Welcome Guest – Hebby Roman!!!

 

Charro Horses

First, I would like to thank Petticoats and Pistols, for being kind enough to host our bestselling contemporary western romance boxed set, A Cowboy to Keep.

My latest release, Border Romance is one of seven stories in the set, and it’s the third book of my On the Border Series. These books take place on the Texas-Mexican border and feature a ranch that trains horses for the Mexican specialty of charro riding, as well as rodeo events such as barrel racing and calf roping, and cutting horses, too. Since charro riding is not widely understood in the United States, I wanted to explain how these specialty horses perform.

Charro riding is an event in a charreada or charrería, which is a competitive event similar to our rodeos and was developed from animal husbandry practices used on the haciendas of old México. The sport has been described as “living history,” or as an art form drawn from the demands of working life. Evolving from the traditions brought from Spain in the 16th century, the first charreadas were ranch work competitions between haciendas. The modern Charreada developed after the Mexican Revolution when charro traditions were disappearing. The charreada consists of nine events for men plus one for women, all of which involve horses, cattle or both.

The participants in the charreada wear traditional charro clothing, including a closely fitted suit, chaps, boots, and a wide brim sombrero. The body-fitting suit of the charro, while decorative, is also practical; it fits closely to insure there is no flapping cloth to be caught by the horns of steers. The botinas, or little boots, prevent feet from slipping through the stirrups. Spurs are worn on the botinas.

The saddle of the charro has a wider horn than that of that of a western saddle, which helps safeguard the charro from being pitched off and from being hung up. There are two grips at the back of the saddle, in case the charro needs to have a handhold during certain trick maneuvers.

In a charreada, the most common competition is called cala de caballo or reining. Literally the demonstration of the horse rein, as the horse is required to show its talents in the canter, gallop, slide stop, spins on its hind legs as well as backing. It is one of the hardest events to master and also the most elaborately scored. The running slide, left and right spinning, rear leg pivoting, and backing abilities are tested. The charro rider and horse are evaluated carefully. Horses are judged for vigor, manageability, docility, gait and obedience. Carriage of head and tail are all critically evaluated and scored accordingly.

Charro horses also perform tricks, very similar to those of the famous Lippazzaner stallions in Austria. Trick riding such as rearing on signal, backing up on the horse’s two back feet, and spinning, have given these horses the moniker of “dancing horses.” In addition, they can be trained to prance in time to music, making them appear to dance with the strains of popular Mexican ballads.

They often are the lead feature in Texas-México border parades and rodeos. Charro horses are also used to showcase a charro rider’s elaborate rope tricks while calmly cantering around an

arena. And of course, if you’re a horse lover, all charro horses are selected for their beautiful conformation and flowing manes and tails.

For you western lovers, I hope you have enjoyed this explanation of a fascinating sport, featuring beautiful and very talented horses. And I hope you will read more about charro horses in my story, “Border Romance.” You can find more about my books at my website  or my Facebook page.  For beautiful pictures of charro horses, visit my “A Cowboy To Keep” Board on Pinterest.

 

Catch a cowboy … Keep a cowboy …

Don’t miss this great collection from USA Today, Amazon Bestselling, and Award-Winning authors!! Available here.

THE LEGEND OF BAD MOON RISING by Carra Copelin

Sheriff Ben Hammond is finally over the woman who shattered his heart, but when Dinah Horne suddenly returns, can he ignore the passion still burning bright between them?

CITY BOY, COUNTRY HEART by Andrea Downing

Trading horses for subways for two years seemed like a good idea to cowboy Chay Ridgway, but can city girl K.C. Daniels keep a rein on his country heart?

BLUE SAGE by Kristy McCaffrey

Archaeologist Audrey Driggs rolls off a mountain and lands at the feet of rugged cowboy Braden Delaney. Together, they’ll uncover a long-lost secret.

THE DRIFTER’S KISS by Devon McKay

Determined to take back what belongs to her, Addison Reed will do anything. Even trust a complete stranger.

HER MAN by Hildie McQueen

Deputy Mark Hunter falls for Eliza Brock during a murder investigation. Is it fate or bad luck, especially when she may be involved?

BORDER ROMANCE by Hebby Roman

Widow Leticia Villarreal wants to establish a horse-racing stable and old acquaintance John Clay Laidlaw offers to help. But can she trust him with her business and her heart?

