Tag: Jeannie Watt

Learning to Love the Camas Root

I grew up in the Palouse area of Idaho, close to the Camas Prairie, and when I was in the third grade, while we were studying the Nez Perce Indians, I ate a cookie made with camas root flour. I can taste it to this day–and not in a good way.  It might have been the cook, it might have been the camas root flour. I don’t know, but that cookie did not agree with me. Interestingly, Lewis and Clark had a similar experience.

Before I tell you about Lewis and Clark, let me give you some background on the camas root. The camas is a blue flowering plant. It’s really quite beautiful and although there are several Camas Prairies, my Camas Prairie is an area in north central Idaho where the Nez Perce gathered camas roots for thousands of years.

The camas root is really a bulb, and it’s higher in protein that some fish. The native peoples would dig the root with sticks or parts of antlers in the early summer months. The time varied depending on the altitude. After the harvest, the camas roots were cooked in earthen ovens. The roots that were not eaten were dried for later consumption. Dried camas root lasted for years. There are stories of travelers eating camas roots that were more than thirty years old.

It was very important to only harvest the blue camas bulbs, because the white camas bulbs, which are also nutritious, closely resembled another species of camas known as White Death. The White Death could be lethal if enough was consumed, so white camas plants were generally avoided.

 So what happened to Lewis and Clark?

When the explorers reached the Weippe Prairie in Idaho in September of 1805, they were essentially starving. The Nez Perce fed the men camas roots, which were described as “sweet and good to the taste”. They were also very high in fiber and very hard on the starving men’s digestive systems.  The men fell ill with vomiting, diarrhea and gas. Captain Clark wrote, “Capt Lewis Scercely able to ride on a jentle horse which was furnishd by the Chief. Several men So unwell that they were Compelled to lie on the Side of the road for Some time others obliged to be put on horses.” The sickness lasted over five days, during which time the less weak men took care of the sicker men while making five canoes to travel the Clearwater River. Those guys were tough.

Later it was discovered that fermented camas made a decent beer and the men felt friendlier toward the root. Eventually, their bodies adapted. The men came to like the camas root and took a large supply with them when then traveled down the Clearwater in October 1805.

In researching the camas, I’ve learned that the roasted bulbs taste similar to pumpkin and sweet potato, both of which I hated as a kid, and that, I believe, was the source of my issues with the root. I would try a camas flour cookie again, given the chance. And hopefully, like Lewis and Clark, I would come to appreciate this historically valuable food source.

Wedding Dresses in the Mid to Late 1800s

Hello everyone!  I hope you’re having a great Wednesday!

I was just asked by a dear friend to make her wedding dress, so I have wedding dresses on the brain. I’m making a classic white wedding dress, but white dresses have only been classic since the 1840s, when Queen Victoria wore a white court dress to marry Prince Albert. After the royal wedding, white became “the” bridal color for elite weddings on both sides of the Atlantic.

Meanwhile, on the western frontier, practicality prevailed. Frontier brides-to-be did not have extensive wardrobes. It was not uncommon for a bride to be married in her best calico dress. Another option was to borrow a “good” dress from a family member. The borrowed dress was often well worn, but a step up from everyday calico.

If fabric was available and the bride was lucky enough to be able to sew a new dress for her wedding, she would have used that dress for multiple occasions throughout her life. She probably would have lent the dress to friends and relatives, and passed it  down to the next generation. The dress, for practical reasons, would not have been white.  Can you imagine trying to keep a white dress in suitable shape to wear on multiple occasions in a frontier environment? Many wedding dresses were brown, gray or black, but red and blue and gold were also popular colors.

Wedding dress 1863. Image courtesy of Idaho State Historical Society. Catalog # 1971.119.3/1-3

The dress on the left below is from the 1860s. I couldn’t find a date for the dress on the right, but it’s obviously late 1800s.

The dresses shown below were made for wealthier brides.  The red dress is from 1881. The gold dress is from 1884 and made of silk and cotton. The brown dress is from 1879, as is the rust dress next to it.

                         

After looking at these beautiful dresses, I kind of wish colored wedding dresses would come back into style. They’re so pretty and somehow seem more unique.

 

Do you like colored wedding dresses, or are you a fan of the now classic white dress?

