Category: Guest Author

Gina Danna: Rags and Hope (plus Giveaway)

A Story of the West during The War of the Rebellion

The West – conjures up pictures of Cowboys and Indians, covered wagons, Wild Bill Hitchcock, saloons, gunslingers and Wyoming or Colorado, etc. But did you know that leading up to and including the Civil War, the ‘west’ was what we call today the Midwest – like Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas and Ohio. Huh? The original 13 colonies/states (New York to Maine, to Pennsylvania, Carolinas, etc) was considered the civilized society and anything past the Appalachian Mountains is the West.

When the Civil War is discussed even today, it is a story of the North and the South but what about the West? The Midwest was the food-producing states. Both sides counted it as theirs. Missouri, for instance, was the ‘west’, with no status as North or South until “Bloody Kansas” occurred. Newspapers in the North wrote their stories, painting the slave-holding Missouri as Southern. Missouri had a lot of ties to the north from an economic standard, being a bread-winning state and St. Louis was one of the nation’s highest importing towns, that you could by any import there, verses New York or New Orleans or Charleston (the other big ports).

Many businesses in St. Louis were tied to the North but this slanderous news stories propagated at this time during the crisis pushed Missouri in a corner, so to speak, and therefore, they did throw their hat in with the South. Many southerners did settle in the state and it was a slave state but that didn’t make them southerner. Even today, northerners referred to Missouri as southern and vice versa.

 When the war comes, it concentrates on the east and the prime objective by the north was ‘take Richmond!’ – the old concept of take the capital (yet at first, the capital for the Confederacy was in Alabama). The push was take the Army of Northern Virginia, led by the mastermind Robert E. Lee, out, take over Richmond and the North wins! But what of the west? The West does include more than the battles at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Franklin. The west was also the breadbasket of the South (& North) but the key to conquering the rebels was the Mississippi River. Take it and cut the Confederacy in half (plus cutting them from their main food source –Texas).

The western theater also became the dumping ground by both sides for officers that lost favor in the east. General Halleck (US), Rosecrans (US), Braxton Bragg (CS), Joseph E. Johnston (CS) are good examples, like Johnston and President Jefferson Davis didn’t get along, but the South needed men, so Johnston was kept, just reassigned to the west. Sounds pretty awful, right?

My latest release, Rags & Hope, deals with this issue.Here is the blurb:

There was one thing about the War of Rebellion they could both understand: At least on the battlefield, the enemy is clear.

Thanks to his father’s political machinations, grieving widower Colonel Pierce Duval wants nothing more than to leave his family home in New York and return to his Union command in Tennessee. A chance and harrowing encounter with a true-blue Southern belle stirs emotions in him he thought long buried. When her safety is at stake, how can he not help her? 

Cerisa Fontaine ran away from her wealthy Louisiana home, hoping to form a new life where no one would know her family’s awful secret. But her controversial marriage and southern drawl make her a pariah in New York. Her situation becomes downright perilous when her husband is killed in battle and Cerisa is left alone and penniless, forced to seek employment at the only establishment that will accept her: a brothel. When the handsome colonel offers her a way out, she’s compelled to accept despite his Yankee roots.

Each for self-serving reasons of their own, Pierce and Cerisa embark on a journey south to Tennessee, posing as a married couple. But even as their secrets stand between them, their passion wages its own war against their better judgment. All too soon, they must make a life altering choice: remain loyal to their cause, or give in to their heart’s desire.

To Order Click Here 

I’m giving away a digital copy of my book Rags and Hope. For a chance to win, please leave a comment. (Giveaway guidelines apply.)

Updated: April 9, 2018 — 4:51 pm

Jodi Thomas: Quilter of Words & Book Giveaway

My new novel, MORNINGS ON MAIN, is about a quilt shop in a small town called Laurel Springs, Texas.  Since I don’t quilt some people might think the setting strange for me, but they don’t know my family.

 My grandmother was born in a covered wagon and I’m sure there were quilts surrounding her.  My mother quilted all her life, even after she’d lost the names of her children to Alzheimer’s, she quilted.  Both of my sisters quilt. (See picture of mother’s quilt with books on top.)

 In a very real way the history of our family is woven into the squares of a hundred years of quilts.  So, setting a story in a quilt shop made sense.

 I also wanted to weave into this small town story the fact that it’s not so important where you live your life sometimes, but how you live it.  I think sometimes people think if they live in some exciting place like Paris that they somehow live a richer, bigger life.  Sometimes when I’m traveling people ask me, ‘You live in Amarillo.  Why?’  

If they only knew…

When I first started writing, my husband knew how much I loved this Lone Star Quilt my mother made.  So he went to an artist in town and said simply, “I’ve got two questions for you.  One, can you put this quilt and my wife’s books in a painting?  And, two, can I afford it?”

Arvis Stewart must have laughed, but he said,  “We’ll make it work.”That Christmas when Tom gave me the painting, I cried. (See picture of painting Tom gave me. My student intern Nicole McGee is holding it.)