PHOENIX HEAT by Patti Sherry-Crews

After losing her fiancé and her New York City business, Harper Donovan returns to Arizona and meets cowboy Frank Flynn. Will his past and their differences extinguish the heat between them?

Thanks, western readers for stopping by and chatting with me today on Petticoats and Pistols. Charro horses are mostly an unknown quantity for most rodeo goers, unless you’re in the Southwestern part of the United States, close to the Mexican border. These are beautiful and very talented horses that I wanted to highlight for readers.

If you leave a comment, you will be included in the drawing for my Giveaway today: a $25 Amazon Gift Card. So, please, fire away with those comments or questions!

 

Guest Blogger

Molly Noble Bull Coming Friday

Ms Molly Noble Bull is coming around the bend. She’ll arrive Friday, July 14, 2017!

This dear lady has led quite a life and will talk about growing up on a big ranch in South Texas. You’ll find it very interesting.

Come and join us on the porch. Prop your feet up and stay a while.

Ms Molly is also toting books to give away!

So mark your calendar and head over.

 

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: July 12, 2017 — 8:23 am

The Pinkertons

I love TV westerns. From the good old days with Bonanza to more recent times with Longmire, I truly enjoy getting lost in a good western tale of cowboy heroes with grit and honor. Several months ago I discovered a new offering on Netflix that immediately piqued my interest. I love a good crime drama as much as I love my westerns, and here was a show that combined them both – The Pinkertons.

This beauty of a show was actually made in Canada even though it follows the cases of Pinkerton Detectives in Kansas City, Missouri following the end of the Civil War. My favorite thing about this show is that it is officially licensed with the Pinkerton Detective Agency, and its episodes as based on actual cases taken from the Pinkerton Detective Agency archives from the 1860s.

While Allan Pinkerton, founder of the agency does occasionally make an appearance on the show, the two main characters are Will Pinkerton (Allan’s son and Pinkerton agent) and Kate Warne (a Pinkerton and the first female detective in US history).

Kate Warne was a widow by the age of 23 and joined the Pinkerton Agency in 1856.

Pinkerton, in his book, The Spy of the Rebellion: Being a True History of the Spy System of the United States Army During the Late Rebellion… described her as:

[a] commanding person, with clear cut, expressive features…a slender, brown-haired woman, graceful in her movements and self-possessed. Her features, although not what could be called handsome [beautiful], were decidedly of an intellectual cast… her face was honest, which would cause one in distress instinctly [sic] to select her as a confidante.

Warne walked into the Pinkerton Detective Agency in response to an advertisement in a local newspaper. When she walked into Pinkerton’s Chicago office, according to Pinkerton company records, he further described her acquaintance:

“[he] was surprised to learn Kate was not looking for clerical work, but was actually answering an advertisement for detectives he had placed in a Chicago newspaper. At the time, such a concept was almost unheard of. Pinkerton said ” It is not the custom to employ women detectives!” Kate argued her point of view eloquently – pointing out that women could be “most useful in worming out secrets in many places which would be impossible for a male detective.” A Woman would be able to befriend the wives and girlfriends of suspected criminals and gain their confidence. Men become braggarts when they are around women who encourage them to boast. Kate also noted, Women have an eye for detail and are excellent observers.”

Warne’s arguments swayed Pinkerton, who employed Warne as the first female detective. Pinkerton soon had a chance to put Warne to the test. (source)

There is only one season available of this show, but it contains 22 episodes. I’m about halfway through them right now and savoring each one.

Click cover to order.

 

As it turns out, I have Pinkerton detectives in my most recent book, Heart on the Line. And in my story, the Pinkertons themselves are the mystery. Fraudulent identities and corrupt agents make it unclear who can be trusted. Yet in the end, I think Allan Pinkerton would be pleased with how things turned out.

 

Do you like stories about Pinkertons?

What historically set shows do you enjoy watching?

(I’m always on the lookout for something new to add to my queue.)

Karen Witemeyer
Winner of the ACFW Carol Award, the HOLT Medallion, and two-time RITA finalist, CBA bestselling author, Karen Witemeyer, writes historical romance for Bethany House believing the world needs more happily ever afters ... and hunky cowboy heroes. She's an avid cross-stitcher, shower singer, and bakes a mean apple cobbler. She makes her home in Abilene, TX with her husband and three children.

