Tag: guest author

Welcome, Heather Blanton

Today we’re happy to welcome Heather Banton! Today Heather will tell you about her book, A Good Man Comes Around, and she will give away three copies of her book to three winners. If you prefer, you can choose a book from her back list. Welcome, Heather!

In the Tragedy, Find the Blessings…

Greed is good.

Greed is good?

Hardly. But the 19th-century discoveries of gold and silver inarguably drew men by the thousands to the American West. Some prospectors were good. Some were bad. All played their part in settling America’s frontier.

As I researched gold rushes for a few previous books, I was struck by one man’s random, utterly stunning gold strike, and the way it impacted his life. His tale is the basis for my book, , the expanded version releasing today!

 

Oliver Martin was one of the few men in the goldfields who was there more out of directionless boredom than Gold Fever. Ostensibly, he was in the gold camps to strike it rich. The fact was, though, Oliver was a good-for-nothing slacker who didn’t even own a pan. Hard work didn’t pull his trigger. He meandered around boom towns like El Dorado and Yuba, panning, drinking, doing odd jobs, but mostly, drinking. Drifting, lost, he had no real plans for his life.

Then tragedy struck. And in nearly the same instant, Oliver was handed an incredible, amazing blessing. I mean, a jaw-dropping fork in his road.

 

After an accident, the young man had to bury his lifeless best friend in the wilds of the Sierra Mountains. Grief-stricken and with no conscious thought to location, he merely chose the first spot he saw. Along a bustling creek, he dropped to his knees and started clawing at the sand. He had not dug down two feet when he found a nugget of gold that weighed in at over eighty-five pounds.

Eighty. Five. Pounds.

In modern money, the rock had an approximate value of $650,000. Digging less than a foot in any direction and Oliver would have missed the nugget entirely.

I was fascinated by this turn of events in the man’s life. Wham! Suddenly he had a pot of gold sitting in his lap. He had gained something of great value yet lost something priceless, irreplaceable, in one fell swoop. I thought of Job—God blessing him, then Satan cursing him.

Receiving an overwhelming financial windfall is definitely a blessing or a curse. Depends on how you use it. We know most of these stories don’t end well. The goldfields were killing fields, rife with thievery, murder, and mayhem. And even when the prospectors managed to hang on to their money, they often spent it on riotous living before they could get out of the mountains.

Oliver found himself facing an unfamiliar choice: squander the unimaginable wealth or use it wisely, to become a better person, maybe make the world a better place.

What would he do? He had spent much of his life breaking promises, abusing friends, and running from God. Now it was time for him to examine his heart. He was still reeling from the painful loss of his friend. How could his future be so bright and yet so grim? Was it even in him to be a better man?

Meanwhile, God was working on someone else’s heart. Moved by Oliver’s tragedy, Abigail Holt, the mail-order bride Oliver had rejected, offered him friendship and forgiveness.

So, the question is, did Oliver go the way of so many lottery winners? Did he drink and gamble the money into oblivion? Loan it to moneygrubbing friends more lost than he? Or did he grow up and find the path God had for him? Did Abigail play any part in his choices?

I hope you’ll read releasing today and find out what drew me to this true Gold Rush story.

What about you? Have you or anyone you know been able to look past an enormous tragedy and find a blessing in it? Comment to win your paperback copy OR any paperback by me of your choosing! I’ll do THREE (3) winners!

Welcome, Ann Roth!

We are so happy to welcome Ann Roth to the Junction. Today Ann will introduce us to her stories and give away a copy of each of her 2-in-1 novels, which means there will be two lucky winners!  Welcome, Ann!

Hey there, wonderful readers, and happy January!

Don’t you love ranchers and the ranching life? I do, and this month I have two 2-in-1 previously published books from Harlequin, both set in Montana ranching country. “Home On the Ranch, Montana Beginnings,” features two Ann Roth books set on ranches in fictional Prosperity, Montana: A Rancher’s Honor and A Rancher’s Redemption.

To whet your appetite, check out these teasers.

