The StageCoach Driver and a Giveaway!

 

Hi! Kit Morgan here and today I want to talk a little about the stagecoach driver!
Idolized by small boys, envied by grown men and held in awe by women, the stagecoach driver was king of his realm — or so says Cheryl Ann Stamp, who wrote a wonderful book on the stage coaches of Northern California.
But did you know that passengers lucky enough to occupy the seat next to him were there only at his personal invitation? Or that American stage drivers refused to be called coachmen? This was a term that described a servile British lackey, and what self-respecting stagecoach driver wanted to be associated with that?

They never accepted tips but would accept the “whip,” as it was the symbol of their profession. In fact, drivers were often referred to as “whips.” They were also sometimes referred to as “Jehu” from the Old Testament, Kings 9:20 which says: “… and the driving is like the driving of Jehu the son of Nimshi; for he driveth furiously.” To their faces, however, one just referred to the driver by their actual name.

Drivers loved and understood horses and the best developed incredible skills. Careful not to over-tire their teams with un-called for speed, they also never allowed the lash of a whip to touch their animals. How’s that for skill? In fact, boys who showed interest in becoming drivers started learning the art of reinmanship as young as seven or eight. They’d use a pretend wooden rig and learned their art in progressive phases until the ages of seventeen to nineteen.

Due to the nature of their business, most drivers led roving, unsettled lives, moving from one stage line to another or going from place to place on the same line.
Another interesting note, most dressed well. They could afford to. Many had the handles of their whips were inlaid with rings of silver. A driver’s favorite attire was often creased pants, cravats, waistcoats and tailored jackets. And of course we mustn’t forget high leather boots and long gauntlet gloves made from silk. Not exactly what we’ve seen in a lot of old westerns on television or in the movies is it? To keep this finery clean, they wore long linen overcoats — dusters — to protect their wardrobe.

I’ve not written a story with a stagecoach driver as a hero, but maybe I should. After researching this topic, I myself am definitely intrigued! I do have a stagecoach driver in my town of Clear Creek. Willie is a shy man missing his two front teeth. He lost them when his stage got robbed and he took a punch to the face. But he doesn’t wear any fancy clothes and as he has a short run between fictional towns, he’s my only driver. For a chance to win a copy of my upcoming release, The Sailor and the Suffragette, tell me what’s the first image you get when you think of a stagecoach driver! I’ll pick one random winner from the comments!

 

Kit Morgan
Kit Morgan is the author of over 80 books of historical and contemporary western romance! Her stories are fun, sweet stories full of love, laughter, and just a little bit of mayhem! Kit creates her stories in her little log cabin in the woods in the Pacific Northwest. An avid reader and knitter, when not writing, she can be found with either a book or a pair of knitting needles in her hands! Oh, and the occasional smidge of chocolate!
Updated: April 22, 2019 — 12:48 pm

Pam’s Game Winner!

 

My winner of the This or That game is

 

Glenda Kinard

 

It was great fun to read all your challenge questions!

Be sure to come back and play another game on

May 20th with

 

Ruth Logan Herne!

 

Pam Crooks
Pam has written 23 romances, most of them historical westerns. She has just re-released UNTAMED COWBOY, Book #1 in the C Bar C Ranch series. Coming soon is Book #2, KIDNAPPED BY THE COWBOY.
Pam is also looking forward to her newest sweet historical romance, TRACE, the launch book for the Bachelors & Babies series starting in June, More of her books are coming! Stay up on the latest at www.pamcrooks.com
Updated: April 23, 2019 — 7:48 am

Let’s Play A Game with Pam Crooks!

 

Are you ready to have some fun?

This game is one of my favorites.

It’s fast. It’s easy!

And every game should have a prize for the winner, right?

Play as often as you want to be eligible to win a

$5 Amazon gift card!

 

 

To play, just answer the THIS OR THAT question in the comment above you, then add one of your own!

I’ll start:

Pepsi or Coke?

Pam Crooks
Pam has written 23 romances, most of them historical westerns. She has just re-released UNTAMED COWBOY, Book #1 in the C Bar C Ranch series. Coming soon is Book #2, KIDNAPPED BY THE COWBOY.
Pam is also looking forward to her newest sweet historical romance, TRACE, the launch book for the Bachelors & Babies series starting in June, More of her books are coming! Stay up on the latest at www.pamcrooks.com
Updated: April 22, 2019 — 7:22 pm

Kari Trumbo Has a Winner!

Thank you for visiting, Miss Kari! We loved having you in our neck of the woods.

I put all the names in my spinner and…….

