Category: Drawing

Old Hints and a New Release

 

In May my new book “Out of a Texas Night” was released.  I was so excited, and didn’t think things could get any better, but they have!  

I’m so thrilled to tell you all that the first book in the Kasota Spring series The Troubled Texan is on BookBub in the Romantic Suspense category today for a fantastic price of 99 cents.  Below is a link, so you can go directly to the website and purchase your copy from your favorite book provider.  If you haven’t checked BookBub out, please do so because they provide daily releases for special pricing, including free books, in almost every genera.

In my May blog, I gave you an insight into how this particular series came about. One of the things I mentioned is that in all three of the Kasota Springs stories I always use a family recipe for one of my characters, particularly Lola Ruth Hicks, who is the cook and the cement that holds the Jacks Bluff Ranch together. I then give the complete recipe, plus a little bit of my family history behind it at the back of the book.

In cleaning out some of my family “stuff”, I found a bicentennial cookbook from the town I lived in when I was born.  The Methodist Cooks Celebrate covers from 1784 to 1984.  I was amazed and enthralled with the book, especially the gems from way-back-yonder; so, I decided to share some interesting ones that are still applicable almost a century and a half later.

Measuring Ingredients 

She guessed the pepper; the soup was too hot,   

She guessed the water, it dried in the pot.

She guessed the salt and what do you think?

   For the rest of the day we did nothing but drink.

She guessed the sugar, the sauce was to sweet,

   And by her guessing, she spoiled the meat.

What of the moral, ‘tis easy to see,

    A good cook measures most carefully.

 

    There is no indigestion worse than that of trying to eat your own words.
    Those who think it permissible to tell ‘white lies’ soon go ‘colorblind’.

Advice to the Housewife

Well mix and bake the dainty cake,And beat the frosting light;

The sweetest plan to please a man is through his appetite.

 

A Couple of Cooking Tips:

    • To remedy greasy gravy, add a small amount of baking soda.

      

      Keep tomatoes in storage with stems pointed downward and they will retain their freshness longer.
      If you wrap each egg in aluminum foil before boiling it, the shell won’t crack when it’s boiling.
    Before measuring honey or syrup, oil the cup with cooking oil and rinse in hot water.

Household Tips:

    Tight screws:  Loosen a screw by putting a couple of drops of peroxide on it and letting it soak in.
    Buttons:  Coat the center of buttons with clear nail polish and they’ll stay on longer.
    Stubborn locks:  Dip key into machine oil or graphite to loosen up a lock.

 This is probably my favorite:

Let none escape, but try them all,

To boil or fry or bake.

We’ll warrant they are just as good

As Mother used to make!

 

Do you love old cookbooks?  If so, do you use many of the recipes?

To two lucky winners who leave a comment, I will give away an eBook of Out of a Texas Night.

   BOOKBUB Link 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updated: August 13, 2018 — 7:14 pm

Laura Drake Has a Winner!

 

Deepest thanks, Miss Laura, for entertaining us this weekend!

My biggest regret is not having enough time to read.

Sooooo, it’s time for the drawing……………….

Winner gets both of these print books and that winner is…….

ELLIE

Woo-Hoo! I’m tickled pink for you, Ellie. Miss Laura will contact you.

                                                   

 

Updated: August 5, 2018 — 10:26 am

Linda Broday Has Winners!

Thank you all for coming Tuesday to talk about ranch names. I loved it!

Because I loved it so much, I’m adding another book to the drawing.

So………Here you go………..

CHRISTI LUCAS

SALLY SCHMIDT

Congratulations, ladies! I’ll contact you for your preference of print or ebook.

Or you can email me at linda (at) lindabroday (dot) com.

 

Updated: August 4, 2018 — 10:09 am

When Good People Make Bad Mistakes by Laura Drake

 

‘Ordinary women at the edge of extraordinary change’

Appreciate your mistakes for what they are: precious life lessons that can only be learned the hard way. Unless it’s a fatal mistake, which, at least, others can learn from.

– Al Franken

I’m fascinated by what makes good people make horrible decisions. I mean, we’re all doing the best we can, given what we know at the time, right? I explore this theme in a lot of my books, but never more than in my December release, The Last True Cowboy.

Carly Beauchamp has loved cowboy Austin Davis since first grade. Ask anyone in their dusty, backwater New Mexico town of Unforgiven, and they’ll say, “Carly and Austin” the way some say, “big trucks and country boys.” But after years of waiting for a wedding ring, Carly’s done with being a rodeo widow. She dumps Austin (again), but after a month she’s a pressure cooker, ready to blow. She heads to Albuquerque, where she’s not half of the C&A franchise. No heartbroken, “poor Carly.” Just an anonymous chick in a generic country bar. There she meets a man with ice blue eyes in biker leathers. They have nothing in common—except heartbreak. They pour out their pain while pouring the booze.