 Early settlers made quilts from scraps and flour sacks so they could keep their family warm.  Pictures of early picnics, wagon beds and clotheslines often show quilts, but we can’t see the colors.  Yet I know that those quilts must have added a great deal of color to their lives.  Now, those quilts, some worn and over a hundred years old still add not only color to my life, but also a source of ideas for books.

 Step into MORNINGS ON MAIN and fall in love with the people of Laurel Springs lives and see their beautiful quilts in your mind.  When my mother read my first book, she said, “Jodi, you quilt with words.”

 I hope you will stop by and visit with me about your quilts, and I would love to see a picture. One lucky winner will be drawn to receive a copy of MORNINGS ON MAIN. (Giveaway guidelines apply).

 

Here’s where you can purchase Mornings on Main

Amazon

B&N

 

 

Updated: April 7, 2018 — 6:49 am

Caroline Clemmons Shares Her Downfall & Book Giveaway

Thank you for the exciting honor of being on Petticoats and Pistols. Yee Haw!

I will give away an e-copy of DANIEL McCLINTOCK to two people who comment. (Giveaway guidelines apply.)

I love research but it’s my downfall. One thing leads to another and the next thing I know I’ve spent precious minutes/hours falling down the rabbit hole. That’s not too bad, since I believe knowledge is never wasted. (Well, I’m not so sure about algebra since I’m a writer. ?) Research tangents can wreak havoc with a schedule.

Because I like to have unusual twists and occupations in my books, I’ve learned some intriguing things. For instance, did you know that long ago women were hired to mine the small, narrow crevices of coal mines? Or, that they worked in such hot conditions that they wore only a wide sash around their hips?

I learned that irrelevant tidbit researching for O’NEILL’S TEXAS BRIDE (McClintocks book two). Even though the hero has to solve a mystery at a coal mine, this is a western. He’s involved in a trade: find the culprit who’s sabotaging the mine and he gets the money to buy a horse ranch. I wasn’t searching for ancient mining or even Regency era mines. I wanted information on Texas coal mines in the late 1800s. Fortunately, I found enough to make my book credible.

Later in the McClintock series, I researched the early beginnings of physical therapy for DANIEL McCLINTOCK, McClintocks book four. In the previous book, McCLINTOCK’S RELUCTANT BRIDE, I left that hero’s younger brother Daniel paralyzed from the waist down.

Oooh, the angry emails! The gist was that if I didn’t write a book to help Daniel I would lose many readers. These are romance books, so of course I would write his book. My goal is to entertain and leave readers with a happy glow. If we want to be depressed, we can watch the evening news.

I spent several hours researching Daniel’s problem and the origins of physical therapy. By a stroke of good luck (or angels watching over me) I met a man who had been paralyzed from the waist down just like Daniel. This man, who didn’t even use a cane or limp, told me how he regained use of his legs—and the process involved things I would not have found in research.

In DANIEL McCLINTOCK, Daniel has gone from being a shy, kind, hard-working young man to one who is depressed and cynical. You can see how that might happen, right? This book is a sweet romance with the exception of the words “damn” and “hell”.

After being used to ranching all his life, his abilities have been stolen from him by a villain’s bullet. At twenty-two, he fears he’s facing a lifetime of what he feels is being useless. He’s trapped in a shell of his former self.

However, Daniel isn’t totally idle. He paints beautiful pictures that he sells in the mercantile then donates the proceeds to the church. Keeping ranch records for his father is a definite boon for the older McClintock. Secretly, Daniel writes poetry. But, as his younger sister Rebecca accuses, he is grumpy as an old bear.

In Amsterdam, Clara Van Hoosan has been training as a heilgymnast in the new mechanotherapy field. At twenty two, she has had amazing success but faces the battle of patients preferring a man as their therapist. When a request comes from America, she is thrilled when her mentor suggests her—but she uses her initials rather than reveal she’s a woman.

Do you think Daniel will welcome Clara to help him? If you said no, you’re correct. Let me share the scene of their first meeting. Kathryn is Daniel’s mother.

DANIEL McCLINTOCK Excerpt:

Clara followed Kathryn to the room next door. When she entered, she stopped and stared. Daniel wasn’t a boy as she had imagined—he was a man her age or older. And, as handsome as any man she’d ever met.

Kathryn introduced them to one another.

“You’re not serious!” Daniel’s glare chilled Clara as he assessed her head to toe and back up. “You said a man was arriving. You think I’m going to work with this… woman?”

He looked away and made a dismissive wave with his hand. “Forget it and get her out of here.”

Kathryn offered Clara a helpless expression then left the room.

Clara stepped forward, forcing herself to assume her professional demeanor. She had faced this reaction before, but this was so much more important. As much as she longed to help anyone in his position, this man also represented her chance to establish herself in America.

“Daniel, I am here to help you learn to walk again. I have a contract and have moved into the room next door, so you might as well get used to having me here.”

His blue eyes were glacial. “I. Said. Get. Out.”

As if he hadn’t spoken, she continued, “I have completed courses in nursing and mechanotherapy and have helped dozens of people like you recover the use of their limbs. One of your workers has gone to the rail depot to claim my trunks. Inside two of them I have equipment which I will assemble here in your room.”