A BAD BOY WITH A GOOD HEART 

Widow Skye Larkin will do anything to save her ranch, even if it means accepting help from bad-boy bull rider Tyler Hayward. But he and his penchant for partying are to blame for her late husband’s financial indiscretions, which got her into this mess. She might be attracted to the dark, dangerous cowboy, but putting her trust in another rodeo man is unthinkable. 

Ty knows he shouldn’t be surprised that Skye isn’t convinced he’s changed. He wants to prove that beneath the bravado, and no matter what happened on the circuit, he’s one of the good guys. Offering her a business partnership is just the first step. What will she do when he offers her his heart?

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Jeannie Watt 25th Book, Twins and a Give Away!

Hello everyone! I’m so excited to announce the release of my 25th Harlequin, A Bull Rider to Depend On. It was really exciting to receive the notification, because I had miscounted. I thought A Bull Rider to Depend On was my 24th book. Math never was my strong point.

To celebrate this milestone, I’m posting an excerpt and giving a way an autographed copy of the book to someone who comments. Yay!

A little background before the excerpt. Tyler and Jess Hayward are bull riding twins. Tyler is the wild child and Jess is the responsible twin. Tyler has had a crush on Skye Larkin forever, but Skye never approved of his wild ways and eventually married one of his friends.

Now Skye is a widow and in deep financial trouble. Ty offers to help, only to discover that Skye thinks he encouraged her late husband to gamble away the ranch emergency fund. He’s just discovered that she blames him for the state she’s in and he’s not going to have it…

Skye started walking toward where Ty stood beside his truck, stony expression firmly in place. Her hair was pulled into a sophisticated looking bun thing instead of tumbling around her shoulders in dark waves as usual, and she wore a light blue dress with sensible heels.

He instantly surmised that she’d been to another bank and that things had not gone well. Ty told himself he didn’t care.

“Hello, Tyler.” She came to a stop a few feet away from him, just as she had the day before, and adjusted the position of the purse strap on her shoulder, keeping her fingers lightly curled around the black leather.

“Skye.”

“What brings you here today?”

Coolly spoken words, but Ty read uncertainty in her expression. Guilt, perhaps…?

“I’m for sure not here to offer you money.” He took a lazy step forward. “I want you to set the record straight.”

“What record?”

His voice grew hard as he said, “Where do you come off telling people that I’m trying to buy a clear conscience?”

Skye gaped at him. “What?”

He cocked his head. “What part needs repeating?”

“I never told anyone you were trying to buy a clear conscience.”

“Well, that’s the story going around, Skye. I wonder how it started?”  He took another step forward, doing his best to ignore the fact that she looked utterly confused. “I tried to help you, Skye. I wanted to help you. It had nothing—not one thing—to do with my conscience.”

Her chin went up at that. “Nothing?”

He shook his head, realizing then just how deeply engrained her dislike of him was. She was never going to believe anything but the worst of him and he wasn’t going to try to convince her otherwise. “I’m wasting my time here.” He turned and started back across the drive toward his truck, cursing his stupidity in driving to her ranch. The damage was done. And realistically, he’d never expected her to be able to make the situation better, but he wanted her to know what she’d done so that she didn’t do it again. Mission accomplished.

He jerked the truck door open, then, because this could well be the last time they ever spoke, he said, “For the record, I never gambled with your husband.”

An expression of patent disbelief crossed Skye’s face, but before she could speak, he said, “I know it’s really handy to blame me, since you’ve never cared for me. I’m a nice easy target to make you feel better about things, but here’s the deal—I don’t gamble.”

“Ever?”

“More like never as in…never.”

“You’re saying my husband lied to me.”

Sorry, Mason, but the roosters have come home to roost. “I’m saying he used me as an excuse.”

“You never partied with him.”

“Of course I partied with him. We drank together. A lot. But we never went gambling.”

She looked at him as if he was missing the point. “If Mason had stayed in at night, if he hadn’t drunk too much, then he wouldn’t have gambled. But would you leave him alone? No.”

“He never once said anything about wanting to stay in.” That was the honest truth. “He never acted like he wanted to stay in.” And Tyler hadn’t seen the danger of encouraging him to go out until it was too late. But Mason would have gone out no matter what. Tyler was convinced of that.

“Or you’re not presenting things the way they really were.”

Ty’s eyes narrowed. “Why would I present things any other way?” In other words, why would he lie?

“I don’t know. Guilt, maybe? Public image?”