The lucky winner of Along a Tangled Path is…………

SALLY SCHMIDT

Oh my goodness! I’m doing the happy dance for you, Sally.

Miss Kari will contact you for your address so be watching! 

Tomorrow is Game Day everyone! Join us for some fun!

 

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: April 21, 2019 — 1:34 pm

A Sweepstakes Giveaway!

How does winning an new e-reader plus 25 historical western romances sound? Interesting? All you have to do is enter then sit back and wait for the outcome.

You can win Saving the Mail Order Bride! My Filly sister, Margaret Brownley, has her book in here too! Some of the others are Cynthia Woolf, Shirleen Davies, Heidi Betts and others.

Winners will be drawn on Wednesday, April 24, 2019!

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENTER

 

Linda Broday
I live in the Texas Panhandle where we love our cowboys. There's just something about a man in a Stetson that makes my heart beat faster. I'm not much of a cook but I love to do genealogy and I'm a bit of a rock hound. I'm also a NY Times & USA Today bestselling author of historical western romance. You can contact me through my website and I'd love to connect with you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and more. HAPPY READING!
http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules/
Updated: April 20, 2019 — 7:56 pm

Linda Broday Has Winners!

Thank you all for coming to read my blog on Tuesday and commenting! I loved it.

Now for the drawing……………

The random winners of an autographed copy of Saving the Mail Order Bride…….

ELIZA

ALISA BOISCLAIR

MELANIE BACKUS

ALICIA HANEY

Congratulations, ladies! I’ll contact but if you don’t want to wait, you can email me at linda (at) LindaBroday (dot) com with your home address.

Linda Broday
I live in the Texas Panhandle where we love our cowboys. There's just something about a man in a Stetson that makes my heart beat faster. I'm not much of a cook but I love to do genealogy and I'm a bit of a rock hound. I'm also a NY Times & USA Today bestselling author of historical western romance. You can contact me through my website and I'd love to connect with you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and more. HAPPY READING!
http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules/
Updated: April 20, 2019 — 7:42 pm

Welcome Guest Kari Trumbo!

When a cowgirl becomes a cow boss…

We all love reading about a fantastic hero. Sometimes, he even steals the show in romantic fiction. If you read westerns, the male lead is expected to be dashing, heroic, strong, capable, a good horseman, and he’s always good to his lady. But what about the heroine?

While the number of women who came west in the early-to-mid 1800’s was sparse (some figures claim it was as little as 10 to 1) by the late 1800’s, women were coming west for jobs and adventure. Just like their male counterparts. Women of the west were doing things that their sisters back east would swoon over.

In Along a Tangled Path, book 6 in my 7 book series, Brothers of Belle Fourche, Wilhelmina “Will” Galliger pretends to be a mute boy so, she can rope and ride her way to her own land. Her goal is her own ranch. My research tells me, though she is fictional, she was not alone. My character is very loosely based on Lucile Mulhall, from Charles Wellington’s Let ‘Er Buck: A Story of the Passing of the Old West. She is listed as the only woman to down a steer within the time limit at the Pendleton Round Up, among other things.

Women were allowed to have these roles, but they were rare. In the case of my heroine, she dresses as a man to avoid conflict. Of course, it adds a whole heaping helping when it’s discovered exactly who she is. Some women in the west hid who they were, such as Charely Parkhurst. Others, Like Lucile, did not.

 

One of the biggest freedoms women of the west enjoyed, was the ability to not only own land, but to retain it if their husband died or divorced them. This was not the case in other areas of the country. In Along a Tangled Path, Will was treated as chattel by her father as she was growing up and she associates happiness with ownership. She doesn’t want a husband, she wants land. Where she came from, land could be taken if a husband decided to divorce her. So, part of her motivation to act like a man is not only for respect, but because it suits her goal.

I love a strong heroine, but does that make the hero weak? I don’t think so. Charles was so much fun to write as Will’s foil. He’s trying to protect her secret and his heart all at once. He respects her, but it’s important he act as a traditional cowboy hero should and he must protect her above her secret.

For more information on cowgirls of the west, you can click HERE
And to find out more about Lucile you can click HERE  or HERE

Giveaway!! An autographed copy of Along a Tangled Path will be given away to one commenter. Let’s discuss: Do you love a strong female heroine or a more traditional Victorian heroine?

 

 

Kari Trumbo is a bestselling author of Christian and sweet romance. 

She writes swoony heroes and places that become characters with historical detail and heart.
She’s a stay-at-home mom to four vibrant children. When she isn’t writing, or editing, she home schools her children and pretends to keep up with them. 

