WHAT A GREAT STORY! by CHERYL PIERSON

Well, summer’s over, and fall is “on the way”! I wish I could say I had an actual “beach read” but we haven’t taken a vacation in years, and probably won’t in the foreseeable future now that we have our two furbabies. So we have to do little fun things locally, and try to relax at home—which is sometimes hard to do. But one way I can always escape is with a good book—and I have read (and re-read) some wonderful ones this summer.

Have you ever read a book that you didn’t want to finish because it was so good you didn’t want the story to end? I remember when I read Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series—that was how I felt. A lot of people don’t like lengthy books, but I love them—the more intricate and in-depth the characters and plotlines are, the more I enjoy them I was so glad to have “the next one” to go to in that series, and though there were some I liked better than others, I thought they were all well-written and entertaining!

 

I read a book this summer called The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson that was in this category. I could not put it down, but I didn’t want it to be over! Linda Broday had recommended it and I went right over and bought it from Amazon. I rarely do that, but something about the way Linda talked about that book made me want to read it, and put it right at the top of my TBR pile! I was NOT disappointed. Here’s the blurb:

The hardscrabble folks of Troublesome Creek have to scrap for everything?everything except books, that is. Thanks to Roosevelt’s Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project, Troublesome’s got its very own traveling librarian, Cussy Mary Carter. Cussy’s not only a book woman, however, she’s also the last of her kind, her skin a shade of blue unlike most anyone else. Not everyone is keen on Cussy’s family or the Library Project, and a Blue is often blamed for any whiff of trouble.

If Cussy wants to bring the joy of books to the hill folks, she’s going to have to confront prejudice as old as the Appalachias and suspicion as deep as the holler.

Inspired by the true blue-skinned people of Kentucky and the brave and dedicated Kentucky Pack Horse library service of the 1930s, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a story of raw courage, fierce strength, and one woman’s belief that books can carry us anywhere?even back home.

https://tinyurl.com/y35ms65w

I don’t want to give any spoilers, but this is one book you will remember long after you reach the end. I read a ton of books every year, and this is going on my “keeper” shelf, along with the NEXT book I bought by the same author called GodPretty in the Tobacco Field. Oh, goodness. I then had to just go to Amazon and order the rest of her books. These may ALL be keepers!

I read one of Kat Martin’s older books, Natchez Flame—that one had my heart pounding and wondering how in the world she was going to let Priscilla and Brendan have their happy-ever-after that they so richly deserved! Sigh…Take a look…

A woman of courage and honor. She sold everything she owned to go west and marry a powerful land baron she’d never seen. But Priscilla Wills hadn’t counted on the gunfight—or the gun—fighter—who would change her life: the tall, broad-shouldered man who killed her guardian in self-defense. Reluctantly he agreed to take her through the dangerous Texas back country to her fiancé’s ranch. She hadn’t planned on a journey that would take her into a stranger’s soul as he delivered her into another man’s waiting arms.

A man who lived by the gun. He was an outlaw—yet Brendan Trask unleashed in the prim and proper Priscilla a fiery passion that matched his own. But a man running for his life couldn’t afford a woman who hungered for the security that only her wealthy fiancé could provide.

What’s on the agenda for the next “wonderful read”? I’ve got two I want to re-read—Nobody’s Darling, by Teresa Medeiros, one of my very favorite authors ever—and Star Keeper by Patricia Potter, who is also a dear favorite, as well. I’ve read both of these in the past but it’s been a while and they need to be re-read! LOL Nobody’s Darling is a western historical romance, and Star Keeper takes place during the War of Independence, which is such an interesting time period, as well!

Also waiting for me are Airs Above the Ground by Mary Stewart—it’s been a long time since I read any of her work, and it’s always so wonderful. And last but not least, These Is My Words: The Diary of Sarah Agnes Prine, 1881-1901 by Nancy E. Turner.