“I’m not lying, Skye. I know you believe that I’m the reason you’re broke. I’m the reason Mason had hangovers. Yes, you asked me to leave him alone. No, I didn’t do it. But I didn’t encourage him to gamble and lose all of his money—or to gamble some more to try and make it all back. That was fully his thing.”

Tyler’s jaw tightened as he fought the urge to tell Skye the whole truth. To tell her what her husband was like on the road. To tell her that gambling wasn’t the only vice Mason indulged in.

But angry as he was, he couldn’t do that to her.

He also couldn’t handle being in her presence any longer. “You want to hide behind a lie? Fine. Have a good life, Skye.” The words came out bitterly, as if he cared in some way about what she thought, but he didn’t.

“You too,” Skye said in a stony voice, before walking past him, her heels tilting in the gravel as she made her way around his truck. She was almost directly in front of the vehicle when she stopped dead in her tracks.

Ty followed her line of vision and instantly saw the problem. One of her horses was down, next to the water trough, and from the way it was lying with its neck stretched out and its head at an odd angle, he didn’t think it was napping. He got back out of his truck at the same moment that Skye started running toward the pasture in her heels.

He might be angry. He might have been happy to never see Skye again. But no way was he going to drive away when she had a horse down.

The horse needed help even if Skye didn’t.

***

Yes, I know–Skye seems kind of cranky. She’s scared and hurting, but eventually she comes around.  Tyler becomes the man he needs to be and she learns to trust again. I just turned in Jess’s book and had as much fun writing the responsible twin as the wild twin. I guess that’s because I gave him a heroine to drive him nuts.

And to complete my twin theme–we just had twin calves! It was very touch-and-go saving them, since it was breach birth to begin with, but they’re thriving now. Here are the adorable little guys minutes after birth.

This is me in full farm gear!

Do you know any twins? If they were identical, did you find them hard to tell apart once you knew them? I’m looking forward to reading your answers! I’ll post a winner on Saturday.

Spring Branding

On the ranch, spring means new calves! It’s an exciting time to see all the babies that have to be vaccinated and marked for identification. Believe it or not, cattle rustling is still common, so the mark is a necessary measure to keep cattle with their rightful owner.

Today we do our best to handle our animals with the least amount of stress possible. We freeze brand instead of hot brand. The freeze brand kills the hair follicle and the new hair that comes in is white, so instead of a scar, the animal has white hair in the shape of the brand. The freeze is accomplished by mixing dry ice and alcohol. The special iron is soaked in this solution in a cooler, and when it comes out, it’s extremely cold. Getting a freeze brand can be compared to removing a wart with liquid nitrogen.

Here are some photos from last spring’s branding:

First the cattle are brought in and the calves sorted out.

The calves are moved through a chute and put onto a rotating table, which is eased onto its side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once on its side, the calf gets the necessary vaccinations and the mark is applied. The record keeper marks down the ear tag number and the sex, and any important notes about the animal. If the animal has any injuries or concerns, they are dealt with then.

After the calve is marked and innoculated, it is released to return to its mother.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Branding is an activity shared by family, friends and neighbors. Everyone pitches in and afterward there’s a big dinner. This gathering of neighbors and friends is very important in communities where ranches are often separated by many miles, and many hands are needed to accomplish an necessary task.

 

Parade Saddles

Hello everyone and happy Wednesday!

When I was a kid, my idea of some kind of wonderful was a palomino horse and a black and silver parade saddle. If I’d been blessed with a palomino horse and a parade saddle, I would have ridden around the countryside, solving crimes and helping people…but no.

I didn’t get my palomino or parade saddle. What I did get a very cute black pony named Bunny and we won a dollar in the Sandpoint, Idaho July 4th parade in a year I will not specify. In that same parade was a riding group that did indeed have parade saddles. I remember coveting them.

Now that I’m older, I still love parade saddles, but I doubt I’ll ever own one. I can’t see where I’d ever use one, and more than that, I can’t see how I would fit one into my budget. But I can tell you a few things about them.

These saddles were most popular in the 1950s and 60s and they were made to stand out. Because they were covered with so much bling, they tended to be larger than the average saddle, with wide skirts and tapaderos, which are the stirrup covers. Silver was the bling of choice, which made the saddles very heavy. The saddle often had a matching breast collar and perhaps even a bridle.