WAR CLOUD’S PASSION/Goldie Locks & the Three Bears

Howdy!

And welcome to another beautiful Tuesday.  I say beautiful because where I am, we have  powder blue sky and some fluffy clouds — a gorgeous day.  Oh, by the way, the give-away book today is the mass market version (print copy) of WAR CLOUD’S PASSION.

Okay, okay.  You might be wondering what a serious book (and this book encompasses a rather serious topic) — and Goldie Locks & the Three Bears might have in common?  Well, I’ll attempt to answer that in this blog.

Don’t know if I’ve ever told this story in detail — it’s kinda the “story behind the story,” but…only kinda.  Off to the right here is the Kindle version of War Cloud’s Passion.  It is the newest book up on KindleUnlimited if you are a member of KU.

It’s not often that I read my own books.  I don’t like to, mostly because I’m so critical of my own work.  But because my husband and I had just uploaded this book to KindleUnlimited, I read a page or two and found…a typo.  Probably it was a typo from the conversion of the mass market version of the book to Kindle.  But because of that typo, I decided to read the book through again — just in case.

War Cloud’s Passion is a story about War Cloud, an “outlaw” Cheyenne War Chief, who after attacking a train in order to free his younger brother, finds himself saddled with several orphans and Anna, the heroine of the story.

In writing this book, my brother-in-law had an idea.  Now, my brother-in-law, Bob, was quite a character, and he loved to laugh.  So one night as I sat around the living room talking about the story line of the newest book I was writing, he had a suggestion:  Why not insert a line or two about Goldie Locks and the Three Bears?  He thought the idea would be hilarious — given the more serious topic of the book.  I mean after all, the heroine’s hair color was a kind of golden blond.

Well, I thought about it and thought about it, and because he’d made me laugh and see the humor in it, I found a place in the book where I could make mention of Goldie Locks and the Three Bears.

My editor didn’t quite like the mention of three bears, but I convinced her to keep the line in, anyway (not telling her why).  For a while I ran contests to see if anyone could find the reference, and a few people did.  But then, life went on and I sort of forgot about it.

But as I was reading this book the other night, there it was — subtle, but there it was.

It made my husband and I smile, because Bob was a very dear part of our family.  It was an uplifting moment.  Here’s a link to some pictures of Bob and my husband, Paul and me.  http://novels-by-karenkay.com/toursphotos/2008-tour-pictures-dedicated-to-robert-bailey/2008-tour-pictures-dedicated-to-robert-bailey-part-iii/

And so I’m giving away a free copy of the mass market edition of WAR CLOUD’S PASSION.  A word to the winner:  the sentence (and it’s only one sentence, I believe) is toward the end of the book — not the very end, but about 3/4’s-7/8’s of the way through.  Look for it there.  I’ll leave you with some more pictures of Bob, my mother-in-law, Paul and me.

Karen Kay
KAREN KAY aka GEN BAILEY is the author of 17 American Indian Historical Romances. She has written for such prestigious publishers as AVON/HarperCollins, Berkley/Penguin/Putnam and Samhain Publishing. KAREN KAY’S great grandmother was Choctaw Indian and Kay is honored to be able to write about the American Indian Culture.
Please refer to http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules for all contest rules.
Updated: July 11, 2017 — 1:16 pm

Ransom Canyon Giveaway #5

 

Big congratulations to:

.

Janine

.

Janine – You’re the winner of Book 5

Wild Horse Springs.

.

I just know you’re gonna love Miss Jodi’s story.

.

The rest o’ you ought not give up hope. Miss Jodi will be at the Junction next Sunday as well, giving away another copy of one of her Ransom Canyon books. Head on back, leave a comment, and your name just might be the next one drawn from my lucky Stetson. Yehaw!

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.

Hebby Roman Visits on Thursday!

Miss Hebby Roman will arrive in the Junction on Thursday, July 13, 2017!

Have you ever heard of charro riding? Well, it’s a new one for me too. I reckon we’ll find out together.

Miss Hebby has a new book that’s in a boxed set out and wants to celebrate.

Come over and help her.

She has a nice gift card to give away.