He threw a book at her but it landed at her feet. “I am not letting you near me.”

She picked up the book, glanced at the title. “Hmm, Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. I have wanted to read this. Thank you.” She laid it on the washstand.

“Give me my damned book.”

She smiled but didn’t return the tome. “But, you gave it to me.”

“You know very well I didn’t.” Using his arms and hands, he pushed up higher on his pillows. “You deliberately misled us by using your initials instead of your first name.”

She widened her eyes and blinked at him. “Oh? I believe it is customary to use initials in business correspondence.”

He crossed his arms over his chest. “Don’t give me that innocent expression. You knew we thought you were a man—which is what you intended. I’m not having a woman working on me.”

Clara tapped a finger against her cheek. “I was under the impression your mother has been working with you to insure your leg muscles do not deteriorate. You were not averse to her and she is a woman.”

“That’s different.”

“She faces prejudice because she is a woman healer. I would think you, as her son who is aware of this, would be more tolerant of other women healers.”

“What she does is entirely different than what you supposedly do.”

“Not so. Each of us does our best to help people. In spite of your low opinion of me, I am going to be helping you for some time. I will be in early tomorrow to help you get ready for the day. After breakfast, I will begin assembling my equipment. You will find it fascinating. For now, good evening.” She reclaimed the book and carried it with her.

He yelled after her, “Bring me back my damned book!”

She smiled to herself as she walked to her room. She thought she had come out best in that round. Tomorrow would begin round two.

DANIEL McCLINTOCK, McClintocks book four, is available from Amazon:

Click Here To Order Daniel McClintock

The first book in the series, THE TEXAN’S IRISH BRIDE. To order a permafree copy Click Here

Book two is O’NEILL’S TEXAS BRIDE: Click Here to Order

Book three is McCLINTOCK’S RELUCTANT BRIDE: Click Here To Order

My question for you is, do you enjoy research?

 

A LITTLE ABOUT CAROLINE

Through a crazy twist of fate, Caroline Clemmons was not born on a Texas ranch. To make up for this tragic error, she writes about handsome cowboys, feisty ranch women, and scheming villains in a small office her family calls her pink cave. She and her Hero live in North Central Texas cowboy country where they ride herd on their rescued cats and dogs. The books she creates there have made her an Amazon bestselling author and won numerous awards. Find her on her blog, website, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Google+, and Pinterest.

Click on her for a complete list of her books and follow her there.

Follow her on BookBub.

Subscribe to Caroline’s newsletter here to receive a FREE novella of HAPPY IS THE BRIDE, a humorous historical wedding disaster that ends happily—but you knew it would, didn’t you?

 

 

 

Updated: April 5, 2018 — 1:22 pm

Amanda Cabot: Fort Robinson – A Story of Reinvention

Ready for a trip to northwestern Nebraska’s beautiful Pine Ridge area?  I hope so, because today we’re going to visit Fort Robinson, a former army post that’s the poster child for reinvention.

It all started with the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868 in which the government agreed to provide food and supplies, what some called annuities, to the Native American tribes who agreed to live on reservations.  In 1873 the government established the Red Cloud Indian Agency at what is now Fort Robinson to distribute those annuities to Red Cloud’s Ogalala Sioux.  Unfortunately, not everything went as smoothly as some might have expected.  When nontreaty bands of Indians threatened the agency, demanding supplies, shots broke out, resulting in several deaths, including that of the acting agent.  But it was the death of Lt. Levi Robinson near Fort Laramie on February 9, 1874 that had the greatest impact on the area, since when troops were sent to establish a tent camp to protect the agency, they honored the lieutenant by naming it Camp Robinson.

Two months later, the camp was moved a mile and a half away from the original site, and tents were replaced by the permanent log and adobe buildings of what is now called the “old post.”

Primary responsibilities of the soldiers stationed at Camp Robinson were protecting the Red Cloud Agency and keeping the peace during the Indian wars.  As you might guess, that proved difficult, and the camp’s history includes the death of Crazy Horse, who was mortally wounded in a scuffle when resisting imprisonment in 1877, and the Cheyenne Breakout of 1879, which resulted in the deaths of 64 Cheyenne and eleven soldiers.

Though the Red Cloud Agency was relocated to a Missouri River site in 1877, Camp Robinson remained an important part of the western military, and in 1878, its permanence was recognized by renaming it Fort Robinson.

More changes were coming.  When the railroad reached the fort in 1887, the army expanded the post, creating what was in essence a new post, complete with a much larger parade ground and additional housing, all needed because it had become the regimental headquarters for the Ninth Cavalry, a unit of African American soldiers. 

Within a short time, Fort Robinson had surpassed Fort Laramie as the most important military post in the area.

Times changed, and by WWI the fort was all but abandoned.  Abandoned, but not forgotten, because in 1919, it became the quartermaster remount depot, providing horses and mules to the army.  When the army replaced horses and mules with motorized vehicles, Fort Robinson was once again in limbo.

