Pam Hillman Has a Winner!

Pam Hillman The PromiseThank you, Miz Pam, for coming to help us celebrate this historic week!

Your generosity astounds and delights.

And now for the winner of the three signed books…….

TARA JOHNSON

Woo-Hoo! Congratulations, Tara. Miss Pam will contact you so be watching for it.

 

 

Felicia Filly
When I'm not keepin' all these Fillies in line, I'm practicing my roping so I can catch me a cowboy. Me and Jasper (my mule) are two peas in a pod. Both of us are as crotchety as all get-out.
Updated: August 12, 2017 — 9:17 pm

Think Like a Horse: 10 Favorite Cowboy Sayings

 

Kathryn Albright Kathryn Albright &Margaret Brownley

Margaret Brownley

wish Petticoats and Pistols

a Rip-Roarin’,

Yippee Ki-Yay

Son-of-a-Gun Birthday

Celebration

To help celebrate, we decided to share some of our favorite words

to live by–cowboy style!

So pull up a log to sit on, prop yer feet by the fire,

and consider the wisdom of the West ~

Kathryn’s Favorites:
(It’s so hard to choose only five! There are so many good ones.)

 

1.  Before you go into a canyon, know how you’ll get out.     
2.  Never straddle a fence. Build one, or tear it down.
3.  You can’t tell how good a man or a watermelon is till you thump’em.
4.  If you want to stay single, look for the perfect woman.
5.  A mail-order marriage is trickier’n braidin’ a mule’s tail.

Margaret’s Favorites:

1.  You don’t have to attend every argument to which you are invited.
2.  Too little temptation can lead to virtue.
3.  If you come home with a hair on your vest, you better have a horse to match.
4.  Love your enemies, but keep your gun oiled.
5.  Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear or a fool from any direction.

Now it’s your turn.  What are your favorite words to live by?

Leave a comment to be entered into a drawing for a $10 Amazon gift card

(in celebration of our 10 years here!)

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P.S. Don’t forget to enter the giant birthday bash giveaway. You can find all the details along with the entry form HERE.

Celebration

Running from trouble, Maggie McCary signs up to be a mail-order bride.

She doesn’t intend to actually marry…but one sensational kiss changes her mind!

Mail-Order Brides of Oak GroveAmazon

B&N

iTunes

There’s a new sheriff in town and she almost always catches her man!

A Match Made in Texas

Amazon

B&N

iTunes

 

 

Margaret Brownley
Margaret has published more than 40 books and is a N.Y. Times Bestselling author and past Romance Writers of America Rita Finalist. She writes historical novels set--where else?--in the Old West! A Match Made in Texas is available for pre-order now. Margaret's stories also appear in the 12 Brides of Christmas, Pioneer Christmas and Second Chance at Star Inn collections. Not bad for someone who flunked 8th grade English. Just don't ask her to diagram a sentence.

10 Snags of Writing Colonials vs. Westerns by Guest Author Pam Hillman

 

Please welcome guest author Pam Hillman! It’s always a pleasure to have her here at Wildflower Junction! Today she has a great giveaway planned and, with a nod to our 10-year celebration, has had the daunting task of coming up with 10 differences she’s had to deal with as an author between westerns and colonials. 

Pam Hillman Author

Happy 10th Anniversary Petticoats and Pistols!

Thank you for allowing me to be part of this celebration.

I proposed a 1790s colonial series set in the Natchez Mississippi District and, to my delight, my publisher bought it. Sure, I knew there would be a bit of a change in my writing style from westerns to the 18th century. But it’s only about 80 years difference. How hard could it be? How much could change in 80 years? Well…

Anachronistic Words

 On the off-chance that I’m not the only one who had to look up the meaning of anachronistic, it means “something or someone that is not in its correct historical or chronological time.”
Okay. Got it.
With a few exceptions of course, if I had been switching from writing colonials to westerns, my toolbox full of words would have carried over as they were already in use 70-80 years earlier. But since I was going backwards in time, I had a lot of favorite words that had to be cut because they weren’t in use in the 1790s. Words like smidgen (1845), howdy (1840), smokestack (1860), boilerplate (1860). The list goes on and on.