One of the most famous parade saddle makers was Ed Bohlin, a master craftsman in both silver and leather and had superb carving skills. He was born in Sweden in 1895 and came to America at the age of 15. He worked cattle drives in Montana and then started his first saddle shop in Cody, Wyoming. He met Tom Mix in Los Angeles and Tom convinced him to stay in the area and set up shop there. Ed made over 12,000 saddles, many of which were featured in the Rose Parade. He also dressed and outfitted numerous movie stars.

I did a quick eBay search and found a Bohlin saddle for sale for almost as much as my first house cost. It was beautiful, both as a saddle and as a piece of history.

So I must ask…what piece of western memorabilia would you like to own?

Out of the Blue of the Western Sky Comes…Sky King!

When I was a little girl, we got only one television channel. Fortunately, it was the channel with Roy Rogers, The Lone Ranger and Sky King. As a kid, I ranked these shows in the same order I just listed them. Roy was, without a doubt, the king of my Saturday television lineup. The Lone Ranger second, and Sky King third. The reason? Why Sky didn’t ride a horse. He flew an airplane. His niece, Penny, rode a horse, however, so that made the show worthy of my attention.

Looking back, however, I think Sky had the most interesting premise–to someone who hasn’t put on her cowgirl shirt in preparation for a Saturday spent with her heroes. The show may have been based on Jack Cones, The Flying Constable of Twenty Nine Palms, California, although that has not been verified.  The hero of the show, was Schuyler “Sky” King, a former military pilot. He lived on the Flying Crown Ranch in Arizona with his niece, Penny,  played by Gloria Winters, and nephew, Clipper, played by Ron Hagerthy. Like many ranchers living in remote areas, he had a small Cessna airplane, Songbird, but in addition to checking the herds, the condition of the range, and traveling to town for supplies, Sky also used his plan to capture criminals and spies, solve crimes and  find people who lost their way in the desert. He had help in the form of the local sheriff, Mitch, played by Ewing Mitchell.

During the half hour show, people would get themselves into trouble, and with the help of the Songbird, Sky would rescue them. I particularly remember Penny getting into a boatload of trouble. She was forever getting captured, and that kept me on the edge of my seat, wondering how Sky was going to get her out of this mess.

The radio show ran from 1946 to 1954 and the television version, starring Grant Kirby as Sky, started in 1951. For a time the radio and television versions ran simultaneously. The television version lasted until 1962. According to Wikipedia, “the plot lines were often simplistic, but Grant was able to bring a casual, natural treatment of technical details, leading to a level of believability not found in other TV series involving aviation or life in the American West. Likewise, villains and other characters were usually depicted as intelligent and believable, rather than as two-dimensional. The writing was generally above the standard for contemporary half-hour programs, although sometimes critics suggested that the acting was not.”

Hmm–I remember the acting as being superlative. And if Sky had ridden a horse as often as he flew the plane, Sky King might have bumped The Lone Ranger out of second place in my personal favorites standings. Interestingly, the show was popular in the aviation community, even though it was written for kids, and several astronauts noted it as a show that influenced them as they grew up.

If you remember Sky King, or want to know more, there is an official Sky King website you might want to check out, and all the episodes are also available on DVD. There is also a Sky King Fan Club page.

Quick question–do you remember Sky King? If not, did you have a favorite TV cowboy? Or pilot?

Have a great day!

The Great Die Up

Today I’d like to share information on The Great Cattle Die Up, an ironic take on the term ‘cattle round up’.

Cattle grazing on open range.

During the early 1880s, the summers on the plains of Montana, Wyoming and the Dakotas had been wonderfully cool and winters had proven to be unusually mild, making it easy to feed livestock year around, thus lulling ranchers and beef speculators into a sense of false security. Cattle prices were high, and to increase profits, the ranges were overstocked and soon overgrazed. Beef prices started to fall and the summer of 1867 was unusually hot and dry, making it difficult to put up enough foriage to feed the stock in case the weather took a nasty turn…which it did.

It began to snow on November 13 and snowed every day for a month. The sparse food was hidden beneath the deep snow and the cattle, already in poor condition due to the summer drought, began to die. In January, the temperatures plummeted, perhaps as low as -63°F. A chinook came then, melting the top of the snow, then temperatures fell again, creating a hard crus on top of the deep snow. Stories tell of horses and cattle cut and bleeding from the knees down as they attempted to navigate the crusted snow. Cattle roamed into towns, bawling for food and eating shrubbery. Since little forage had been put up, ranchers had no choice but to watch their herds, their very livelihoods, starve and die.

