interesting stories that are buried in Mt. Moriah cemetery. I’ll end this with a poem someone wrote upon the death of Marie Gaston, Deadwood’s first librarian.

How vainly we struggled to save her,

Around her how deeply we mourned,

When back to her Maker who gave it

Her beautiful spirit returned.


I just love visiting old cemeteries. In a plot next to my parents in the small country cemetery where they’re buried is a family who all died in the 1800s. The wife’s name was Texanna and I used her name as my heroine in a story I wrote for Give Me a Texas Ranger. I’m always finding something of interest. Do cemeteries interest you? Maybe you have one you’d like to share.

  • * ~  * ~  * ~  * ~  * ~  * ~  * ~  *
Linda Broday
I live in the Texas Panhandle where we love our cowboys.There's just something about a man in a Stetson that makes my heart beat faster. I'm not much of a cook but I love to do genealogy and I'm a bit of a rock hound. I'm also a NY Times & USA Today bestselling author of historical western romance. You can contact me through my website and I'd love to connect with you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and more. HAPPY READING!

BEWARE THE IDES OF MARCH–VILLAINS AND TREACHERY! by Cheryl Pierson #blogabookscene #Prairierosepub

Oh, how I love a good villain! Whether I’m reading about one or watching him/her on film, or best of all—WRITING ONE!

What makes a good villain? Well, in my opinion, first and foremost he can’t be one-dimensional. I know in our “real world” there are those people that seem to be evil just for the sake of it and some of them probably are. But in our reading/writing, we want to know WHY. What made this person turn out like he did—a diabolical, cunning, demonic person that will stop at nothing to accomplish what he’s set out to do?


This leads to the question, is there anything at all that would stop him from carrying out his evil plans? Would a memory stop him, or trigger him? Would any one person be able to reason with him? Would a “new plan” divert him from carrying out the blueprint for disaster for the hero/heroine that he’s already come up with?



But there are other things that have to be reckoned with. Those things that might have happened to him in his past to create and mold him into the kind of person who would be so bold and determined to use anything—no matter how it hurts others—to his own advantage are important. But what are the factors that drive him presently? A circumstance of opportunity? A long-seated need for revenge and the path to that revenge being presented? Greed? Burning jealousy? Maybe even the death of a loved one that he may not have wanted to embarrass by his actions while they were still living—now that they’re gone, all bets are off! THE DEVIL AND MISS JULIA JACKSON has the heroine caught between a distant relative who throws her and her niece out of their home and the job as nursemaid she takes in Indian Territory, working for a man who is, at first, cold and unresponsive. The villain in this story shifts between the man who threw Julia out of her home to someone else who means to destroy her employer.





I’ve had so many villains I’ve created in my writing that were motivated by different things. My first one, Andrew Fallon, appeared in FIRE EYES. He was just pure evil. He didn’t care about anything or anyone—even his family, as his brother found out when he came looking for him.








In my first contemporary romantic suspense, SWEET DANGER, Tabor Hardin has his revenge handed to him on a silver platter, being in the right place at the right time to turn the tables on the undercover cop who put him in jail—before his escape. He’s a man with nothing to lose at this point, and Jesse Nightwalker, the cop, has a new life hovering on the horizon—if he can survive.









The villain is paranormal in TIME PLAINS DRIFTER—a demon who can shape-shift. How in the world will the innocents he’s after survive? They have a reluctant angel or two on their side, but the demon is powerful. Can they overcome his strength?



Greed comes into play in BEYOND THE FIRE, when undercover DEA agent Jackson Taylor’s cover is blown and a drug lord comes after him, trying to use Jack’s undercover partner against him. But there is a secret that even Jack hasn’t known about his partner—and the woman he’s falling in love with. Is it enough to defeat the powerful drug cartel and keep Jackson, Kendi, and his partner safe?

Treachery comes in all forms and it’s most often quite a surprise. No matter how vigilant our heroes are, they come up against some very foreboding, sharp cunning from the villains—after all, they have to have a worthy opponent, right?

Speaking of worthy opponents, I’ll talk a little about my contemporary romantic suspense CAPTURE THE NIGHT—where the villain, Kieran McShane, runs his own rogue faction of the Irish Republican Army and plans to murder Great Britain’s Prime Minister while he’s on vacation in Dallas. Johnny Logan is an undercover Dallas cop, staying in the hotel as added protection for the prime minister; Alexa Bailey is treating herself to a one-year divorce anniversary vacation. When McShane takes over the entire hotel, it’s only a matter of time before he discovers them up on the roof in the maintenance housing—and collateral damage means nothing to him. With the hostages brought to the roof, McShane threatens to begin throwing them over one by one—unless his demands are met. Can Johnny and Alexa survive the whims of a madman, bent on political revenge?