Kari loves reading, listening to contemporary Christian music, singing when no one’s listening, and curling up near the wood stove when winter hits. She makes her home in central Minnesota, land of frigid toes and mosquitoes the size of compact cars, with her husband of over twenty years. They have two daughters, two sons, one cat, and one hungry wood stove.

 

You can find Kari at the following links:

Facebook      Bookbub     Website     Amazon                                   

Link to book

 

 

Guest Blogger
Updated: April 8, 2019 — 7:33 pm

Holy Week


A timeline of Easter

This goes alllll the way back.

In the 8th Century BC, this is 800 years before Jesus was born, the Israeli Passover occurred. Jews at this time are being kept in slavery in Egypt. When Moses told Pharoah to Let My People Go and Pharoah refused, thus began the Ten Plagues of Egypt. The last plague, the Plague of the First Born…The Angel of Death ‘passed over’ all Jewish homes, and killed the first born son of every other household. Pharoah’s son died and Pharoah freed all the Jewish slaves. Passover became a Jewish high holy day and remains so to this day.

Around 30 AD, that is 30-some years after Jesus’ birth…church tradition says he died when he was 33…Jesus goes to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover.  While he is there he is arrested, unjustly accused of crimes, sentenced to death, is crucified, dead and buried. After three days he rises from the dead on what is the first Easter.

 

325 AD during the reign of Roman Emperor Constantine I, he calls the Council of Nicea, from which emerges the Nicean Creed and a date celebrating Easter that is the first Sunday after the Spring Equinox. This is why Easter changes from year to year. Celebrations of Easter before this time were always tied to Passover but this new degree separates the two, though they still occasionally align.

In the 13th Century a tradition of observing Lent begins to not eat eggs during the Lenten season. This begins the tradition of eating eggs on Easter Sunday with some festivity.

In the 18th Century, the tradition of the Easter Bunny arrives in America from Germany. Eggs, chicks, bunnies are all symbols of fertility and renewed life. Boiling and brightly decorating the eggs is part of the Easter celebration.

 

The 19th Century Easter celebrations include Easter egg hunts and Easter egg rolls for children.

 

In the mid-19th Century women dressed in elaborate hats and pretty spring dresses are asked to promenade down 5th Avenue in New York City after church services, beginning the tradition of the Easter Parade.

 

1885 This is the first year of the celebrated jewel-encrusted Faberge eggs. They are remembered as the extravagantly expensive Easter gifts given to the Russian Czars to their wives and mothers. And, at this point, could we POSSIBLY have removed any trace of Jesus’ sacrifice and his miraculous resurrection from the story of Easter?

 

In the 1930s jelly beans were added to Easter baskets.

In the 1970s Peeps were invented. There are 700 million Peeps produced each year and, of course, this little (blick) treat is now made in Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas shapes and various other atrocities. (I found Patriotic Peeps…Google helped me…for shame)

Mark 16:5 And entering the tomb, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, dressed in a white robe; and they were amazed. 6 And he said to them, “Do not be amazed; you seek Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has risen.”

 

HAPPY EASTER FROM MARY CONNEALY

 

 

Mary Connealy
Author of Romantic Comedy...with Cowboys including the bestselling Kincaid Brides Series
http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules
Updated: April 17, 2019 — 10:27 pm

Kari Trumbo Returns on Friday!

Miss Kari Trumbo will visit the Junction on Friday, April 19, 2019!

She’s going to talk about strong female characters–what makes them that way and how much we like them. It’ll be fun.

You’ll be happy to note that she’s toting an autographed copy to give away!

Yippee! We love those freebies.

Come Friday, head over and join the party.

We’ll have a lot of laughter and a mighty good time.

If you’ve never been to one of our parties you’re missing out!

*~ *~ *~ *

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: April 16, 2019 — 11:55 am

Go-Carts and Baby Carriages

Recently, I was diving deep into research for a story set in 1913. 

Among the resource books piled on my desk was my trusty reproduction copy of a 1908 Sears, Roebuck & Co Catalog. I love all the little everyday details I can unearth in its many pages! 

I was searching for baby gear that day. Partly because it tied into the story I was writing (the heroine is a nanny to three little ones), and party because I’ve had baby on the brain for the last few months as we awaited the arrival of my niece’s first baby. 

In particular, I was interested in a description of baby carriages.

 

I wanted to see images of what they would have looked like during that time period.

Did they have any unique features or selling points? What would make a young mother decide to purchase this option or that one?

I had grand visions of ornate carriages with flowery details. 

What I didn’t anticipate was to be so surprised by the product description. 

Notice anything strange in the description?

They called them Go-Carts! 