By spring over 500,000 cattle—90% of the open range animals—had died. The carcasses covered the fields and clogged rivers and streams. The smell of rotting beef permeated the air.

Both small ranches and huge cattle companies declared bankruptcy. Thousands of cowboys were put out of work. Some ranchers tried to steal unbranded calves, leading to range wars. Ultimately, it was the end of open range in the area. Barb wire cut the range into smaller sections, changing the face of Montana ranching forever.

Teddy Roosevelt, prior to the Great Die Up had proclaimed cattle ranching “the pleasantest, healthiest and most exciting phase of American existence.” After the winter of 1887, he wrote to a friend, “Well, we have had a perfect smashup all through the cattle country of the northwest. The losses are crippling. For the first time I have been utterly unable to enjoy a visit to my ranch. I shall be glad to get home.”

Not a very happy story, but a true one that forever changed the face of ranching.

Prairie Cold

I’m no stranger to cold weather. I was born in northern Idaho and I was there for the record cold temperature of -42°F in 1968. My dad was in college and we lived in a house with no insulation to speak of. My bedroom window, frame and all, would occasionally fall into my room if the front door was shut too hard and the nail holding it in wasn’t adjusted just right. I remember my mom putting so many blankets on my bed during that cold snap that once I was under them, I could barely move. The horses started running because of the cold and broke through the fence into the wheat fields. They had to be caught. Good times.

Cows coming in to drink -20F. 

 

Then I moved to northern Nevada, which is also very cold in the winter. On my daughter’s sixth birthday, we woke up to temperatures of -34°F. The pipes were frozen, the truck wouldn’t start. We had a birthday celebration booked at the local McDonald’s. Fortunately, my friend’s truck did start and she was able to pick us up and take us to the party while my husband dealt with hairdryers, heat tapes and engine block heaters.

This fall I moved to Montana. I thought I was ready for the low temperatures—the record so far has been -24°F—but I’d forgotten just how face-burning cold this place can be when one has to go outside a lot. It felt different than the Nevada cold, which made no sense, since we also had numerous below zero days there. A kid at the Mac store in Bozeman cleared it all up for me.  He mentioned that the cold must be a change. I assured him that we had cold weather in Nevada and he quickly said, “That’s desert cold. This is prairie cold.”

He’s right. Prairie cold is colder—which got me wondering about how in the world did the early settlers on the prairie–and I’m thinking the wind-whipped prairies with no mountains in sight–stay warm in those little cabins and sod houses with no wood to stoke the fires? The answer is cattle and buffalo chips and hay twists. The chips are, of course, dried bovine dung. The hay twists are bundles of dry grass twisted together. Both of these fuels burn hot, creating a lot of ash. The fire needs tended full time. One excerpt I read talked about one family member leaving the cabin with a bucket of ashes every time another came in with a load of fuel.

The following excerpt illustrates the ongoing battle of staying warm and cooking with cattle chips.

“Here is the rundown of the operations that mother went through when making baking powder biscuits. … Stoke the stove, get out the flour sack, stoke the stove, wash your hands, mix the biscuit dough, stoke the stove, wash your hands, cut out the biscuits with the top of a baking powder can, stoke the stove, wash your hands, put the pan of biscuits in the oven, keep on stoking the stove until the biscuits are done (not forgetting to wash the hands before taking up the biscuits).”

— From Western Story: The Recollections of Charley O’Kieffe,

1884-1898. Lincoln: U of N Press, 1960.

I am in awe of the men, women and children who weathered the prairie winters back in the day in order to build a better life. I’d like to think I’m tough enough to have endured, as my great-grandmother did, but I’m also very glad I don’t have to find out for real.

What about you? Do you think you could have handled a prairie winter in a cabin or sod house?

New Dicken’s Fair Dress

I’m getting ready for the annual family trek to San Francisco to spend Thanksgiving with the kids. Part of our celebration 2-1involves participating in the Great Dickens Christmas Fair, in costume, of course. It’s so much more fun in costume. Even my  husband, who is not a dress up guy, dresses up for Dickens.

This year howev5er, I had a little bit of problem fitting into the old costume. I was close–as in if I wore a corset, I’d be fine. I don’t want to wear a corset all day, so the only thing I could do was to make a new dress. Fast. In the middle of moving. We do not yet have water in our house, but we have electricity, and that was all I needed to make the sewing machine run.