Time for more reinvention.  From 1933 through 1935, it became a regional headquarters for the Civilian Conservation Corps, and during WWII it was not only a site for K-9 training but – more importantly – a camp for 3,000 German POWs.  After WWII, the USDA turned it into a beef research station, and then in the 1950s it had its final reinvention, emerging as Fort Robinson State Park, a place where you can not only learn about history but where you can also spend a night or two in the same buildings where the army once lived.

What does all this have to do with my new release?  Very little.  A Borrowed Dream takes place in the Texas Hill Country, not Nebraska’s Pine Ridge.  Its characters have no connection to the military.  But like the fort itself, they’ve had to reinvent themselves.  Catherine’s life has been shattered by her mother’s death and the realization that the man she had hoped to marry was fickle, while Austin has had to flee Philadelphia, abandoning his life as a successful surgeon to protect his daughter.  What choice do they have but to create new lives?

I hope you enjoyed reading about Fort Robinson and hope it’s piqued your interest.  And, of course, I hope you’re intrigued by the premise of

There is no such thing as an impossible dream . . .

 Catherine Whitfield is sure that she will never again be able to trust anyone in the medical profession after the local doctor’s treatments killed her mother. Despite her loneliness and her broken heart, she carries bravely on as Cimarron Creek’s dutiful schoolteacher, resigned to a life where dreams rarely come true.

Austin Goddard is a newcomer to Cimarron Creek. Posing as a rancher, he fled to Texas to protect his daughter from a dangerous criminal. He’s managed to keep his past as a surgeon a secret. But when Catherine Whitfield captures his heart, he wonders how long he will be able to keep up the charade.

With a deft hand, Amanda Cabot teases out the strands of love, deception, and redemption in this charming tale of dreams deferred and hopes becoming reality.

I’m offering a signed copy of it to one commenter. 

US addresses only.

Amanda Cabot is the bestselling author of more than thirty novels including the Texas Dreams trilogy, the Westward Winds series, the Texas Crossroads trilogy, A Stolen Heart, and Christmas Roses. A former director of Information Technology, she has written everything from technical books and articles for IT professionals to mysteries for teenagers and romances for all ages.  Amanda is delighted to now be a fulltime writer of Christian romances, living happily ever after with her husband in Wyoming.

Social Media Links:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Blog

Buy Links:

Barnes & Noble   |   Christian Book Distributors

Amanda Cabot Visits the Junction on Friday!

Miz Amanda Cabot has climbed in the saddle and will be here on Friday, March 23, 2018!

What do you know about Fort Robinson in Wyoming? This dear talented lady is going to tell us about that remarkable piece of history.

And….She’s toting a print copy of her new book to giveaway!

But you have to comment to enter the drawing.

Come and join us. Prop up your feet and sit a spell.

We’d love to see your shiny face!   

Updated: March 18, 2018 — 10:23 am

Godey’s Lady’s Book and Regina Scott’s New Release

I will admit to scanning online sites every spring and fall to discover the latest fashions trends. My heroine Beth Wallin in Frontier Matchmaker Bride has a greater passion for fashion, even on the frontier of 1875 Washington Territory. Her go-to source, pictured on the cover of her story, is Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Godey’s was the brainchild of Louis A. Godey, who saw the growing need for a magazine tailored specifically to the lady of the house. He hired a female editor, Sarah J. Hale, herself an author (often remembered for writing “Mary Had a Little Lamb”), who also ensured the rest of the staff was predominantly female. In fact, Godey boasted at having a corps of 150 female colorers who hand-tinted the fashion plates that started every issue.

The early issues of Godey’s carried articles taken from British women’s magazines. The magazine even had its own reporter simply to chronicle royal activities across the Pond. Though Sarah Hale was purportedly a huge fan of Queen Victoria, she wanted more of an American angle for the magazine. She was also a staunch supporter of women’s rights, believing that women needed to be redeemed from their “inferior” position and placed as an equal helpmate to man in every way.

She therefore commissioned articles, essays, stories, and poetry from American writers including Harriet Beecher Stowe and Frances Hodgson Burnett. Male luminaries Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allen Poe, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow also contributed. Articles covered health and science, crafts, dancing, horseback riding, home decorating, and recipes. Every issue included two pages of new sheet music for the pianoforte.

And women paid for the privilege of reading it. Subscriptions ran three dollars a year when other popular magazines of the time were only two dollars. The magazine was delivered by post all over the United States, from the gilded mansions on Boston’s Beacon Hill to the rustic ranches of the Texas Hill Country and the log cabins of Seattle.

Despite its broad coverage, Godey’s steered clear of politics. The Civil War was never mentioned in its pages. One source I consulted claimed that readership was cut by a third from its high of 150,000 subscribers during the war, implying that it was because of Godey’s non-political stance. I’m more inclined to believe that the magazine’s subscriptions fell during that time because women were counting pennies as husbands and fathers went off to war.

Regardless, Godey’s popularity led it to become a major force in America. The magazine is credited with popularizing a white wedding gown (after Victoria wore one in England), the use of a Christmas tree to crown that celebration, and the creation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday.