 

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: July 10, 2017 — 5:40 pm

My Southwestern Vacation

Hello everyone, Winnie Griggs here.

I’ve just recently returned from a week long family vacation to Arizona where we had an absolute blast.  There were twelve members in our group, though we didn’t all travel together. Me, my husband and two of our kids flew together into Flagstaff.  My oldest daughter and her husband flew into with plans to drive to the Grand Canyon from there.  And my youngest daughter and her extended family (a group of 6) decided to drive and make several stops along the way.  All through the week our groups came together in a very fluid way, different combinations breaking off on different days to do things of particular interest to them. But by mid-week we were all together at Bright Angel Lodge on the southern rim of the Grand Canyon.  For about half the group it was their first time to view this awesome wonder in person and they were blown away by the views.  For the rest of us, revisiting the place had almost as big an impact as seeing it for the first time.

Anyway, I thought I’d give you all a little taste of what we experienced by sharing just some of the many pictures we took.

Flagstaff was our home base for this trip. Our first full day there, we took the scenic drive from Flagstaff to Sedona, stopping at several points along the way to admire the scenery and take pictures.

When we returned to Flagstaff we decided to take a trip out to the nearby Lowell Observatory. We were lucky in that there was a cloudless sky and we were able to get clear views of the sun, moon, Saturn and  Jupiter through the many telescopes they had set out.  Seeing the actual rings of Saturn as well as the pencil dot moons was VERY cool.

The next day we all headed out to the Grand Canyon Notional Park.  Six of us decided to take the two hour train ride out of nearby Williams to get there. Williams is a fun place right on Route 66. They are set up to entertain tourists and there are fun little Wild West shows at the train station you can watch while waiting on departure time.  The train ride itself was fun (it was my first time on a train) and as you can see from the photo below it was quite comfy 🙂

We spent two days at the park itself, staying in cabins at the wonderful Bright Angel Lodge which is located right on the south rim itself.

Our first day there we  just enjoyed the area around the lodge and got the lay of the land. Our second day, we all headed in different directions.  Four of our group decided to hike down into the canyon along the Bright Angel Trail (it goes without saying I wasn’t one of their number!).

The rest of us went on various exploration trips. Hubby and I saw both the Desert View Watchtower and Hermit’s Rest, two structures designed in the early twentieth century by Mary Colter, one of the few females architects of her time.

We also stopped at a lot of the viewing sights along the way. At one particular spot hubby spotted a rock formation that resembled a human profile. I took a photo of it – can you make it out? We also spotted several elk along the roadside and folks in our group managed to get photos of two of them.

After two days at the Grand Canyon, we headed out, again splitting into two groups, those that were driving the whole way started home, the rest of us headed back to Flagstaff. Along the way, though, we visited a wildlife park called Bearizona.  There were lots of different kinds of animals there – mountain goats, buffalo, wolves and more – but my favorites were the bears. And we got photos of two especially enterprising ones that found a way to cool off.

Our last day out we revisited Sedona for a jeep tour of the area.  It was a teeth-rattling bumpy ride but so worth it for the views.  Here is a picture our driver took of the four of us.

When we returned to Flagstaff we decided to cap off our vacation with a trip to the Snowbowl. It’s a ski lift that operates in the off season to take tourists up to the top of the peak. It’s a thirty minute ride that carries you up to an ear-popping elevation of 11,500 feet.

And then it was time to head home.

As I said it was a wonderful vacation, one that will make me smile whenever I remember it.

What about you? Have you ever visited this part of our country? And do you have a favorite vacation you look back on fondly?

 

 

 

Winnie Griggs
Winnie Griggs is the author of Historical (and occasionally Contemporary) romances that focus on Small Towns, Big Hearts, Amazing Grace. She is also a list maker, a lover of dragonflies and holds an advanced degree in the art of procrastination.
Three of Winnie’s books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, and one of those nominations resulted in a win.
Winnie loves to hear from readers. You can connect with her on facebook at www.facebook.com/WinnieGriggs.Author or email her at winnie@winniegriggs.com.

Jodi Thomas Ransom Canyon Giveaway #5

Jodi’s back for another Ransom Canyon Giveaway. YeeHaw!!!