A Rancher’s Honor:

There’s no room in daycare owner Lana’s life for casual flings. After all, her dream of adopting a baby is closer than ever to becoming a reality. So why is she still mooning over the sexy cowboy who made her forget everything but the strong, sure feel of his arms around her?

It wasn’t supposed to be more than one unforgettable night between consenting strangers. But when Sly spots Lana’s photo in the local paper, he grabs at the chance to see her again. The guarded rancher is falling hard for her, but it can only end in heartbreak. Unless Sly can trust Lana with the secrets that keep him from believing that just maybe, they could have a future together.

A Rancher’s Redemption

Since she was a teen, there’s been one guy that restaurateur Dani can always count on—her best friend, Nick. Their relationship is purely platonic…that is until a single kiss changes everything. Now Dani is falling hard for the one man she shouldn’t fall for—the one who can truly break her heart.

Nick accepts that he’s to blame for a string of failed relationships. Dani is the only woman he’s ever trusted. He doesn’t want to be just another guy who lets her down, but his new feelings for her are too strong to resist. Do they dare risk their lifelong friendship for a once-in-a-lifetime love?

The second 2-in-1, “Home on the Ranch, A Match Made in Montana,” includes The Rancher She Loved, set in fictional Saddlers Prairie, and a book from author Joanna Sims.

Here’s your teaser for The Rancher She Loved:

Learning she was adopted is the biggest shock of magazine writer Sarah’s life. Falling for champion bull rider Clay is a close second. Years ago, she shared a sizzling kiss with the handsome rodeo star, only to hear that he was a player.

But as Sarah searches for her birth mother, Clay is unexpectedly by her side. Can this really be the same man she considers a womanizer? As she gets closer to learning the stunning truth about her biological mom, Sarah also finds herself growing closer to Clay. Her head tells her it’s a mistake…but her heart isn’t so sure.

A little about me:

I live in the Pacific Northwest with my own hero. I met him in college, and we’ve been married for umpteen years.

Who doesn’t love a happy ending? Especially when two characters are so right for each other but don’t know it. I like to set my stories in small towns, where folks are nosy but also care about each other.

To date, I have published over 35 novels, as well as several short stories and novellas, through both New York publishers and as an indie author.

For a list of my novels and to sign up for my newsletter and get a free book, visit my website

I love hearing from readers! Email me at ann@annroth.net.

Be sure to check out my Facebook page

I’m also on Twitter: @Ann_Roth

And Instagram: annrothauthor

 

QUILTING MYTHS by MARY DAVIS

I would like to shine a light on five quilting myths most of us have believed to be true at one time or another.

QUILTING MYTH #1 ~ A common task for women during Colonial America times was quilting.

In Colonial times, quilting wasn’t a task of necessity or frugality. It was a pastime of the wealthy. The cottons and silks used in quilting at the time were expensive imported fabrics. Those who could afford the fine textiles quilted, but the ordinary person in early America was hard pressed to keep their family in clothes with days spent spinning, weaving, knitting, sewing, and various other chores for survival. No time for something as frivolous as quilting.

Around 1840 with the industrial revolution, the widespread production of affordable textiles made fabric plentiful and available for more women. As textiles were being mass-produced, some fabrics went from $5 a yard to 5-cents a yard.


                                                                        Quilt from Elko Museum

QUILTING MYTH #2 ~The Underground Railroad used special quilt designs & patterns as signals.

This myth has great romantic appeal. I love the idea of slaves escaping from the South knowing where to find safe refuge by a quilt hung on a clothesline or a special block pattern in a window. But research on the Underground Railroad has found no evidence of such a practice.

QUILTING MYTH #3 ~ Scraps used for quilting was a frugal measure.

This myth implies that most if not all quilts were a product of needing to be frugal. Most women of the past bought fabrics specifically for making a quilt, much as we do today. True, they also used scraps from worn-out clothing or the leftovers from making garments, but they most used new fabric purchased for the quilt. Women didn’t use the worn-out portion of cloth because they would already be—well, worn out. The quilt would damage or tear easily, and all that work would be fruitless.