I had no idea they’d ever been labeled as go-carts. 

On the following page they had advertisements for baby carriages. 

I studied both pages for a while, reading the descriptions, trying to figure out what the difference could be.

At first I thought that perhaps a carriage meant the baby could rest flat and a go-cart meant they were sitting upright. But the go-carts advertise being able to recline.

Then it a light bulb went off. I think the difference is that go-carts can be moved into different positions and many of them could be folded flat (how handy!) like a stroller. 
I tried to dig up some research to either confirm my idea or dash it, but I have yet to find anything that talks about go-carts from Victorian or Edwardian days. 

I did find an interesting history of baby carriages, though. 
William Kent, a landscape architect, designed the first carriage in 1733. It was created for the children of the Duke of Devonshire. Kent constructed a shell-shaped  basket on wheels the children could sit in and be pulled by a goat or pony. 

Wealthy families were Kent’s primary customers. 

The 19th century was a time when parks and recreational spaces were enjoyed as family strolls became popular. An economical way to take babies along needed to be developed. 

Benjamin Potter Crandall manufactured a new design in the early 1800s. He claimed his baby carriages were the first manufactured in the US, although it’s been argued

 the F.A. Whitney Carriage Company may hold the title. At any rate, Crandall developed a style that could could be pushed rather than pulled. His design was largely rejected. His son son, Jesse, eventually took over the business and made some additions, including a brake and added a model that folded as well as parasols and accessories. Reportedly, Queen Victoria purchased three of them which made his designs a must-have for mothers everywhere. 

Carriages were built of wood or wicker and held together with expensive brass joints. Often, they turned into ornamented works of arts. 

Models were named after royalty, like Princess and Duchess.

Charles Burton created the first “pram” or perambulator. It had a three-wheel push design and looked a little like an arm chair on big spoke wheels. Customers found it unwieldy and complained about the design, but Burton was determined to succeed. He took his design to England where he found popularity once the royals began using it. In the UK, the word pram is used to describe a carriage, because of the popularity of the perambulator.

In 1889, William H. Richardson patented the idea of the first reversible carriage. The bassinet was designed to face out or in toward the parent. Until that point, the axis didn’t allow each wheel to move separately, but Richard’s design increased maneuverability. 

Before long, go-carts were being advertised that could fold flat, recline and more. 

As the new century advanced, so did improvements with baby carriages and strollers until we reached today’s models, filled with accessories and safety features. 

If you’d like to find out more about the story that necessitated this research, look for Evie, coming May 23! It’s available now for pre-order on Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/y4gnadrk 

Will love bloom between a spunky nanny and a distracted landscaper?

Unconventional nanny Evie Caswell views it as her duty to bring fun and laughter to the residence of her strict, aloof employers. Full of life and spirit, she is determined to teach the couple’s children how to be young and carefree. With hardly a minute to herself, she long ago surrendered her dreams of having her own home and a family. Then her employer hires Flynn Elliott, a landscape architect, to turn the yard into a spectacular garden. Enchanted with the intriguing man, Evie realizes after meeting Flynn nothing in her life will ever be the same.

Renowned for his landscape designs and ability to make anything grow, Flynn Elliott is a bit of an enigma. He spouts romantic poetry to the plants in his greenhouse and stealthily avoids social interactions, yet can charm birds right out of the trees when the need arises. While his sister handles the finer details of their business, he often loses himself in his work, forgetting the outside world exists. A chance encounter with a beautiful woman in a moonlit garden leaves him seeking opportunities to discover more about the effervescent Evie and the joy she radiates to those around her.

Will the two of them be able to set aside their doubts and fears to embrace a happily ever after?

Brimming with lighthearted moments, snippets of history, and the hope of true love, Evie is a sweet historical romance sure to warm your heart. 

~*~

Oh, and if you’re wondering, my niece and her sweet husband welcomed a bouncing baby boy April 2! I was there for his arrival, but can’t wait to return for a visit and hold Baby T again! 

~*~

If any of you know any history about the difference in go-carts and baby carriages, I’d love to learn more.

In the meantime, feel free to share your favorite “baby” item. What makes your heart pitter-patter and think of babies when you see it? A blanket? An adorable pair of booties? Sweet little onesies?

 

Shanna Hatfield
After spending her formative years on a farm in Eastern Oregon, hopeless romantic Shanna Hatfield turns her rural experiences into sweet historical and contemporary romances filled with sarcasm, humor, and hunky western heroes.
When this USA Today bestselling author isn’t writing or covertly hiding decadent chocolate from the other occupants of her home, Shanna hangs out with her beloved husband, Captain Cavedweller.