It even inspired Beth Wallin to create gowns far above those usually found on the frontier, thanks to a sister-in-law who is a seamstress and her own good taste. This is one of the gowns I pictured for her.

Giveaway

So, do you consider yourself a fashionista? What’s your go-to source?

Answer in the comments to be entered into a drawing for an autographed copy of Beth’s story, Frontier Matchmaker Bride.

The Lawman Meets His Match

Spunky Beth Wallin is determined to find a bride for Deputy Hart McCormick, the man who once spurned her affections.

After tragically losing his sweetheart, Hart vowed never to love again. He might be Beth’s first matchmaking miss, unless they can both admit that she would be his perfect match.

You can find the book on Amazon today: https://www.amazon.com/Frontier-Matchmaker-Bride-Bachelors-ebook/dp/B073B2NKQ3/a?tag=pettpist-20

 

 

About the Author

Regina Scott started writing novels in the third grade. Thankfully for literature as we know it, she didn’t actually sell her first Regency romance novel until she had learned a bit more about writing such as vocabulary, sentence structure, and plot. After numerous short stories and articles in magazines and trade journals, she got serious about her novel writing. The Regency romance The Unflappable Miss Fairchild was her first novel to be published (March 1998). In 2011, she was delighted to move into Christian romance with the publication of The Irresistible Earl. Her novels have been translated into Dutch, German, Italian, and Portuguese; and a large number have been issued in hardcover, large print editions. She has twice won the prestigious RT Book Reviews Reviewer’s Choice award for best historical Christian romance of its type, for The Heiress’s Homecoming in 2013 and Would-Be Wilderness Wife in 2015.

Connect with her online at her website or sign up for her newsletter.

Diane Kalas introduces Honor Bound

Last March 2017, I introduced HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1, to readers of Petticoats and Pistols blog and the response delighted me. I am hooked on research and enjoy sharing it with readers. Please join in the discussion.

My current release is HONOR BOUND, An Inspirational Historical Romance Set in the West, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2.

I will gladly gift a paperback copy of HONOR BOUND to someone leaving a comment.

I will also gift a paperback copy of HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1, to another reader leaving a comment.

Captain Joseph Hawthorn, a character from book 1 is the hero of HONOR BOUND. Story opens in August 1875 and ends in May 1876, days before the 7th Cavalry departs Ft. Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory, in pursuit of the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. Joe lost his fiancée to another officer of the 7th Cavalry in book 1, and learned the painful results of his arrogant behavior. Joe is a redeemed man now, although cautious about entering into a relationship with Ivy O’Hanlon, the girl who is determined to have him tutor her brother. With a spring campaign planned against the hostile Indians, he must consider Ivy should he not survive as an officer in Custer’s 7th Cavalry.

As a writer who has tackled serious subjects before, I enjoy adding humor. Davey O’Hanlon is a sixteen-year-old boy who idolizes Custer’s officers and wants to “go with Custer,” an idea that strikes terror into the heart of his sister, Ivy O’Hanlon. Readers will learn about the US Military Academy, known as West Point, and cadet training in the 1870s. Davey’s journey is pure fun to read. In addition, Ivy becomes a matchmaker for Sergeant Major MacIntyre, father of four redheaded sons in need of another wife. Love it!

Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer had many sides to his personality that have been well documented by family members, friends, and military leaders in numerous letters, books, newspaper articles, and interviews during his lifetime and afterward. My research unveiled events I never knew happened to the boy-general during that last year of his life.

Have you ever thought of Custer as a whistler-blower? Would you risk your career and take a stand against officials in your government when you knew they were lying to tax-paying citizens and cheating people, both the Indians and the Army’s enlisted men? I hope I have caught your interest.

Another facet to Custer’s last months of life was that he stood at a crossroads. Although, I believe Custer did not think of the drama that unfolded around him that spring of 1876 as a crossroads where he could take a different course of action other than what he pursued. I hope you are intrigued even more.

Each book in Officers of the 7th Cavalry takes the reader closer to the final event in the Little Bighorn Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and 268 troopers, including civilian and Indian scouts, and civilian family members of Custer lost their lives June 25, 1876.

Coming in spring 2019: HONOR FIRST, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 3. You will learn who survived the Custer massacre and who did not return to Ft. Lincoln from books 1 and 2.

HONOR BOUND

An Inspirational Historical Romance Set in the West

Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2

August 1875. Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory. Lieutenant Joseph Hawthorn’s career goals in the United States Army Cavalry, centered upon exceeding Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s military achievements. Joe eagerly awaits the 1876 spring campaign with Custer and the famous 7th Cavalry in pursuit of the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians.

August 1875. Bismarck, Dakota Territory. Ivy O’Hanlon and her brother arrive in the Dakota Territory to live with their uncle who owns a tavern. Ivy has a huge problem. Her conscience will not allow her brother to assist Uncle Grady behind the bar. At 16, Davey idolizes Custer’s officers and wants to join the 7th Cavalry. Ivy fears losing her brother to the Army, but reluctantly decides the cavalry was better for Davey than working in the tavern.