The frugal quilter theory suggests that quilting was out of necessity only. Many quilts were far too elaborate to be made for daily use. However, simpler quilts were made for everyday.


An old quilt my grandma made decades ago

QUILTING MYTH #4 ~ To show humility, mistakes were intentionally made in quilts from yesteryear.

Intentional mistakes in old (or new) quilts was never a common practice. All quilters make mistakes. It’s nearly impossible to make a perfect quilt no matter how hard one tries.

However, there are mistakes in quilts that have been put there purposefully, possibly for religious reasons or superstition.

It is believed that Amish and Mennonite women put a mistake in each quilt because it would be prideful to make something perfect, because only God is perfect. But to include a mistake on purpose would presuppose that one believed herself to be perfect and that would be prideful.

So, when you find a mistake in a quilt, it’s unlikely to have been made on purpose. It’s just the quilt maker being human.

QUILTING MYTH #5 ~ While migrating west, pioneer women pieced blocks and quilted.

On the long trek westward, a woman rarely worked on a quilt. Any able-bodied person, including women and children, walked most of the roughly 1,500 miles, so doing any form of sewing would have been pretty much impossible during the day. If a woman would have been fortunate enough to travel in the wagon the rough ride would have made fine sewing nearly impossible.

Once stopped at the end of a long day, there were many chores to be done; tending to the livestock, gathering wood, cooking, and so much more. If a woman had any energy after all that, the poor evening light would have made sewing hard, and so they preferred knitting that could be done in low light. Though a few pioneer women might have pieced blocks together for a quilt along the journey, it was uncommon.

So there you have it, five quilting myths that are sadly not true.

I’M GIVING AWAY A DIGITAL COPY OF THE WIDOW’S PLIGHT TODAY TO ONE LUCKY COMMENTER!

MARY DAVIS is a bestselling, award-winning novelist of over two dozen titles in both historical and contemporary themes. She has five titles releasing in 2018; “Holly & Ivy” in A Bouquet of Brides Collection in January, Courting Her Amish Heart in March, The Widow’s Plight in July, Courting Her Secret Heart September, & “Zola’s Cross-Country Adventure” in MISSAdventure Brides Collection in December. She’s a member of ACFW and active in critique groups.

Mary lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband of over thirty-three years and two cats. She has three adult children and two incredibly adorable grandchildren.

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THE WIDOW’S PLIGHT ~ A sweet historical romance that will tug at your heart. This is book 1 in the Quilting Circle series. Washington State, 1893


When Lily Lexington Bremmer arrives in Kamola with her young son, she’s reluctant to join the social center of her new community, the quilting circle, but the friendly ladies pull her in. She begins piecing a sunshine and shadows quilt because it mirrors her life. She has a secret that lurks in the shadows and hopes it doesn’t come out into the light. Dark places in her past are best forgotten, but her new life is full of sunshine. Will her secrets cast shadows on her bright future?

Widower Edric Hammond and his father are doing their best to raise his two young daughters. He meets Lily and her son when they arrive in town and helps her find a job and a place to live. Lily resists Edric’s charms at first but finds herself falling in love with this kind, gentle man and his two darling daughters. Lily has stolen his heart with her first warm smile, but he’s cautious about bringing another woman into his girls’ lives due to the harshness of their own mother. Can Edric forgive Lily her past to take hold of a promising chance at love?

THE WIDOW’S PLIGHT releases in ebook on July 1 and will be out in paperback by mid-June.

Buy link:http://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CV4XDLH/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1525466464&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=mary+davis+the+widow%27s+light%3C%2Fa%3E&tag=pettpist-20

Guest ~ Rosanne Bittner!


Rosanne BittnerLook who has returned to Wildflower Junction!
From “The Heart of the West”…
I am tickled pink to welcome Rosanne Bittner to the corral!

flower bar 1

Well, by the time this blog is posted I will have just returned from the big Romantic Times conference at the RIO in Las Vegas! As of this writing I’m not there yet, but I know it will be a blast, and I’ll get to meet Linda Broday! I’m so happy to finally meet her, and we have a lot to talk about!