And…of course, the other books I ordered by Kim Michele Richardson that will be here any day now! I’ve got my reading cut out for me, but I’m looking forward to every single one of these stories. Have you read any wonderful books lately that you’d want to share with us? I’m always on the lookout for “the next good read” and love to talk books! How about you?

Cheryl Pierson
A native Oklahoman, I've been influenced by the west all my life. I love to write short stories and novels in the historical western and western romance genres, as well as contemporary romantic suspense! Check my Amazon author page to see my work: http://www.amazon.com/author/cherylpierson
I live in Oklahoma City with my husband of 40 years. I love to hear from readers and other authors--you can contact me here: fabkat_edit@yahoo.com
Follow me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cheryl.pierson.92
http://petticoatsandpistols.com/sweepstakesrules

42 Comments

  1. Good morning Cheryl. I’ve recently have been pulled to books that pull me and seem more intense than the average fiction romance. After reading several of these type book I keep craving them. I too loved The Book Woman Of Troublesome Creek, It was definitely one of those special genre books:
    My review: Sometimes a book comes into your life and after finishing it, all you can do is thank the Dear Lord for the hand that crafted it and the legacy it leaves.
    I’m forever blessed I read this book.
    My heart will always be grateful for Cussy Mary ‘s story and reaffirms my love of books and why I read.
    Kim Michele Richardson truly captured the Blue-skinned people of Kentucky and the discrimination they faced, just because they were different and unique. Truly heartfelt as well as, heartbreaking.

    I also praise the remarkable Book Women who would not let those who were misfortunate, miss out on the world of books. The dangerous mountain roads and untraveled passages they foraged to deliver books to those who didn’t even have paying jobs or near enough for their families.
    I highly praise this book and the author who penned it!

    My favorite quote from from this phenomenal book!
    “My woman always said God saved the best color for his home”
    He pointed a finger up to a patch of blue sky parting the gray clouds.
    “I guess He must’ve had himself a little left over.”

    The best book I’ve ever read is Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens: my review:
    This book is silver screen worthy!!!
    What an amazing gift Ms. Delia Owens has given humanity.
    A powerful book laced with heartache, tough times, and a willingness to survive & conquer life to the fullest.
    I will forever be thankful I read this masterful novel.
    It will remain in my heart and very soul for all time.
    Kya weaved herself into my heart and will forever remain, especially when fireflies light the night.

    Right now I’m reading a very good book that I think falls into the same genre as Where The Crawdads Sing And Book Woman Of Troublesome Creek.
    It’s called Moon Water by Pam Webber. I highly recommend it.
    Thanks for the great blog.

    1. Tonya, we share a love for the written word and stories so well-crafted and finely honed that they’re forever a part of us. I thank you for telling me about Crawdads. That one and Book Woman will stay in my heart forever. Both spoke to me in a way few others have. I hope Moon Water delivers for you. You’ll have to let me know.

    2. Hi Tonya! So glad you enjoyed it, and thanks so much for posting your reviews! I have not read Where the Crawdads Sing or Moon Water, so those are going on my list too. Thanks so much for mentioning them!

  2. I’m the same way as you are. My vacations are done through reading. We just haven’t been able to afford a vacation in a very long time. There are some really good books that make you feel like you’ve just been on a great vacation.

    1. Yes, Janine, reading is such a gift, isn’t it? When I hear someone say “I don’t like to read.” I feel a stab of pity for them! To think of all they have missed and are missing by not picking up a book and learning to enjoy reading! You can go anywhere in the world–in the universe, and time travel forward or backward as well. One thing it’s taught me is this–I love to read and write about the old west but I would not have liked living there in actuality. LOL Thanks for stopping by!

      1. I feel the same way about people who don’t read. My husband is one of them. I haven’t seen him pick up a book (except for his bible) since I have known him. I do feel bad for all he misses out on.

