In Honor of Memorial Day

memorial day

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington, VA

 Memorial Day Definition:

Memorial Day is a US federal holiday wherein the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces are remembered. The holiday, which is celebrated every year on the final Monday of May, was formerly known as Decoration Day and originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. By the 20th century, Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who have died while in the military service. [source: Wikipedia]

Flags should be flown at half-staff until noon, then raised to full  height.

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A wife and mother of three, Sherri’s hobbies include collecting mismatched socks, discovering new ways to avoid cleaning, and standing in the middle of the room while thinking, “Why did I just come in here?” A reformed pessimist and recent hopeful romantic, Sherri has a passion for writing. Her books are fun and fast-paced, with plenty of heart and soul. Write to Sherri at P.O. Box 116, Elkhorn, NE, 68022, email at sherri@sherrishackelford.com or visit sherrishackelford.com.

5 thoughts on “In Honor of Memorial Day”

  1. Thanks, Sherri, for putting this up on this day of remembrance. I’m so very grateful for all the men and women who have died for our country and also for those who are far from home serving, standing guard so that we might be free.

  2. Thanks Sherri for putting this up. I think we all have known at least one who has died while serving in the military. If not they should be grateful. Let us honor our men and women who served and died. I am grateful for their sacrifice.

  3. For a time, Memorial Day celebrations seemed to fall off. It is nice to see more communities bringing back the parades and other celebration and remembrances. It is sad that we are adding more to the roll of the fallen every year. It will truly be a time to celebrate when those we remember and honor died only in the distant past.

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