One of my favorite recent stories is SABRINA, one of four novels that appears in the boxed set MAIL ORDER BRIDES FOR SALE: THE REMINGTON  SISTERS. Four sisters are at the mercy of their stepfather who plans to sell them to the highest bidder now that their mother is dead. But these girls have other plans. Can they manage to get away? Will they be able to keep themselves safe from Josiah Bloodworth no matter how far away they go? This is a very fun set of four full length novels, each sister’s story penned by a different author. Livia Washburn Reasoner—Lizzy; Jacquie Rogers—Belle; Celia Yeary—Lola; and Cheryl Pierson—Sabrina.  

Here’s an excerpt of Sabrina facing down the villain, her stepfather, in the dressmaker’s shop. Cam is listening to it all from the back, waiting for his chance to save her, his sister, and the proprietor of the shop. Here’s what happens:

“So you see, dear Sabrina, you have no true choice about what you do—and neither do your sisters.” Bloodworth spread his hands as he spoke. “You will, indeed, come home to Pennsylvania from this godforsaken place and do exactly as you are told. You will marry a man—a proper gentleman—of my choosing.” He took a step closer to her.

She faced him unflinchingly, her head held high. “I will no more return to Philadelphia with you than fly to the moon. You would do well to carry your pompous, maggot-ridden self away from here and get as far east as you can go posthaste—before my husband returns for us—and sends you straight to hell.” She spoke as regally as a queen to the lowliest dregs of society, without a trace of fear.

A thin smile touched Bloodworth’s lips, but the calm iciness in his pale eyes was what put Cam on alert. This man was determined, and he believed no one could stop him.

His muscle-bound cohort stood near the door, keeping watch so that Bloodworth didn’t need to worry about any distractions—from the two other women, or from any of the townspeople.

“My dear Sabrina, you are most definitely going to do exactly as I tell you. Or else.”

Else what? You’ll drag me back by my hair like the brute that you truly are?”

Bloodworth chuckled. “Well, well. Our little Sabrina has come into her own, hasn’t she?” He stroked his chin. “Actually, I don’t believe I shall have to drag you back. I think you most likely will do anything I say once I lay my hands on that half-breed husband of yours…even if I tell you to climb up on this counter and spread your legs like the whore you are…just like your mother was—”

The slap Sabrina gave Bloodworth echoed through the room, and brought a spot of blood to the corner of his mouth. Unruffled, he took out his handkerchief and dabbed at it.

“I’m going to kill your husband, Sabrina Rose. It will be a long…slow…and very, very painful death. And you will have only yourself to blame.”


So many wonderful reasons for becoming a villain! The motivations are just endless, aren’t they? It’s a fine line to walk, making them evil, yet sympathetic in some instances, and letting our readers see a glimpse of their humanity—if they have any left.

Do you have a favorite villain you’ve written or read? What about your favorite film villain?

PRAIRIE ROSE PUBLICATIONS WEBSITE:  http://prairierosepublications.com/

Cheryl’s Amazon Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/cheryl.pierson.92

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/cheryl.pierson.92  

Cheryl Pierson
A native Oklahoman, I've been influenced by the west all my life. I love to write short stories and novels in the historical western and western romance genres, as well as contemporary romantic suspense! Check my Amazon author page to see my work: https://www.amazon.com/author/cherylpierson
I live in Oklahoma City with my husband of 37 years. I love to hear from readers and other authors--you can contact me here: fabkat_edit@yahoo.com
Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cheryl.pierson.92

Sign up for P & P’s Newsletter!

Pam Crooks
Pam has written 14 western romances, most with Harlequin Historicals. She has recently re-released four titles by ebook, individually and in a boxed set titled IN THE ARMS OF A COWBOY. More releases are HER MOTHER'S KILLER, a romantic suspense, and THE SPYGLASS PROJECT, Book One of her new Secret Six series, historical suspense set in the 1920s! THE BREWER'S DAUGHTER, Book Two. Next up - KISSES LIKE WINE, Book Three!
Updated: March 11, 2018 — 7:44 pm

Diane Kalas Has Winners!


Many thanks to Miss Diane for visiting and for her thought-provoking post.

Now for the random drawing………………

Winner of Honor Bound….Stephanie Jenkins Ortiz Cerillo

Winner of Honor Bright…..Quilt Lady

Yippee! Congratulations, ladies! Keep your eyes peeled for Miss Diane’s email.

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: March 11, 2018 — 10:08 am

Diane Kalas introduces Honor Bound

Last March 2017, I introduced HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1, to readers of Petticoats and Pistols blog and the response delighted me. I am hooked on research and enjoy sharing it with readers. Please join in the discussion.

My current release is HONOR BOUND, An Inspirational Historical Romance Set in the West, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2.