 

WITH LINDA BRODAY AT RT

WITH LINDA BRODAY AT RT

Thank you for having me back. I love the blog name Petticoats and Pistols – so perfect for those of us who write westerns!  And westerns are my favorite (and pretty much my only) genre. I have written about the Revolutionary War era, the Civil War era, the French and Indian Wars, the Mexican War, the Alamo, the building of the Union Pacific, the founding of Denver, Colorado, the very early years of Chicago, the gold rushes, silver rushes, the stagecoach era, the Indian wars, the land rushes in Oklahoma, the gradual demise of most of our Native American tribes, the War of 1812, outlaws and lawmen, vigilantes and bounty hunters, ranchers and townsmen, and everything in between.  I guess you can see what I love – American History and for the most part – the Old West.

 

Outlaw HeartsSome call my westerns gritty and sexy – and I love both descriptions. No “fluff” here.  Few “Mr. Nice-Guys.” Very strong heroines to match very strong heroes who take no sh—but definitely know how to treat a woman! And through it all there is always a very strong, very touching and always memorable love story that stays with my readers long after they put down the book.

 

One of my best love stories was between Zeke and Abbie Monroe in my 7-book SAVAGE DESTINY series – over 30 years old and still selling! Now I think I’ve matched that great love in my OUTLAW series – OUTLAW HEARTS, DO NOT FORSAKE ME and LOVE’S SWEET REVENGE (coming September 2016). DO NOT FORSAKE ME is up for an award from Romantic Times for Best Historical Novel for 2015. 

 

These three books are about wanted man Jake Harkner, a man haunted by a tortured boyhood and looking for Do Not Forsake Methe love he never had as a child – a man both ruthless and devotedly loving. When Jake meets Miranda Hayes in the first book, it’s as though God brought them together, because it’s Randy who changes Jake’s life forever. Ironically, in the first book Randy is so afraid of Jake that she shoots him! Yet they end up recklessly and hopelessly in love, and Randy bears a hard life for marrying a wanted man who (by book #2) becomes a U.S. Marshal – a man who already had enemies and makes more because of his job – enemies that threaten Jake and the beautiful family he has spawned over the years.

 

LOVE’S SWEET REVENGE continues to bring Jake and his family troubles from his haunted past that won’t leave him alone.  In spite of being tough and rugged on the outside, and damn good with a gun, Jake still experiences the terror and fears of a little boy who lived with a demon for a father, whom Jake killed himself when very young.  His constant inner struggle to hang on to the love he’s found in Randy and his family keeps getting Jake into trouble in his over-zealous attempts to protect them – and sometimes he isn’t just protecting them from cruel enemies – sometimes (in his mind) Jake is protecting them from himself.

 

Loves Sweet RevengeThese “Jake” books are, if I may say so myself, some of my best writing, mainly because I love all the psychology involved.  It’s Jake’s boyhood that controls most of his emotions and actions. In modern times he would need counseling, but in the 1800’s such things were unheard of. Jake’s protection from his past is his gun – and his counselor is the woman he worships and adores – his Miranda. She and his devoted family keep Jake sane and on the straight and narrow … most of the time … until something devastating happens in book #3, LOVE’S SWEET REVENGE. You won’t want to miss it!

 

I am planning a fourth book – THE LAST OUTLAW. Hope my publisher takes it, because Jake’s story is still unfinished.

 

A big thank you to Linda Broday and Petticoats and Pistols – and to all my fans out there who keep asking for more! I’ll keep writing more stories as long as my brain and fingers work! Love to all – and enjoy LOVE’S SWEET REVENGE! Be sure to visit my website at www.rosannebittner.com, where you can “one-click” order many of my books, and read my blogs at www.rosannebittner.blogspot.com. I’m also on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads and many other sites!

 

I’m giving away two sets of my Jake Harkner books. (U.S. only.)

Just leave a comment to enter the drawing.