With a ruined engagement behind him, the last thing Joe needs is to meet a beautiful woman with an Irish temperament, who is determined to help her brother pass the entrance exam into the U.S. Military Academy. As an officer and gentleman Joe could not refuse to tutor Davey O’Hanlon.

Ivy finds Lieutenant Joseph Hawthorn more than a golden-haired officer with vivid blue eyes. He is intensely serious, although manages to capture her romantic interest. For Joe, he tries to resist lovely Ivy O’Hanlon’s charm. After all, he may not return from the Indian campaign scheduled next spring 1876, as the 7th Cavalry heads to the Little Bighorn River valley.

Author Bio:

Diane Kalas, author of Inspirational Historical Romance, collects antique books written by men and women who lived through the American Civil War, and/or who pioneered out West. With a degree in interior design, she enjoys touring historical sites, especially Federal era homes with period furniture. Diane’s biggest challenge is writing Inspirational Historical Romance. Her biggest distraction is her fascination with historical research. Published writers Pamela Griffin, Gina Welborn, and Kathleen Maher have been critique partners and mentors. Diane is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers.

Diane’s novels are available on Amazon in E-book and paperback versions.

HONOR BRIGHT, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 1

HONOR BOUND, Officers of the 7th Cavalry 2

 PATRIOT HEART, Journey Home Series 1

FAITHFUL HEART, Journey Home Series 2

HOPEFUL HEART, Journey Home Series 3

Diane Kalas links:

Facebook | Blog | Pinterest | Twitter

Amazon:  https://tinyurl.com/y7odz5f5

You can also find her at: forgetmenotromances.com/authors/diane-kalas/

Barbara J. Scott shares Dreams of My Heart

Hello Reader! Thank you for joining Petticoats and Pistols on Mountain Brook Ink’s “Romantic Reads Blog Tour.” Follow the tour schedule below from February 23 – March 2 for opportunities to win free e-books, Amazon gift cards, and the grand prize, a Kindle Fire HD. Comment on this post and join the conversation for an opportunity to win a free e-book from Barbara J. Scott. To enter for the Kindle Fire or a giftcard, click the rafflecopter link below. We hope you’ll discover a new favorite author and make some new friends! Have fun!

***

I am super excited to visit Petticoats & Pistols today, home to many of my western writing heroes— Mary Connealy, Ruth Logan Herne, Karen Witemeyer, Margaret Brownley, and so many others.

I cut my teeth on TV westerns!

Back in the 1950s when I was a child, our family religiously watched Gunsmoke, The Roy Rogers Show, The Gene Autry Show, The Lone Ranger, The Rifleman, Wagon Train, Have Gun Will Travel, Rawhide, Maverick, and so many more westerns—all on a small black-and-white TV. We didn’t need color TV to fall in love with those handsome, rugged heroes. We used our imaginations. Mom read Zane Grey books, and until the day she passed away, kept a framed picture of Roy Rogers on top of her color TV set.

So, when I returned to writing after a long career as a Christian acquisitions editor, is it any surprise the first book I would write for the sheer joy of it takes place in 1875 Montana Territory? I am over the moon that Dreams of My Heart, Book 1 in The Reluctant Brides series, releases April 1 as an ebook and shortly after in paperback. The book is already up on Amazon to preorder. Thanks to Miralee Farrell at Mountain Brook Ink who fell in love with my Texas cattleman Buck McKean and feisty Irish immigrant Kate O’Brien—two wounded heartswho end up hitched after less than twenty-four hours to save her reputation. Talk about a whirlwind wedding! How do you court a prickly woman you’ve already married? Kate is featured on the cover of my book against a background of Montana wildflowers.

My heroine is no pushover. Like many immigrant pioneer women, she’s a survivor. She fights to hang on to her brother’s homestead after he’s killed in a suspicious cattle stampede. If she can’t repay the bank loan her brother took out to bring her to America, she’ll be forced to marry the banker’s rotten son or be forced into making a living in town with few skills. But she has guardian angels who attend church with her who aren’t going to let that happen.

Still, Kate won’t be controlled by any man, not after escaping an abusive stepfather. If she has to dress in men’s britches to chop wood, milk the cow, muck the stalls, harvest the garden, or use her brother’s shotgun to drive away a drunken gang sent to harass her, she’s up to the task.

Women who pioneered the West had to toughen up to survive, especially when left on their own in untamed territory. They could fall prey to grizzly bears or unsavory men, die of snake bite, or contract any number of diseases, not to mention accidents.

I chose Deer Lodge Valley as the setting of my series because my best friend grew up in the town of Deer Lodge and had shared its stories with me for years. Gwen Ellis is a Montana woman through and through. She was raised on deer and elk meat her parents hunted, along with fish caught in the famous Montana streams. Garden vegetables were canned and put in the cellar to eat all winter. There’s no task too hard for Gwen. She’s a survivor.