I will gladly gift a paperback copy of HONOR BOUND to someone leaving a comment.

I will also gift a paperback copy of HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1, to another reader leaving a comment.

Captain Joseph Hawthorn, a character from book 1 is the hero of HONOR BOUND. Story opens in August 1875 and ends in May 1876, days before the 7th Cavalry departs Ft. Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, in pursuit of the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. Joe lost his fiancée to another officer of the 7th Cavalry in book 1, and learned the painful results of his arrogant behavior. Joe is a redeemed man now, although cautious about entering into a relationship with Ivy O’Hanlon, the girl who is determined to have him tutor her brother. With a spring campaign planned against the hostile Indians, he must consider Ivy should he not survive as an officer in Custer’s 7th Cavalry.

As a writer who has tackled serious subjects before, I enjoy adding humor. Davey O’Hanlon is a sixteen-year-old boy who idolizes Custer’s officers and wants to “go with Custer,” an idea that strikes terror into the heart of his sister, Ivy O’Hanlon. Readers will learn about the US Military Academy, known as West Point, and cadet training in the 1870s. Davey’s journey is pure fun to read. In addition, Ivy becomes a matchmaker for Sergeant Major MacIntyre, father of four redheaded sons in need of another wife. Love it!

Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer had many sides to his personality that have been well documented by family members, friends, and military leaders in numerous letters, books, newspaper articles, and interviews during his lifetime and afterward. My research unveiled events I never knew happened to the boy-general during that last year of his life.

Have you ever thought of Custer as a whistler-blower? Would you risk your career and take a stand against officials in your government when you knew they were lying to tax-paying citizens and cheating people, both the Indians and the Army’s enlisted men? I hope I have caught your interest.

Another facet to Custer’s last months of life was that he stood at a crossroads. Although, I believe Custer did not think of the drama that unfolded around him that spring of 1876 as a crossroads where he could take a different course of action other than what he pursued. I hope you are intrigued even more.

Each book in Officers of the 7th Cavalry takes the reader closer to the final event in the Little Bighorn Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and 268 troopers, including civilian and Indian scouts, and civilian family members of Custer lost their lives June 25, 1876.

Coming in spring 2019: HONOR FIRST, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 3. You will learn who survived the Custer massacre and who did not return to Ft. Lincoln from books 1 and 2.


An Inspirational Historical Romance Set in the West

Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2

August 1875. Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory. Lieutenant Joseph Hawthorn’s career goals in the United States Army Cavalry, centered upon exceeding Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s military achievements. Joe eagerly awaits the 1876 spring campaign with Custer and the famous 7th Cavalry in pursuit of the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians.

August 1875. Bismarck, Dakota Territory. Ivy O’Hanlon and her brother arrive in the Dakota Territory to live with their uncle who owns a tavern. Ivy has a huge problem. Her conscience will not allow her brother to assist Uncle Grady behind the bar. At 16, Davey idolizes Custer’s officers and wants to join the 7th Cavalry. Ivy fears losing her brother to the Army, but reluctantly decides the cavalry was better for Davey than working in the tavern.

With a ruined engagement behind him, the last thing Joe needs is to meet a beautiful woman with an Irish temperament, who is determined to help her brother pass the entrance exam into the U.S. Military Academy. As an officer and gentleman Joe could not refuse to tutor Davey O’Hanlon.

Ivy finds Lieutenant Joseph Hawthorn more than a golden-haired officer with vivid blue eyes. He is intensely serious, although manages to capture her romantic interest. For Joe, he tries to resist lovely Ivy O’Hanlon’s charm. After all, he may not return from the Indian campaign scheduled next spring 1876, as the 7th Cavalry heads to the Little Bighorn River valley.

Author Bio:

Diane Kalas, author of Inspirational Historical Romance, collects antique books written by men and women who lived through the American Civil War, and/or who pioneered out West. With a degree in interior design, she enjoys touring historical sites, especially Federal era homes with period furniture. Diane’s biggest challenge is writing Inspirational Historical Romance. Her biggest distraction is her fascination with historical research. Published writers Pamela Griffin, Gina Welborn, and Kathleen Maher have been critique partners and mentors. Diane is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers.

Diane’s novels are available on Amazon in E-book and paperback versions.

HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1

HONOR BOUND, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2

 PATRIOT HEART, Journey Home Series 1

FAITHFUL HEART, Journey Home Series 2

HOPEFUL HEART, Journey Home Series 3

Diane Kalas links:

Facebook | Blog | Pinterest | Twitter

Amazon:  https://tinyurl.com/y7odz5f5

You can also find her at: forgetmenotromances.com/authors/diane-kalas/

Guest Blogger
Petticoats & Pistols © 2015