Horror hits when Carly wakes alone, but vaguely remembers she didn’t go to sleep that way. She calls around, to find that her mystery man never existed. He lied. About his name, his job . . . everything. She takes a morning after pill and goes home, determined to put this huge mistake in the rear view mirror. And she manages—more or less—until the doctor confirms her pregnancy.

Austin never meant to put his career on the circuit before Carly. She’s always been his future, his one and only. But now that she’s moved on, he’s beginning to see where he went wrong, and he’ll do anything to win her back. The only thing is, Carly’s suddenly acting differently, and she’s definitely hiding a secret—one that will test the depth of their love and open up a whole new world of possibilities.

So what do you think, P&P readers? Have you ever made a mistake that seemed like a good idea at the time?

Laura is away print copies of Nothing Sweeter and Sweet on You to one lucky winner picked at random from those who leave a comment.

Buy Laura Drake’s books here. 

Heart and soul. Cowboys and rodeos. Laura Drake has the amazing ability to give you all of it and leave you wanting more at the end.” Carolyn Brown, NY Times bestselling author

“Brilliant writing, just brilliant”–NYT bestselling author, Lori Wilde

 

 

Updated: July 31, 2018 — 10:26 am

Sometimes We Eat Giant Pickles at the Movies

When I talked to a dear friend, Jennifer Jacobson, about writing a blog on misconceptions Easterners hold about Westerners, she recommended the children’s book Gila Monsters Meet You at the Airport by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat and Byron Barton. The book’s young hero laments about what he’ll find when he moves out West. Not only did I get a good laugh, but the book fit perfectly with many stories friends shared on the subject. As Sharmat and Barton’s hero says at the end, “Back East they don’t know much about us Westerners.” Because of this fact, getting regional dialect/phrases, career details and settings that add richness to a story can be harder than readers realize because many industry professional are Easterners.

 One thing the hero in Gila Monsters Meet You at the Airport claims at the beginning is, “…there’s cactus everywhere you look.” I chuckled because apparently, we have a cacti cover problem on Texas romance novels. When I asked author friends and readers on Facebook what Eastern folks get wrong about the west, I received a few cactus stories. Fact is, we don’t see many cacti in east or central Texas, but often there they’re on covers of novels set there. Other authors found saguaros on covers for west Texas novels though they don’t grow in Texas.

Often authors must explain regional phrases or words to editors. For example, what some call a dish towel, others call a cup towel. A pumpjack or nodding donkey is part of an oil well. It was suggested she say pumping jack. Ah, not only no, but hell no. As the author who shared the story said, she’d be “laughed out of west Texas if she’d used that term.” Another thing people don’t understand is y’all isn’t singular. A live oak is a specific type of tree, not a tree that’s actually alive. Texas barns are most likely weathered and red, not the giant red barns seen in the East and Midwest.

Another big issue was horses. One friend’s pet peeve was when authors put a hero on a “well-behaved” stallion. First, stallions are rarely “well-behaved,” and second, stallions often can’t be near other horses. Another author friend said she spotted a cover where the male model had a bridle thrown over his shoulder… upside down! According to her, “No one who has been within 20 feet of a horse would carry a bridle that way.” 

A friend and amazing artist, Jane Monsson also said her pet peeve is when authors get horse details wrong. From her art, it’s apparent she loves horses and knows a lot about them. I admit, I’ve worried about messing up with horse anatomy or gear. After all, I write western romance. There’s going to be horses in my stories and I need to get it right. While I know which end of a horse is which, I’ve never owned one and am nowhere near an expert.

How do I get details right enough so as not to offend experts like Jane? Edgar R. “Frosty” Potter’s cool book Cowboy Slang. The book contains an illustration “Parts of a Horse” and “Parts of a Horse Skeleton.” (I haven’t needed the later, but one never knows!However, I’ve frequently referred to the section “Colors of Horses.” This book of one hundred twenty-three pages is a treasure, containing great western sayings, info on cattle brands, barbed wire, cattle ear crop types, and how cowboys use a bandana! For horse gear, I refer to the illustrated horse gear section of a volunteer booklet from Equest Therapeutic Horsemanship Program. 

The other way I check facts or do research for my stories is by finding an expert. But that’s a blog for another day.

Now it’s your turn. Share with me what your pet peeve that people get wrong about the west or us Westerners and be entered to win a copy of To Catch a Texas Cowboy and the Book Club wine glass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updated: July 31, 2018 — 8:18 pm

Tina Radcliffe Has Winners!

 

YAY! What fun talking about the old cowboy movies! I loved it!

The drawing is a bit late but I’ve been out gallivanting around. Sorry.

Anyhow, it’s time to get this done……………..

Winners of Falling For the Cowgirl (either print or ebook) are……

EMMA

CHARLENE WHITEHOUSE

Yippee! Congratulations, ladies! Miss Tina will contact you so keep watching for her email.

 

Updated: July 23, 2018 — 1:29 pm
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