Buck and Kate, both strong-minded individuals, learn as winter closes in that they need each other to survive and overcome the rigors of living in the Old West. They realize two are stronger than one, and eventually, their faith softens their hearts toward each other despite many dangerous twists and turns along the way.

 Here’s a Peek at Barbara’s new book

Can A Reluctant Bride and Her New Husband Fall in Love Despite Their Wounded Hearts?

Plucky Irish immigrant Kate O’Brien struggles to hang on to her brother’s homestead after his death in a suspicious cattle stampede. If she’s unable to pay off the loan that paid for her ticket to America, she will be forced to marry the banker’s rogue son, Rafe Hamilton.

When Kate is attacked by a drunken gang, salvation comes in the form of a total stranger—Texas cattleman Buck McKean. He drives the men off her ranch and spends the night in her cabin to keep her safe. However, his act of kindness poses a profound threat to her reputation, and the two marry to prevent the impending consequences.

Kate makes it clear to her new husband that because of the abuse she suffered at the hands of her stepfather, she’ll never allow another man to control her life. Left at the altar in Virginia City, Buck has made his own vow never to give his heart to another woman.

When Kate asks Buck for the unthinkable, her choice endangers both their lives.
Can God mend their hearts and save their love?

 For a chance to win 1 of 2 ebooks of Dreams of My Heart,

tell us the dream of your heart that you hope will come true.

 The book can also be pre-ordered at Amazonhttp://a.co/eIITbFb

About Barbara

Barbara J. Scott, an inspirational author and editor, released her first novella with Gilead Publishing in late 2016 titled “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” that appears in the Sleigh Bells Ring novella collection. Her latest novel, Dreams of My Heart, the first book in the Reluctant Brides historical romance series, will be released April 1, 2018, by Mountain Brook Ink. Her best-selling novels Sedona Storm and Secrets of the Gathering Darkness, both contemporary spiritual warfare novels, were written with co-author Carrie Younce and published by Thomas Nelson in the mid-1990s. She has years of publishing experience and has written several novels, screenplays, and gift books.

Barbara and her husband Mike live in the Nashville area with their two Chihuahuas, Riley and Sissy, both rescued from puppy mills. Reading, writing, and research are her passions.

Barbara Loves Hearing from Readers

Website – http://www.barbarajscott.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BarbaraJScott01

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BarbaraScott01

Blog Tour Schedule:
February 23: Angela Ruth Strong w/ Shannon Vannatter
February 23: Angela Ruth Strong w/ Caffinated Reads
February 24: Angela Ruth Strong w/ Books, Music, and Life
February 25: Patricia Lee w/ Books N Baubles
February 25: Patricia Lee w/ Miralee Ferrell
February 26: Patricia Lee w/ Christian Shelf-Esteem
February 27: Janalyn Voigt w/ Among the Reads
February 27: Janalyn Voigt w/ Homemade Mythology
February 28: Janalyn Voigt w/ Debbie Lynne Costello
March 1: Barbara J. Scott w/ Kat’s Corner Books
March 1: Barbara J. Scott w/ April Erin
March 2: Barbara J. Scott w/ Petticoats & Pistols

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Welcome Guest – Amanda Renee

 

Farrier Fascination

Happy New Year and Happy early Valentine’s Day!

I’ve wanted to write a Valentine’s story for years, and was lucky enough to do so before my beloved Harlequin Western Romance line closes this year. WRANGLING CUPID’S COWBOY is not only a holiday romance, it has allowed me to share my fascination with the age-old art of farriering.

Many moons ago, I worked on a large reining horse ranch in Northern New Jersey. Up until that point I had always thought of farriers as people who trimmed hooves and put shoes on horses. I hadn’t realized that many farriers work alongside equine veterinarians and provide therapeutic and corrective shoeing to horses suffering from hoof disorders, trauma, neglect and other injuries.

The reddish orange glow of our resident farrier’s forge drew me in and I became captivated watching him precisely sculpt each shoe with what seemed like the most primitive of tools. From the first rise of steam when the shoe met the horse’s hoof, I knew I wanted to write a farrier story. Back then I had always assumed it would be about a male farrier because that’s all I had ever heard about. Years later, I moved to the deep south and discovered most of the farriers in my area are women. The story idea once again began to rattle around in my brain, but I hadn’t given it the attention it deserved until I stumbled across a photo of country singer/songwriter Kacey Musgraves with her horse Mismo. The name Delta Grace immediately sprung to mind and I knew I had my female farrier. I just needed a rugged family man to round out my story…and like a sign from above, singer Luke Bryant began playing on the radio. The man epitomizes family and I had all the inspiration I needed to write WRANGLING CUPID’S COWBOY. While this is by far my most heart wrenching story to date, it was one of my favorites to write. I hope you enjoy reading it.

FALLING HEAD OVER BOOTS…

Farrier Delta Grace has a strict rule about not getting involved with clients. Rugged ranch owner Garrett Slade is exactly why. The attraction between them is instant. He’s also her biggest client and the epitome of complicated. A widowed father of two, he’s moved back to Saddle Ridge, Montana, for a fresh start.