Wild Horse Springs

I wanted to write a story about happens when a fantasy comes true when I started Wild Horse Springs. I loved writing my sheriff, Dan Brigman. He daydreams of meeting a wild and beautiful woman, so when he finds a fancy blue woman’s cowboy boot, he tries to picture what the woman who wore it would be like. Finding her becomes his quest.

Step into Wild Horse Spring with me and fall in love for the first time all over again.

  • Are you a daydreamer?
  • Ever mentally rewritten the end of a movie or book to make it more satisfying?
  • Was there a time when your dreams were surpassed by reality?

To enter for a chance to win a copy of the fifth book in the Ransom Canyon series, leave a comment below. Winner will be selected on Monday, July 10.

Guest Blogger

Mary Alford Has Winners!!

Thanks for coming, Miss Mary! We enjoyed your visit. I dearly love Colorado.

And we sure do appreciate the giveaway!

So without further ado…the winners are…………

DALE STEWART

SUSAN JOHNSON

Woo-Hoo! I’m dancing a jig for you ladies. This book looks so exciting. Miss Mary will contact you so keep a lookout for her email.

 

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: July 9, 2017 — 10:41 am

GRACE AND THE RANCHER by MARY ALFORD

Hi everyone, my name is Mary Alford and I’m thrilled to be with you today. Along with Romantic Suspense, I write sweet Contemporary Westerns set in the mountains of Colorado and Montana.

I fell in love with the mountains the first time I visited them many years ago. Before that time, I was a beach girl at heart until my husband and I made a trip to the historic town of Silverton, Colorado and that was it. I loved everything about the mountains and Silverton, including its history.

Silverton is a historic silver and gold mining town nestled in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. The Animas River that runs around the town is where the old time miners first discovered traces of gold and silver in 1860. In 1874 the town of Silverton was laid out and it soon became the center of numerous mining camps.

Yet, through the years, the mining slowly dried up, but Silverton still remains a popular tourist attraction, being linked to Durango, Colorado by the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, a National Historic Landmark. And believe it or not, there’s still gold and silver to be found there if you are so inclined to look.

When I set out to write, Grace And The Rancher, my White Rose Publishing release set in the fictional mountain town of Delaney Mountain, it was with Silverton in mind as an example for Delaney Mountain. Although Delaney Mountain is better known for its rich ranch land instead of mining, living in the mountains and forging out a living there as a rancher, has a whole new set of problems.

As hard as the winters in Colorado can be today, with the snowfall piling up, and the isolation that comes with living in the mountains, still, I can’t imagine how difficult ranching in the mountains of Colorado must have been in the old days.

Travel was difficult, the roads crude, supplies were not easily accessible, and the winters brutal on the cattle as well as those who worked them. Just moving cattle from one piece of property to another in search of better grazing consumed time.

While my hero, Kyle Delaney, might not have had to face the difficulties those early cattle ranchers did, he still has his own set of challenges. Kyle is coming back to Delaney Mountain after his father’s death to try and resurrect Delaney Ranch from its ashes. And in the process, he finds something he never expected to find again. Love.

About Grace And The Rancher:

Grace Bradford is living a lie. To the world she has the perfect life: A promising country music career and a husband who adores her. But her husband isn’t the man everyone believes him to be. When a car accident widows her and ends her career, Grace escapes to Delaney Mountain. But moving to the remote town doesn’t wipe away the ugly secret of her marriage. Kyle Delaney never intended to return to Delaney Mountain, but he promises his dying father that he’ll turn their land into a working cattle ranch. He uproots his life in Austin, sells his flourishing business as a music agent, and returns to the Colorado town of his childhood. Can a runaway singer and a makeshift rancher, thrust together by circumstance and held together by the common thread of loss and a love of music, find hope and a happily-ever-after under the stars of Delaney Mountain?

Amazon Link

 

I will be giving away two ebook copies of Grace And The Rancher to commenters today.

A little about Mary:

I was inspired to become a writer after reading romantic suspense greats Victoria Holt and Phyllis Whitney. Soon creating characters and throwing them into dramatic situations that test their faith came naturally for me. In 2012, I entered the Speed Dating contest hosted by Love Inspired and later received “the call”. Writing is truly a dream come true for me.

Thanks so much for allowing me to stop by and talk to you today.

All the best…Mary Alford

 

Guest Blogger
Petticoats & Pistols © 2015