        1. Oh wow, Janine. My hubby used to read all the time, but then he went through a “phase” where he didn’t pick up one thing to read–wasn’t interested in anything reading-wise. I was worried. He got cataract surgery and that was not the “cure-all” he’d hoped for, but made reading easier, but still he has to wear reading glasses. He doesn’t read like he used to anymore, but he does read once in a while. I think he got out of the habit and just lost interest for the most part. I can’t imagine not having a book I’m reading–I usually have 2-3 going at once. LOL

  3. Janine I agree, books can take you everywhere, even if you stay at home, after a great book we feel like we just were on a grand vacation & journey.

    1. And you think about it for days, even years–and luckily, you have the book right there to read again if you choose to and revisit those characters and places again!

  4. Avatar

    Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is on my list of books I want to read. I lived in Kentucky as a child so this book is calling me although I lived in Western Kentucky but I did live in a Tennessee hollar as a young adult and came across families that remind me of what I picturing the families are like in BWTC.

    I agree with Tonya Lucas, Where the Crawdad’s Sing is one of those books that spoke to my soul and it is a book that all people should read. As bad of a disconnect as American’s are having these days and the way children are being raised with the feeling they are entitled to be given so much, I wish Where the Crawdad’s Sing was on a required reading list in our school system.

    Blue by Danielle Steel is another book that pulled me in and took ahold of my heart. It is about an orphan and a widow, it’s a very gripping story that will have you rooting for Blue to have a very happy ever after.

    Your list of reads sounds awesome! Thanks for sharing.

    1. Stephanie- oh yes Blue was a great book.
      Another book we all loved. Linda, Glenda, you & I was by Marcy McKay- Pennies in Burger Heaven. I’ll never look at homeless people the same way again.

    2. Stephanie, I feel the same way about Crawdads. That, too, deeply spoke to me and I agree that it should be required reading in school. Kids need to see how the less fortunate had to live. They need to see history as something more than dates and stuffy figures to memorize. Give Book Woman a try and you’ll see what Cheryl and I are talking about.

    3. Stephanie, we moved to West Virginia when I was 17 and I lived there for 10 years–very much like Kentucky, with it being a neighboring state and both so heavily into coal mining. My husband is from WV and lived “up the hollar”–I could relate to Book Woman so much–it was familiar to me to read the dialogue and descriptions, etc. I used to read Danielle Steele like there was no tomorrow. I have not read Blue, so that will be one I can add to my list. I always enjoyed her stories!

  5. We don’t do vacations anymore either. I have had trouble this summer finding that one book that really got to me. Its just me I guess I am in a reading slump.

    1. Quilt Lady, I get that way sometimes, too. Book Woman really was one that gripped me–so much, in fact, that I bought a copy for my sister who doesn’t read a lot of fiction but I told her she needed to read that one, and sent it to her, and she did! She loved it too, and loaned it to a friend, and her daughter wants to read it when her friend is done. That’s how wonderful it is. LOL I bought GodPretty in the Tobacco Field and loved it just as much–it’s hard to say which was my favorite–because they are both wonderful. I hope you find a book in these suggestions everyone’s giving to get you out of the slump and back into your reading again!

  6. Books are the best way to relax. I really like Kat Martin. I am going to get that one.

    1. Debra, it’s an older one of Kat’s but it’s very entertaining, and I believe you can order it from Amazon.

  7. Books keep me sane, especially this summer. My oldest niece was married in August and it seemed everything was centred around the wedding. But I did get to read lots of good books. I loved The Book Women of Troublesome Creek. It was an amazing story and I learned a lot about a condition that I found out one of my cousin’s had when she was pregnant.. Wow. I could not put this book down and I hope to read more from this author. She was a great new find for me.

    1. Kathleen, I agree–if we didn’t have books we probably would all be quite barmy by now! LOL Congratulations to your niece! But I’m sure the wedding took center stage for many weeks–that’s a lot of work! Yes, Book Woman was a new-to-me author that I absolutely love, and must thank Linda Broday again for recommending that book so highly. It truly was awesome. I hope you get GodPretty in the Tobacco Field, too. I’ve started Liar’s Bench but haven’t gotten very far yet on it.

  8. Good morning, Cheryl….I’m happy you took my recommendation about Book Woman and latched on to Kim Michele Richardson’s books. She’s an outstanding writer. Her stories grip your heart and won’t let go. Book Woman rates right up there with To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s that good and I don’t say that lightly. It truly ranks in the top 5 books that I’ve ever read. It could be that it’s because I could relate so fully with her and that lifestyle and the fact my dad and his dad plied the trade of bootlegger. But, this book had everything I crave–an unforgettable story, history, books, and a little romance. So did WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING. Oh man! Now I’m on the hunt for more like them. Stay tuned…..

    1. Hi Linda! See what you started by recommending Book Woman? You should get a “finder’s fee” or something! LOL I have always said To Kill A Mockingbird was my favorite book ever, but when I read Book Woman I thought of TKAM and how similar the writing was. It is wonderful and I’m so thankful you recommended it. I will be reading Where the Crawdads Sing too–looks like you are not alone in loving that one, as well!

  9. I’ve loved to read since I was very young, before I could read for myself, actually, as I remember many times getting my parents to read to me!! There are some authors that, as soon as they have a new book out, I’m getting it!! There are many books that I’ve read that I didn’t want to put down. One I’ve read two or three times that I still don”t want to put down is This Present Darkness. Wonderful book!!

    1. Is This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti? I remember my sister reading his books, but I’ve never given them a try. Maybe I need to now!

      1. Yes, it is!! I loved it!! It took me awhile to get into the book, cause it’s very different from what I usually read. However, once I really got into it, I didn’t want to put it down!! I stayed up late that night reading, read it all the next day, and finished it the next!! I only put it down to eat and go to church, since I started it on Friday night right after I bought it, and finished it Sunday afternoon.

    2. OH, Frank Peretti! I love his books! Did you know he also had books for young adults? I bought them for my kids when they were that age and we were still reading together at night–we read together for the longest time–great bonding time and a chance to talk about what we were reading. I’m so glad you mentioned him and that book, because I had forgotten about it and he is a fascinating storyteller!

      1. I’ve read most of his books. I like the way he writes, but This Present Darkness is still my favorite!

  10. My two favorite reads this summer were A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and The Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay Adams.

    My book club read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and it was the first time I’ve read it. It started out slow, but eventually I was hooked. I’m convinced that everyone could find a story in this to relate to. I attended a distant family reunion this summer and was gifted some books that belonged to a great aunt I only met once, but corresponded with. It included her copy of this book–right before it was picked by my book club. The timing was perfect.

    I won an ARC copy of The Bromance Book Club and have had so much fun with it. My husband actually read it before me, and declared that all married people should have to read this book. It was lighthearted in parts, but dealt with some serious issues about communication, too. Currently, my mom has my copy and I think I’ve got a few friends waiting to borrow it, too.

    1. Carrie, I read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn many years ago–I didn’t “get it” –I was too young. I need to re-read it, because I have thought about it off and on since then. I knew I “didn’t get it” at the time but there was something that spoke to me in that story nonetheless. So it’s time to find it again and re-read it. I have not read The Bromance Book Club but it sounds great–that title! Will look that one up, too!

  11. I’m reading Before and After (not yet released) which is a companion book to Lisa Wingate’s Before We Were Yours. It will be available in October.

    1. Oh, Denise, I’m so glad you mentioned Before We Were Yours. I saw that advertised on Amazon and was going to get it but I was honestly afraid of it. I wasn’t sure how sad it was and boy, the older I get the harder it is for me to read things that are heartbreakingly sad. I thought it looked really interesting. I might get it anyhow and take my chances.

      1. It’s based on a true story, and if you’re like me, you will cry. But, it’s a beautiful story, and there is a heartwarming ending.

        1. I’m going to get it. I’ve seen it advertised, and have been wanting to read it. I don’t mind crying (I did a lot of that in Book Woman) but I just want to know there’s hope at the end! LOL

  12. Cheryl, I also enjoyed The Bookwoman of Troublesome Creek. Tomorrow I’ll begin reading The Oracle: The Jubilean Mysteries Unveiled by Jonathan Cahn.

    1. That sounds interesting, Caryl! I’m going to look that up on Amazon and see about it. Yes, The Book Woman was just so wonderful, wasn’t it? I absolutely loved that story.

  13. Hi, I really loved reading Forgiveness Road by Mandy Mikulencak, I did not want this book to end, to me it needs a sequel , I would love to read more of it, it seems like it needs to continue. I also loved reading Masquerade Marriage by Anne Greene, and I also enjoyed reading Silent Harmony by Caryl McAdoo, it is also a very good book. Thank you for sharing with us the books that you have read, they all sound like very good books.

    1. Alicia, those all sound like they’d be good. I read so much for my job, and these are just a few of the ones I’ve read for pleasure–I wish I had room to just list all of the really great ones I’ve read this summer and the ones I want to go back and re-read. I got The Girls of Glass Ferry in the mail today, another book by Kim M. Richardson, so I am going to have my reading cut out for me, and I’m thrilled. LOL

  14. I learn so much from participating in this blog. Thank you all for enlightening my world with all your comments, recommendations, and reviews. I am blessed!

    1. Kathy, we are so glad to have our followers here at P&P and you just don’t know what it means to us to have y’all come by and read and comment. I love blogs like this one where we learn things and have interaction with one another and are able to SHARE all kinds of –not just “information” but personal tidbits and likes/dislikes and get to know everyone as individuals. It means a lot to us, so we feel blessed, too!

  15. Good morning, this is a wonderful post. I have just finished: by Mary Connealy Bk 1 The Accidental Guardian and Bk 2 The Reluctant Warrior and ready to start Bk 3 The Unexpected Champion. Those first two books are so fantastic. I felt like I was not only in the area and time but a part of the lives and happenings with the characters. I didnt want to put these books down and make dinner or go to bed. I felt they were that great.

    1. Mary’s book are always just excellent and these are some I don’t have yet. So I’m sure glad you mentioned them! Amazon is going to love me…I think they know me by my first name over there! LOL Thanks so much for stopping by, Lori!

  16. I read very little since last April. We were on the road for 2 1/2 months and I thought I would get so much reading done. I didn’t even make it through a reread of Linda Broday’s THE OUTLAWS MAIL ORDER BRIDE so I could do a review. I still am only about 1/3 of the way through. I brought her newest book but haven’t even been able to look at it. Since getting home, I have been busy trying to catch up with everything and making some needed doctor’s appointments. I am jealous of your reading list. I have not read Richardson, but the others you mentioned are all favorites. I have a couple of those books on my shelves waiting to be read. I want to ignore what needs to be done and just sit and read. My vision is giving me trouble, so reading has really slowed down. It is so frustrating.
    I am familiar with the Kentucky Pack Horse librarians. We aren’t far from the Kentucky border and it was a topic of discussion when I worked at a local county library. I had not heard of the blue people of the area and looked it up. Very interesting. The recessive gene manifested itself in the 1970’s, but the young man actually grew out of it. It is interesting what traits will come out when people live in a remote, isolated area.

    1. Patricia, I’m sorry to hear your eyes are giving you trouble. I have that problem sometimes, too, if I strain them by looking at the computer too much or just reading too much! I sure hope things improve for you in a hurry. It will take me a long time to get through all these books that have been mentioned here on the blog. I’m making a list and will order these books “along the way” as I finish some of the others. Anymore, it seems I have to keep a list–I won’t remember things otherwise, but I’m a “lister” anyhow, so it’s all good. LOL There was a special on PBS several years ago about the blue people. I think it was on PBS–can’t remember now. But it was really good. Well, and you can’t ever go wrong with Linda’s books, so you know you have something to look forward to reading when your eyes–and schedule–will permit! And praying that is very soon. Always so good to hear from you, my friend!

Comments are closed.