Patterns of Speech

A man of the colonial period had a different pattern of speech than the 1880s cowboy did. Their language was a bit more formal, more stilted, but it’s a little more subtle than that. It’s the cowboy lingo, the drawl, that sets the two periods apart. The words they used were important though, because that’s the only way we can really show that slow, sexy drawl of a cowboy. I’ll be honest, I missed that aspect of writing my cowboys.
Sigh.
But I still managed to make Connor O’Shea a swoon-worthy colonial-type cowboy, I think. 🙂
Pam Hillman

Good Day, Mistress Bartholomew

While Mister (Mr.), Missis/Missus (Mrs.), and Miss could be used in the 18th century, Mistress and Master are words we tend to associate for those in authority or as terms of respect during the colonial period. So, I used all of the above in my 1790s series, simply to provide variety. A little about ma’am, specifically. It’s associated closely with the cowboy vernacular as a term of respect to women, but it was in use by 1670. I used ma’am, but a lot less liberally than I would in a western, sprinkling in the more proper Mistress to help set the tone apart from a western.

Housekeeping and Tools

It’s the little things that jump out and bite you. Wood-burning cast iron stoves were invented in the mid-1500s, but it wasn’t until the industrial revolution that they were even remotely affordable for the general public. So I had to be careful not to use the word “stove” in my 1790s stories in that context. After writing several westerns where my heroines cook on a wood burning stove, pulled bread out of the oven, or the hero reached for the coffee pot in the cookhouse, that turned out to be quite a challenge. Unfortunately, I’m afraid one or two references might have slipped through.
Mostly pots and pans, tools, and things of that sort didn’t change much between the two periods. But when in doubt, I always check sources.
Pam Hillman Promise Kept

Let’s Eat

 Cobbler (1860) and sowbelly (1870) were two of a slew (1840 btw) of words I couldn’t have used in my 1790s series, but when I looked at a list of foods from 1790s, the only one that I would hesitate to use in the late 1800s was matelote (1730), which is a type of stew.

Let There be Light

I also had to be careful of the type lighting my characters used. In my westerns, the hero might just light the lantern, and readers immediately know what type of lantern I meant. While the word lantern goes back to 1300, during 18th century America, they mostly used candles with tin reflectors to reflect the light. Widespread use of kerosene lamps and lanterns came at a bit of a later time.

Catch Phrases

Probably the biggest hurdle for me was the catch phrases peppered throughout westerns. Phrases like “poker face” (1885, but my editor found evidence that the first poker game was played in 1829), “pipe dream” (1900), and the one that gave me the most sorrow to cut was “hook, line, and sinker” (1838).

Social Mores

The class structure of the haves and the have nots was still in place in the late 18th century in the Americas, but it was slipping. As hordes of immigrants, both bond and free, flooded into the colonies in the 18th and 19th centuries, they held the promise of freedom close. The cowboy, the gold miner, the railroad worker, the pioneers all had freedom of choice that their ancestors only dreamed of.
So, there was a bit of a shift in the way I portrayed my characters to the way I’d show a foot-loose and fancy-free cowboy.

The Cowboy Swagger and His Clothes

There’s just something about describing a cowboy, the way he talks, the way he walks, his clothes, his boots. Maybe it’s just ingrained in me after reading and writing westerns my whole life. They say clothes don’t make the man, but a Stetson and a pair of cowboy boots goes a long way. But, still it is possible to give that swagger to a man who’s been plunked down in a different time period.
Pam Hillman 3

The Word Cowboy

For the record, the word cowboy was in use by 1725, a noun to refer to a cow herder or a“young cowhand”. I just can’t really see Mel Gibson or Captain Jack uttering the word cowboy in The Patriot or any of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, but stranger things than that have happened.
Now that I know the word was in existence, I’ll try to slip it in my next 1790s historical. 🙂
 