I chose eggplant taffeta and green velveteen. Victorians love purple and green and I wanted to stay with green accents, since my feathered hat is green and I’m not giving up my hat. When I first laid the fabrics on top of one another, my first thought was “I don’t know…” My second was, “Do you want to wear a corset all day?” So I plunged in.

I choose Simplicity 2887, which is based on a German pattern published in 1863. As you can see, the modern pattern, 2-2created by Kay Gnagey, faithfully recreates the original. You can read more about the original pattern here.

I chose not to put fringe on the tabs, and now, having seen the original, which I did not study before I started to sew, I plan to 4-1redo the skirt tabs so that they are not spaced so far apart. But that is a project for another year. I’m debating about tassels on the buttons. The tassels I bought are too small, but Britex Fabrics is one of my San Francisco stops, so perhaps I will have tassels when I attend the Fair.

The dress is closed by sixteen hook and eye fasteners. I love hand sewing, unless it 7-1involves snaps or hooks and eyes. But I persevered and got the darned things sewn on.

The dress isn’t yet hemmed. The first year my son brought his now-wife to join our Thanksgiving celebration, she and my daughter and I sat on the floor and hemmed our Victorian dresses in preparation for our very first Dickens Fair. It was a lovely bonding time. This year I’ll be the only one hemming on Friday, but I know I’ll have good company as I sew.

The dress will be worn with a  lace collar and white sleeves. I hope to get some good photos at the fair and I’ll share them in my December post.

Until then, please have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

Ten Facts You May Not Know About Me…Jeannie Watt

Filly Fun 2016 Design to use

Hi Everyone! I’m back again to share with you ten things about me. Writing ten things sounds easy until you start…then it gets hard. But here goes…

1. I love to sew. Just love it. My mother taught me to sew when I was nine during

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my first year of 4-H. Being a kid with a short attention span, I hated sewing! A hem took an eternity, and I had better things to do! But all of my friends were in 4-H sewing, so I continued on. By the time I hit high school, I realized that I could make clothing that I couldn’t afford (this was pre-discount store time) and sewing became a passion. It was also easier after I’d attained some skills and my attention span was (slightly) longer.

 

bunny-parade

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2.I also love ponies. I learned to ride on a pony, but wanted a big horse. My younger brother had a big old gentle work horse that I coveted. However, after I finally got a big horse, I discovered that not only did I love ponies, but they loved me. I’m a pony person. I had a herd of thirteen when my husband finally put his foot down and said I had to pare down the herd. So now I have three. They’re pets.

our-house

My house in Nevada.

3.I live off the grid in rural Nevada and have for the past twenty-two years. When we first moved to our house, which is good sized and has all the amenities of any home anywhere, we would turn the power off at night and read by kerosene lantern. Now we read on our cell phones and tablets. How times h
ave changed. It was a great way to raise kids.

 

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4. That said, I’m about to move onto my parents’ farm and cattle ranch in Montana. It’s a very small cattle operation, but enough to keep us busy. We’ll be raising heritage beef, which has a lean-tender gene. Low marbling, yet lots of flavor. My dad has quite a breeding program going on.

30s-ensemble5. In addition to loving to sew, I collect vintage patterns on ebay, then sew them into clothes that I may or may not be able to wear. Sometimes they look a lot different on the pattern than they do on a real body. I’ve discovered that I have 1930s shape. Those patterns fit me well.

6. I worked in an underground mine when I was in my twenties, back when there weren’t many women underground. I worked for a year, then returned to college to get a degree in geology. I also got a degree in education.

img_15287. I started running when I was in my forties because my kids were in cross country. I hated it, but like sewing, eventually came to embrace it. I’m slow and steady.

8. I taught junior high science for 29 years. I miss my kids, but I love being retired!

9. I hate heights—my husband and I once re-roofed a garage working on our bellies for the most part, because he’s afraid of heights, too—but I don’t mind spiders.

img_303310. My family and Iimg_3012 attend the Great Dickens Fair in San Francisco every year. I made all the clothing for the family. I found that I really enjoy tailoring. I think we look very dapper.
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And there you go–ten things about me. I’m a sewing, pony-loving, off-the-grid, ranching, mining, running, height-fearing, spider-tolerating, Victorian costumer!

 

 

 

 

Petticoats & Pistols © 2015