Despite her better judgment, Delta can’t stay away from Garrett or his kids. And it’s not long before her heart melts completely, along with her rules. However, when life deals Delta a devastating blow, she needs to distance herself from Garrett—their family has already experienced too much heartache. All is not lost, though, because with Valentine’s Day around the corner, love may actually conquer all!

Want to win a copy of WRANGLING CUPID’S COWBOY?

Tell me what fascinates you most about ranch life in the comments section and one winner will be randomly chosen to receive a copy (your choice: digital or paperback).

*****

Amanda Renee was raised in the Northeast and now wriggles her toes in the warm coastal Carolina sands. Her career began when she was discovered through Harlequin’s So You Think You Can Write contest. When not creating stories about love and laughter, she enjoys the company of her schnoodle—Duffy—camping, playing guitar and piano, photography and anything involving animals. You can visit her at amandarenee.com.

The Indian Agent’s Wife

Regina Jennings

Secluded from civilization, grossly outnumbered by hostile neighbors, but expected to keep up the appearance of a proper Victorian household—that was the task of an Indian Agent’s wife.

While Mrs. Daniel (Ida) Dyer’s white “verandahed” house was charming, just past her lawn was open prairie with hundreds of white tepees. In her book Picturesque Cheyenne and Arrapahoe Army Life before the Opening of Oklahoma, Mrs. Dyer notes that the village consisted of many noted warriors—warriors that were discontent with reservation life and not very fond of her husband. Also surrounding the agency town of Darlington were thousands of bleached and rotting bones that had accumulated over the years when the Indians tore apart their weekly beef rations. Not what the granddaughter of a U.S. Representative and Lieutenant Governor of Illinois was expecting out of married life, but Ida Dyer was made of stern stuff.

Even though Darlington in the 1880s included a hotel, a commissary, a mission school and a newspaper office, its population was limited to white people who had government permission to live there. Even visitors were sent away unless they had authorization. Mrs. Dyer and the agency employees did have a social life consisting of occasional parties and gatherings with the officers’ families from nearby Fort Reno, but entertainment came second to survival. While the wives of the officers at the fort could count on military protection, the agent’s wife was to offer a level of hospitality to the Indians that often left her vulnerable.

In one instance (which is included in my latest book Holding the Fort), an outlaw band of Cheyenne warriors took up arms. The agency employees and missionaries left Darlington and raced to the fort, but Ida remained at her husband’s side as he worked to get the proper reports completed before abandoning his post. Daylight disappeared and with it their hopes for safe passage to Fort Reno. The streets belonged to the Cheyenne, but the Dyer’s trusted Arapaho friends convinced the rebels that the Dyers had already fled. Understaffed and hopelessly outnumbered, the troopers at Fort Reno didn’t dare leave the fort to attempt a rescue. That left the Dyers as prisoners in their own home for two weeks, crawling past windows and unable to even light a fire for fear of being discovered.

But despite her fear, Ida found much to admire about the people she and her husband were serving. Thanks to her eye for detail and her amusing anecdotes, we can see her love for the Cheyenne and Arapaho people and her concern over the difficulties being forced upon them. Unfortunately, her husband’s ineptitude led to a short tenure as the agent in Darlington. Years later, when he read her published account of their experiences, he gathered every copy of the books he could acquire, burned them, and then divorced Ida. Thankfully, a few copies survived.

While Agent Dyer didn’t appreciate Ida’s recollections, we certainly can. Thanks to Ida Dyer’s firsthand account, we get to meet many women of the west who would’ve otherwise gone unsung.

Leave a comment to get your name in a drawing for Holding the Fort, Regina’s new release.

Award-winning author Regina Jennings is a homeschooling mother of four from Oklahoma. She enjoys watching musicals with her kids, traveling with her husband and reading by herself. Regina has worked at the Mustang News and First Baptist Church of Mustang, along with time at the Oklahoma National Stockyards and various livestock shows. Her latest release, Holding the Fort is the first book of the Fort Reno Series.

She loves to hear from readers at her website – http://www.reginajennings.com and on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest.

Holding the Fort

Fort Reno Series Book #1

Jennings Winningly Combines Humor, History, and Romance

Louisa Bell never wanted to be a dance-hall singer, but dire circumstances force her hand. With a little help from her brother in the cavalry, she’s able to make ends meet, but lately he’s run afoul of his commanding officer, so she undertakes a visit to straighten him out. 

Major Daniel Adams has his hands full at Fort Reno. He can barely control his rowdy troops, much less his two adolescent daughters. If Daniel doesn’t find someone respectable to guide his children, his mother-in-law insists she’ll take them.

When Louisa arrives with some reading materials, she’s mistaken for the governess who never appeared. Major Adams is skeptical. She bears little resemblance to his idea of a governess–they’re not supposed to be so blamed pretty–but he’s left without recourse. His mother-in-law must be satisfied, which leaves him turning a blind eye to his unconventional governess’s methods. Louisa’s never faced so important a performance. Can she keep her act together long enough?

Petticoats & Pistols © 2015