Pam Hillman The Promise

The Promise of Breeze Hill

 Natchez, MS; 1791
Anxious for his brothers to join him on the rugged frontier along the Mississippi River, Connor O’Shea has no choice but to indenture himself as a carpenter in exchange for their passage from Ireland. But when he’s sold to Isabella Bartholomew of Breeze Hill Plantation, Connor fears he’ll repeat past mistakes and vows not to be tempted by the lovely lady. The responsibilities of running Breeze Hill have fallen on Isabella’s shoulders after her brother was found dead in the swamps along the Natchez Trace and a suspicious fire devastated their crops, almost destroyed their home, and left her father seriously injured. Even with Connor’s help, Isabella fears she’ll lose her family’s plantation. Despite her growing feelings for the handsome Irish carpenter, she seriously considers accepting her wealthy and influential neighbor’s proposal of marriage.
Soon, though, Connor realizes someone is out to eliminate the Bartholomew family. Can he set aside his own feelings to keep Isabella safe?
Pam Hillman
It’s time for prizes, yes? It may be Petticoats & Pistols’ birthday, but you get the gifts! I’m giving away a bag of books today. Signed copies of Claiming Mariah, Stealing Jake, and The Promise of Breeze Hill.
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In addition, my publisher is sponsoring a Mississippi Gift Basket Giveaway to celebrate the release of The Promise of Breeze Hill. Click the graphic to the right to enter that separate contest.
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Leave a comment to enter the book giveaway mentioned above.
 
Pam Hillman Author 2
CBA Bestselling author PAM HILLMAN was born and raised on a dairy farm in Mississippi and spent her teenage years perched on the seat of a tractor raking hay. In those days, her daddy couldn’t afford two cab tractors with air conditioning and a radio, so Pam drove an Allis Chalmers 110. Even when her daddy asked her if she wanted to bale hay, she told him she didn’t mind raking. Raking hay doesn’t take much thought so Pam spent her time working on her tan and making up stories in her head. Now, that’s the kind of life every girl should dream of.

P.S. Don’t forget to enter the giant birthday bash giveaway (separate from this daily giveaway). You can find all the details along with the entry form HERE.

Guest Blogger

Karen & Jeannie’s Winners!

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We had so much fun walking down memory lane with all of you this week. I think we all agreed that we need more quality TV westerns these days.

Jeannie and I used our random winner generator and pulled two names out of the Petticoats & Pistols Stetson (once we wrangled it away from Felicia’s mule, Jasper). The results are in!

Congratulations

Cindy Woolard

and

Emilee Hill

Yeehaw!!! Cindy will be receiving the first season of Rawhide featuring a young, hunky Clint Eastwood and Emilee will receive the first season of The Magnificent Seven featuring seven hunky western heroes.

Enjoy your binge watching, ladies!

Karen Witemeyer
For those who love to smile as they read, bestselling author Karen Witemeyer offers warmhearted historical romance with a flair for humor, feisty heroines, and swoon-worthy Texas heroes. Karen is a firm believer in the power of happy endings. . . and ice cream. She is an avid cross-stitcher, and makes her home in Abilene, TX with her husband and three children. Learn more about Karen and her books at: www.karenwitemeyer.com.
Updated: August 10, 2017 — 9:15 am

Touring the American Old West

Dear readers

I invite you to come along as I share my travels through the American old west. I’m thrilled to be one of the new fillies here at Petticoats & Pistols and I can’t wait to share my love of the Old West with you.

About me: Along with writing contemporary western romances I also write contemporary romantic women’s fiction.  You’ll find that all of my books are set in small towns and usually include a few quirky characters. My stories incorporate the themes of home, family and redemption. This September I will publish my 40th project for Harlequin Books and my current series is called, Cowboys of Stampede, Texas. I also write small-town romances for Tule Publishing’s Montana Born line and Sweet Home Cowboy is my latest release.

 

 

 

 

 

And I’m a member of the Tall Poppy Writers. You  can find out more about my small-town romantic women’s fiction novels as well as my western books on my Website.

 

If you follow me on social media then you know I love junk. My friends call me vintage Marin because I love flea markets so much. If you haven’t heard of Junk in the Trunk you should check it out!

I don’t know why, but I’ve always been comfortable around old stuff. I find ideas for my stories and characters when I browse through people’s castoffs. My love of antiques goes right along with my love of history and the old west. One of my hobbies is researching ghost tours and haunted old west towns. Sadly I’ve never experienced an encounter with a ghost but I love taking tours that share the history of the haunted locations.  Hubby and I currently live in Phoenix and we’re recent empty nesters so we’re using our newfound freedom to travel the beautiful Grande Canyon State.

This past July my husband and I ventured out on Route 66 in northern Arizona. You can find all of my travel photos on my Instagram page.

 

Winslow, Arizona

Route 66 Standing on a corner in Winslow, Arizona has been on my bucket list for years.

For those of you who are confused this video Take it Easy by the Eagles band will explain it and reveal my age, lol!

Drift Inn Saloon

After Winslow we got off Route 66 and stopped at the copper mining town of Globe, Arizona and had lunch at the haunted Drift Inn Saloon—one of oldest continuously operating saloons in the state, opening its doors in 1902. The Drift Inn Saloon has been named one of the top five biker-destination bars in the state by the Arizona Republic newspaper and one of the “Magnificent 7” saloons by Arizona Highways Magazine. The second floor was originally opened as a boarding house for miners then turned into a brothel a few years later.

  

The bar is a living icon of the Old West, with its original tin ceiling. A Frank Olsen mural of Monument Valley is painted along one wall and hanging above the image are vintage portraits of soiled doves, which pay homage to the ladies who once worked in the brothel above the bar.

When I learned the bartender Eileen, was one of the owners of the bar, I bombarded her with questions about the history of the building. She and her partner had lived on the second floor for several years while they renovated the bar. She claimed the building was haunted and then asked if I’d like to go upstairs and look around. Of course I said YES!

Eileen told stories about the building that the local old-timers had shared with her after she bought the place. Several mediums have walked through the building and confirmed that spirits inhabit the premises. One of the rooms is said to be full of trapped souls unable to escape. And room 18 is said to be a very dark, evil room. A young woman stands in the shower and watches people in the bathroom. And of course there’s the nasty spirit of a man who wanders the upstairs. The medium couldn’t tell the owners for sure who he was but they believe he may be either Joseph Ludwig, a local miner who was murdered in one of the upstairs rooms in 1906 or the man who murdered him.

 

As a writer we romanticize cowboys and the old west in our stories… because who wants to read about smelly, bowlegged men who bathe once a month and are missing half their teeth? But that afternoon in Globe as I walked past the twenty-five rooms on the second floor of the Drift Inn Saloon, I had to acknowledge that life in the old west could be cruel, harsh and deadly.

I hope you enjoyed hearing about my experience at the Drift Inn Saloon. I can’t wait to share with you the other Route66 places and towns in Arizona. And since this is my first blog as an official P&P filly, let’s do a giveaway!

 *Giveaway*

 

Tell me if you’ve ever had a paranormal experience or taken a ghost tour and your name will be entered into a drawing to receive a digital copy of my sweet western novella, The Bull Rider’s Pledge. I’ll reveal the winner’s name in the comment section of this blog post on Saturday August 12th.

Until next time…Happy Trails!

 

SaveSave

P.S. Don’t forget to enter the giant birthday bash giveaway (separate from this daily giveaway). You can find all the details along with the entry form HERE.

SaveSave

Marin Thomas
I may have grown up in the Midwest but my favorite place in the whole world is Arizona. Hubby and I are recent empty nesters living in Phoenix and we like to take off and explore the Grande Canyon State every chance we get. I’ve been writing contemporary western romances since 2004 for Harlequin and have recently begun writing western stories for Tule Publishing Group. I also write romantic women's fiction for Berkley Books and am a proud member of Tall Poppy Writers https://tallpoppies.org. When I’m not writing or traveling I spend my free time junk hunting and researching ghost tours. I invite you to sign up for my newsletter at http://bit.ly/MarinThomasUpdates and drop by my website at www.marinthomas.com to learn more about my books and find out where you can connect with me on social media.

Linda & Winnie’s Winners!!!

Hello everyone!  Thanks so much for turning out to help us celebrate the Fillies 10th anniversary. And it was so much fun to read about your own favorite Western Songs and Ballads – several of them are still playing in my head !! 🙂

We threw everyone’s name in a hat and here are the winners we selected:

The winner of an autographed copy of Linda’s Knight on the Texas Plains along with the a pair of cowboy boot earrings is

Karen Markuson

Congratulations, Karen. Please contact Linda at  broday.linda932@gmail.com to work out the logistics.

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And the winner of an autographed copy of Winnie’s A Tailor-Made Husband (or any other book from her backlist) and a Hunting Cowboys necklace is

Stephanie Jenkins Ortiz Cerrillo

Congratulations to you too, Stephanie. Please contact Winnie via her website to confirm your book choice and to provide your mailing info.

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Good luck wishes going out to everyone in the big anniversary giveaway that will be awarded at the end of the week!

 

Winnie Griggs
Winnie Griggs is the author of Historical (and occasionally Contemporary) romances that focus on Small Towns, Big Hearts, Amazing Grace. She is also a list maker, a lover of dragonflies and holds an advanced degree in the art of procrastination.
Three of Winnie’s books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, and one of those nominations resulted in a win.
Winnie loves to hear from readers. You can connect with her on facebook at www.facebook.com/WinnieGriggs.Author or email her at winnie@winniegriggs.com.
Updated: August 10, 2017 — 1:47 am

Julie Benson has a winner!

Sorry I’m so late getting this done, but I’m still learning the ropes around here. Next time I’ll be sure to announce my winner the day after my post.
Thanks to everyone who stopped by to chat and made me feel so welcome during my first day as a filly!
And the winner is…

Ellie

Please contact me at Julie@juliebenson.net to discuss details.

 

Julie Benson
Julie Benson has written five novels for Harlequin American, and her Wishing, Texas series is available from Tule Publishing. Now that her three sons have left the nest in Dallas, when she isn't writing, Julie spends her time working on home improvement projects, rescuing dogs, and visiting Texas wineries with her husband. Visit her at www.juliebenson.net.
Updated: August 9, 2017 — 10:45 am

We Have Some Winners for Karen Kay and Phyliss Miranda’s Give-Away

Howdy!  We have a great time yesterday at the blog.  What a treat to see you all there and to listen to what y’all had to say.  And indeed we do have winners for the prizes we offered.

Phyliss’s winner for the book, GIVE ME A TEXAS RANGER and the gift certificate for Bath and Body Works is:     Connie Saunders.

Congratulations to Connie.  I know you’ll enjoy the gift.

Karen Kay’s winners are first for the Mass Market copy of SOARING EAGLE’S EMBRACE:  Deana Dick

Karen Kay’s other winner for the Tradepaper copy of the book SENECA SURRENDER, is

Carol Luciano

Congratulations to Connie and Deana and Carol.

Deana Dick and Carol Luciano, please email me privately at karenkay(dot)author(at)earthlink(dot)net  so we can arrange getting the book to you.  I’ll need a physical address to send the book

Connie, bear with me for just a moment.  I have to get Phyliss’s email address so that the two of you can arrange to get the prize to you.

Many thanks to all for coming to the blog yesterday and for your kind, kind comments.  We send you all much love.

Karen Kay
KAREN KAY aka GEN BAILEY is the author of 17 American Indian Historical Romances. She has written for such prestigious publishers as AVON/HarperCollins, Berkley/Penguin/Putnam and Samhain Publishing. KAREN KAY’S great grandmother was Choctaw Indian and Kay is honored to be able to write about the American Indian Culture.
Please refer to http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules for all contest rules.
Updated: August 9, 2017 — 10:04 pm

10 Favorite TV Westerns

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Many of us fell in love with westerns from watching them on television. I know I did. So when Jeannie and I teamed up for this Birthday Bash post, it was easy to collect our favorite TV westerns. We tried to find series that covered a wide range of decades, and since it was difficult to rank them by preference (they’re ALL fabulous!), we decided to list them by premiere date. I hope this takes you down memory lane and maybe even inspires some binge watching.

And speaking of binge watching . . . read to the bottom to see the giveaway Jeannie and I are sponsoring. Super fun!

10 Favorite TV Westerns

1. Maverick (1957-1962)

2. Wagon Train (1957-1965)

3. Rawhide (1959-1965)

4. Bonanza (1959-1973)

5. The Big Valley (1965-1969)

6. The Young Riders (1989-1992)

7. Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (1993-1998)

8. The Magnificent Seven (1998-2000)

9. Longmire (2012-2017)

10. The Pinkertons (2014-?)

 

Giveaway!!!

In honor of these wonderful westerns, Jeannie and I are giving away the first seasons of Rawhide and The Magnificent Seven on DVD as Birthday Bash party favors. WooHoo!!! Hunky cowboys coming your way.

Leave a comment about your favorite TV Western for a chance to win. We will draw two lucky winners, one for each DVD set.

May the commenting commence!

 

P.S. Don’t forget to enter the giant birthday bash giveaway (separate from this daily giveaway). You can find all the details along with the entry form HERE.

Karen Witemeyer
For those who love to smile as they read, bestselling author Karen Witemeyer offers warmhearted historical romance with a flair for humor, feisty heroines, and swoon-worthy Texas heroes. Karen is a firm believer in the power of happy endings. . . and ice cream. She is an avid cross-stitcher, and makes her home in Abilene, TX with her husband and three children. Learn more about Karen and her books at: www.karenwitemeyer.com.

Western Heroes and Heroines

 

 

 

By Karen Kay and Phyliss Miranda

Howdy!  And welcome to another fabulous Tuesday.  And we have with us today best-selling author, and fellow filly, Phyliss Miranda!  Welcome to the Tuesday — and birthday — blog.  Happy Birthday to P & P!  Happy Birthday to P & P!  Happy Birthday Dear P & P, Happy Birthday to us.  (And many more…)

For the birthday bash, Phyliss and I decided to talk a little bit about Western Heroes.  And, as you know, there were many, many Western Heroes, real and fictional.  But today, we’re only going to look at 10 of them. So let’s get started.

Sitting Bull:  Sitting Bull was a Hunkpapa Lakota Indian (Sioux).  He was a Medicine Man and Holy Man.  He led his people during their struggle with the United States government policies.  He actually didn’t fight in the Custer Fight, but he did lead many of his people into Canada after that fight.  Did you know that he also toured with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, and that he considered Annie Oakley (or Little Sure Shot as he named her) an adopted daughter?  A sterling example of a man who put the welfare of his people before his own.

Chief Joseph:  Chief Joseph was a Nez Perce Chief who tried to lead his people out of danger after tensions arose between his own people and the white people.  He tried to bring his people to safety into Canada.  His retreat is considered to this day to be one of the greatest military strategies ever conceived by man.  His name is In-mut-too-yah-lat-lat, and means Thunder coming up over the land from the water (from Indians.org).

Sacagawea:  Sacagawea was a Lemhi Shoshone Indian.  She was married to Toussaint Charbonneau, a Frenchman who had been hired by Lewis and Clark as an interpreter — but only after they learned that his wife, Sacagawea, spoke Shoshone, and they needed her help with the Shoshone tribe during expedition into Indian country.  Sacagawea was pregnant when Lewis and Clark set out upon their expedition and she gave birth to a healthy boy during the expedition.  Clark called her Janey.  Without her help, their expedition might have failed due to the Shoshone’s antagonism toward invaders into their country.  She is an American Legend.

Crazy Horse:  Crazy Horse was an Oglala Lakota Indian (Sioux), who was a contemporary of Sitting Bull, and who joined Sitting Bull in leading the opposition to the reservation system.  Crazy Horse was known as being an extraordinarily handsome man, not overly tall in statue, but he was depicted as being a gentle, handsome, and courteous young man.  Crazy Horse was born a warrior and led his people in their struggle remain free men and women.  He is chiefly credited with the success of the Battle of the Little Big Horn.  He remains a hero to this very day.

Red Cloud:  Red Cloud was another Oglala Lakota Indian (Sioux).  Red Cloud is best known for what is called Red Cloud’s War.  The Bozeman Trail was destroying Indian life and Indian hunting grounds, and when no meeting of mind’s could be found, Red Cloud led an attack that is known as one of the most successful attacks on the miliary, causing the military forts along this route to close.

And Now for Phyliss’s post.

Bat Masterson was born in Quebec, Canada and his birth name was Bartalomiew. After being raised in New York, he ended up in Wichita, Kansas, where he met Wyatt Earp and they became staunch friends. Both being rough, tough buffalo hunters they became “crack shots”. Although Masterson was alleged to have been a part of the shoot-out at the O.K. Corral, he wasn’t, as he had left two days prior to return to Dodge City.

Calamity Jane definitely was part prime and proper Pioneer Woman and a wild and wooly Woman of the West. From 1878 to mid-1800’s, she appeared in nearly twenty Deadwood Dick dime novels.

One of the most famous of all fictional characters was Roy Rogers and Trigger, his golden Palomino. Here’s a few facts of interest:  Roy Rogers was a Master Mason. He played Wild Bill Hickok, William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Jesse James, three of the West’s greatest legends.

After the closure of the Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum in Branson, Missouri, cable network RFD-TV purchased Roy’s dog Bullet who had been preserved after his death for $35,000.00; while Trigger (who was also preserved) was sold for $266,000.00. Trigger had a double Trigger, Jr..   Dale Evans wrote Happy Trails.

Of interest, Wyatt Earp’s Colt .45 revolved, he carried to the famous shootout at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, was sold at auction in 2014 for $225,000.00.

 

“Texas Panhandle, 1881 …

Not only was he tired, hungry, and dirty, but technically, Hayden McGraw guessed, he was still on suspension from the Texas Rangers. The last thing he needed was to become involved in the quarrel that seemed to be brewing in Buffalo Spring, Texas. It wasn’t any of his concern … yet.”

First paragraph to my story “One Woman, One Ranger” in “Give Me a Texas Ranger” anthology by Linda Broday, Jodi Thomas, the late DeWanna Pace and me. The picture was taken at the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas, where our book was put on display in the “Writing the Ranger” exhibit, along with stories and comic books by many famous fictional and real heroes.

Who is your favorite fictional or real cowboy?

And who is your favorite American Indian hero?

Karen Kay will be giving away a free Tradepaper copy of SENECA SURRENDER to one lucky blogger today, and one mass market copy of SOARING EAGLE’S EMBRACE to another lucky blogger.

Product Details

 

To one lucky reader who leaves a comment, Phyliss is giving away both a copy of Give Me a Texas Ranger and a gift card from Bath & Body Works.

 Don’t forget to enter the giant birthday bash giveaway (separate from this daily giveaway).

You can find all the details along with the entry form HERE

     

    

 

Phyliss
A native Texan, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Phyliss Miranda still believes in the Code of the Old West and loves to share her love for antiques, the lost art of quilting, and the Wild West.

Visit her at phylissmiranda.com
Updated: August 8, 2017 — 11:45 am
Petticoats & Pistols © 2015