How am I? Same trailer, different park.

If you’ve read my books, you know I love pairing a cowboy with a city girl. My characters usually wonder how they can be attracted to someone who fails to hit even one item on their this-is-what-I’m-looking-for-in-a-potential-date list, and this creates great conflict. But another reason I love throwing cowboys and city women together is it creates great dialogue and can even increase sexual tension.

Here are some sayings that have great dialogue potential. I’ve tweaked some a little the way I would if I used them in dialogue. ?
• Woman, you’re as friendly as a fire ant.
• Darlin’, I’m so country I think a seven-course meal is a possum and a six pack. (I can see my hero saying this one with a wry grin.)
• If a trip around the world cost a dollar, I couldn’t get to the Oklahoma state line.
• You look like you were sent for and couldn’t go. (Can’t you see the sparks flying if my cowboy hero said this to a heroine?!)
• You’re so skinny you have to stand twice to make a shadow. (More sparks flying, I think as my heroine wonders if this is a compliment or a diss.)
• You look like the cheese fell off your cracker.
• Honey, you make a hornet look cuddly.
• Woman, you talk any faster and you’ll catch up to yesterday.
• You look like you’ve been rode hard and put away wet. Or, it’s twin, you look like you’ve been chewed up, spit out, and stepped on. (This one has potential for a tender moment, as the hero asks her what on earth happened. When she asks why he thinks something is wrong, he uses a soft husky voice and says, “Sweetheart, you look like you’ve been chewed up, spit out, and stepped on.” Of course, what he says shatters her control. She confides in him. He understands and consoles her. Bond forms, and there you go, sexual tension.)
• Woman, you could talk the legs off a chair.
• Are you two sandwiches short of a picnic?
• Don’t dig up more snakes than you can kill. (Can’t you imagine a city girl trying to understand what the hero means by this one and him trying to explain it?)
• Don’t write a check your ass can’t cash.
• He’s all hat, no cattle.
• You can put your boots in the oven, but that don’t make ‘em biscuits.
• Same trailer, different park. (In response to being asked how you’re doing.)
• Dang, if you aren’t double-backboned (I can see my hero saying this to a heroine when he’s impressed with her strength of will or character. Of course, she won’t quite get the compliment, and when he explains it, she’ll just melt all over his boots.)
• Woman, you’d charge hell with a bucket of ice water.

Not only can a western saying add color and realism to a story, it can add humor, reveal character or even create sexual tension. But best of all, it’s fun as all get out to write.

Now mosey on over to leave a comment about one of the sayings above or your own personal favorite and be entered for a chance to win the snack set and a copy of To Catch A Texas Cowboy featuring AJ, a Texas Aggie cowboy and New York City girl Grace Henry.

Julie Benson
Julie Benson has written five novels for Harlequin American, and her Wishing, Texas series is available from Tule Publishing. Now that her three sons have left the nest in Dallas, when she isn't writing, Julie spends her time working on home improvement projects, rescuing dogs, and visiting Texas wineries with her husband. Visit her at www.juliebenson.net.
Updated: January 30, 2018 — 8:42 pm

43 Comments

  1. I like “He’s all hat, no cattle.” It is a good way to describe someone who puts forth an image they don’t or can’t live up to. Basically they are phonies pretending to be something they aren’t.
    I enjoy stories when the hero and heroine are opposites. It opens things to being misinterpreted or not understood at all. They have to work that much harder for their HEA.

    1. Patricia, thanks for stopping by. I love when the h/h are opposites too. It leads itself to so many misunderstandings, conflict, and humor!

  2. My favorite, ” You can put your boots in the oven, but that don’t make ’em biscuits.” What a line! Thank you for sharing your great post!

    1. Melanie, that one came from a friend, Kim Hampton and I loved it the moment I read it. I’m definitely going to use that one in a book!

  3. Darlin’, you are one long, tall drink of water.
    Sweetheart, you are a sight for sore eyes.

    Enjoyed your post with all the country lingo.

    1. Jerri, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. It was a lot of fun to write. It also got my creative juices flowing!

  4. I like the one about boots in the oven not being biscuits. I could hear that one in mind being said.

    1. Debra, that one is going in a book for sure! Thanks for stopping by this morning.

    2. I can hear any one of my cowboys saying it, too. Thanks for stopping by Debra!

  5. Good morning everyone. I’m so glad you stopped by to chat with me! I’ll be popping in and out today. I substitute teach, and I am substituting today. A teacher fell walking her dogs and hit her head. She’s having a rough time of it, and I’m helping out by taking her class. Anyway, I wanted to let you know why it might take me a while to respond.

  6. I had to bookmark your post to come back to. I love these quotes. My favorites are “same trailer, different park”, “You look like the cheese fell off your cracker”, and “Are you two sandwiches short of a picnic”. My husband uses a similar phrase to “You look like you’ve been rode hard and put away wet”. Thanks for sharing and giving me a big smile this morning.

    1. Janine, I had a blast writing this post. My mind was spinning with all the dialogue these comments would create.im glad you enjoyed them too!

  7. Love, LOVE these, Julie! I’m starting a file . . .

    1. I’ve started a list, too, Pam. These and the others I found but didn’t use are too good to forget!

  8. I guess my favorite is Don’t write a check your ass can’t cash. There is one I use pretty often and its You’d make a rabit hug a hound.

    1. I love the rabbit hug a hound. I’m adding that one to my list. Thanks!

  9. How fun! I love a great western saying. Really adds color and fun to the read. My favorite of the ones you mentioned are: “You look like the cheese fell off your cracker” and “Honey, you make a hornet look cuddly.” Love those! