Category: Mail Order Brides

Mismatched Mail-Order Brides

This summer I started a new fun historical romance series called the Mismatched Mail-Order Brides series.  This series is set in 1892, almost twenty years after first mail-order brides found love in Clear Creek, Kansas, in the Brides with Grit Series. The new series features the girls, whose mothers fell in love and married in the 1873 series.

The older members of the Clear Creek church women’s group, informally known as the Peashooter Society, decide to help the unattached women in town obtain husbands.

The group’s solution, with the backing of a wealthy financier in town, is to advertise that they will offer jobs and housing to the prospective grooms they pick for the unsuspecting women.

The young women are appalled at the idea when they catch wind of the women’s plan—until they see the handsome male finalists. Maybe this will work out after all…until the couples matched, clash.

The first book set up the series, telling of the characters involved in the plan, and then the six couples matched have their own books.

But of course, the couples matched don’t like each other or are attracted to someone else. The stories are sweet and clean, but also thoughtful because of the pasts of each individual.

The six men picked for the husbands bonded when they arrived as children in Kansas on an orphan train and were adopted in the same community. They come to Clear Creek, right after they are discharged from the army, because they want to stay together.

The six women, friends from childhood, haven’t thought about marriage yet because they all have employment and places to live in town.

Then, the Peashooter’s mix up everyone’s lives with their attempts at matchmaking.

Here’s the description from the latest book:

Maisie Brenner, the youngest daughter in the Brides with Grit series book,  grew up on the vast Cross C Ranch. Recently, she and her sisters moved into nearby Clear Creek to take over the town’s dress shop.

The Peashooter Society (the nickname for the older women in town) decides Maisie needs a husband, even though Maisie is perfectly content to sew dresses and gossip with her girlfriends.

Squires Miller, with his brothers and friends, left New York City on an orphan train when Squires was four years old. He was adopted by a man who ran a flour mill and did not have a good childhood. The group of men gets the chance to live and work together in Clear Creek, thanks to the plan of the Peashooter Society.

Because Squires’ has no fear of heights, he earns the available carpenter job, but it doesn’t come with a home, like the jobs the other men get. When the place where Squires was living becomes unavailable due to his roommate’s hasty marriage and adoption of three children, he’s left out in the cold, until he decides to sleep on the stair landing of Maisie’s dress shop apartment.

Do sparks fly? Yes. Will they become a couple? Maybe…

Sounds like a fun series to read, doesn’t it? I’ll pick a random winner from the comments to win a free e-copy of Maisie Swaps her Groom. Thanks for reading my post today. I appreciate it!

 

About the Author

Linda Hubalek has written over forty books about strong women and honorable men, with a touch of humor, despair, and drama woven into the stories. The setting for all the series is the Kansas prairie which Linda enjoys daily, whether by being outside or looking at it through her office window.

Her historical romance series include Brides with Grit, Grooms with Honor, and the Mismatched Mail-Order Brides. Linda’s historical fiction series, based on her ancestors’ pioneer lives include Butter in the Well, Trail of Thread, and Planting Dreams.

When not writing, Linda is reading (usually with dark chocolate within reach), gardening (channeling her degree in Horticulture), or traveling with her husband to explore the world.

Linda loves to hear from her readers, so visit her Website

or go here to see and order all her books: Amazon

 

Updated: September 4, 2019 — 8:23 am

Why We Need Heroes by Patricia PacJac Carroll

I’d heard about the TV show, Yellowstone, and thought I’d give it a try.

Well, I didn’t last the entire show. It’s just not my style or idea of a western.

I like the old kind of stories that I grew up with.

The ones that had a hero.

Where good was good and bad was bad, and the good triumphed over the evil.

And that’s what I write. I believe today we need heroes and heroines. Not that stories have to be Pollyannaish, but I do like stories that end well. Happily-ever-after stories. Our world confronts us with darkness every day, and I, for one, could use a break.

Come away to the 1880s, or to a tale of a knight from the round table, or on another planet. Temporarily escape the pressures of this world and step into the worlds we create to entertain, teach, and encourage.

That’s why I write. My goal is to make readers happy and leave them feeling better than when they started my books.

My alternative to Yellowstone is my series – Montana Brides of Solomon’s Valley. It is set in Montana in the 1880s and begins with Judge Solomon Taggart in The Judge’s Bride. The judge has amassed an empire with the valley’s biggest ranch, some gold, and Shirleyville, a town he named after his late daughter.

In all his wealth, he realized he had no one to share it with or pass it on to. Women are scarce in Montana and the West, so he sends off for a mail-order bride. Add a couple of feuding families and the judge has his hands full.

The Judge’s Bride  Book 1  Love Happens … Even when you have 10 kids. 

Zebulon’s Bride Book 2 He wants to leave home, and then his mother orders him a bride.

The Sheriff’s Bride Book 3  Levi came to town to settle a score but was too late.

Bridgette Book 4. Bridgette is not just a pretty face.

Sarah  Book 5  Her heart is broken, and then the new doctor and preacher come to town.

Cassidy  Book 6 The wildest of the Howards may have met her match.

Ronan’s Bride Book 7 Ronan gets caught up in trouble he can’t get out of, and love might just be the trap that puts him behind bars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 So there you have my answer to Yellowstone. Seven books full of interesting characters, some likable, some who need a little work to get there, but all of the books will leave you feeling good.

My favorite character is Bridgette. She’s smart and has great ideas to help those in need. Of course, she has ambitions to be Queen of Montana. She keeps the town, her husband, and the judge busy with her schemes.

 

What about you? Do you believe we need heroes and heroines?

Post your answer for a chance to win an ebook of your choice from my Montana Brides of Solomon’s Valley series!

 

 

I write Christian historical western romance with a little faith, fun, and always a happily-ever-after.

I am a writer, Christian first, and blessed beyond my imagination. I live in the Dallas-Ft Worth area of Texas with my wonderful treasure of a husband, my spoiled dog, Jacs, and my awesome son, Josh. Did I say I was blessed? The PacJac is from my initials and my husbands. I wouldn’t be able to write if it weren’t for him. I love adventure and the open road. The stories of the western era have always been a favorite of mine. I enjoy writing, and my goal is to write stories readers will enjoy.

Connect with me online:

Website:  http://patriciapacjaccarroll.blogspot.com/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/PacJac    
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/patriciapacjaccarroll
Pinterest:  https://www.pinterest.com/pacjaccarroll/

Have a blessed day,

Patricia PacJac Carroll

The Cowboy Meets His Match & Book Giveaway

His first mistake was marrying her;

                  his second was falling in love.                               

How would you feel if you suddenly found yourself married to the wrong person?  That’s what happened to Chase and Emily in The Cowboy Meets His Match. 

Chase has to marry per his father’s will in order to keep the family ranch. Emily has just traveled to Texas from Boston as a mail-order-bride.  After vows are exchanged and the bride’s veil removed, Chase realizes he’s married to the wrong woman. His new bride has no affinity for cattle and doesn’t even know how to ride a horse! He immediately demands an annulment, but as the following scene shows, that doesn’t work out the way he’d hoped. 

(For a chance to win the book, leave a comment.  Giveaway guidelines apply.)

~~~~~~~~

With a glance at the clerk, the judge drew a handkerchief out of his pocket and dabbed at his sweaty forehead. Replacing the handkerchief, he cleared his throat. “I’m sure this isn’t the first time something like this has happened.” The judge’s hollow laugh was met with scowls. Growing serious, he reached for a leather-bound book and thumbed through the pages.

“Ah, here we are,” he said, sounding relieved. “Annulment.” Adjusting his spectacles, he quickly scanned the page. “This should only take a few minutes. You just have to answer a few questions.” Finger holding his spot, he looked up and asked in all seriousness, “Why do you want an annulment?”

Chase reared back. “Why? Because I married the wrong woman, that’s why!”

“Yes, yes, yes, I know that.” The judge stabbed the page with his finger. “But that’s not listed here as legitimate grounds for annulment.”

The uncle jabbed the muzzle of his shotgun on the floor and placed both hands on the butt. “What are legitimate grounds?”

The judge’s finger moved down the page. “Bigamy, for one.” He looked up. “Are either of you married?”

“Yes, we’re married,” Chase said, his voice thick with impatience. “To each other!”

The uncle stared straight at Emily. “I think he’s asking if either one of you is married to someone else.”

Emily’s eyes flashed him a look of disdain. If it wasn’t for him and his veiled threats, neither she nor Chase would be in this predicament. “I’m not married. Or at least I wasn’t until a few minutes ago.”

The judge checked the book again. “Okay, forget that. Are either of you underage?” The judge had directed the question to her.

“I’m twenty-two,” Emily said.

“Twenty-six,” Chase said.

The judge’s finger moved down the page again. “Are either of you related to the other?”

Chase shook his head. “Absolutely not.”

The judge peered at them over the frame of his spectacles. “Are either of you”—he cleared his throat—“unable to consummate the marriage?”

Emily’s face flared, and Chase threw up his hands. “This is getting us nowhere.”

The judge held up the palm of a hand. “Now hold on. There’s more.” He glanced at the uncle’s shotgun. “Were either of you coerced into the marriage?”

Emily felt a flicker of hope, but before she had a chance to answer in the affirmative, the door flew open. A man stormed into the chambers with a bride in tow, and he looked fit to be tied.

The uncle stepped in front of the new arrivals, his shotgun raised in a threatening pose. The newly arrived bride gasped and fell back.

“Sorry, Royce,” the uncle said. “You’re too late. The will said the first one married will have full ownership of the ranch.” He tossed a nod at Emily. “Meet Mrs. Chase McKnight, your new sister-in-law.”

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Updated: May 22, 2019 — 1:44 pm

Not Always by Choice: Mail-Order Brides

I love reading and writing mail-order bride stories set in the Old West.  I’m happy to say that next month my next mail-order bride story The Cowboy Meets His Match will be published. And boy, oh, boy, does that couple ever clash!

It’s hard to imagine a young woman traveling west to marry a man she’d never set eyes on. The original catalog-bride business grew out of necessity. The lack of marriageable women in the west was partly responsible, but so was the Civil War. The war not only created thousands of widows but a shortage of men, especially in the South.

As a result, marriage brokers and heart-and-hand catalogs popped up all around the country. According to an article in the Toledo Blade, lonely men even wrote to the Sears catalog company asking for brides. (The latest such letter received by Sears was from a lonely marine during the Vietnam War.)

In those early days, advertisements cost five to fifteen cents, and letters were exchanged along with photographs. Fortunately, the telegraph and train made communication easier.

Not all marriage brokers were legitimate, and many a disappointed client ended up with an empty bank account rather than a contracted mate.

For some mail-order couples, it was love (or lust) at first sight. In 1886, one man and his mail-order bride were so enamored with each other that they scandalized fellow passengers on the Union Pacific Railroad during their honeymoon.

Not every bride was so lucky. In her book Hearts West, Chris Enss tells the story of mail-order bride Eleanor Berry. On the way to her wedding, her stage was held up at gunpoint by four masked men. While signing the marriage license, she suddenly realized that her new husband was one of the outlaws who had robbed her.

No one seems to know how many mail-order brides there were during the 1800s, but the most successful matchmaker of all appears to be Fred Harvey.  He wasn’t in the mail-order bride business, but, by the turn of the century, five thousand Harvey Girls had found husbands while working in his restaurants.

Under what circumstances might you have traveled west to marry a stranger?

His first mistake was marrying her; his second was falling in love.

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Updated: April 20, 2019 — 8:56 am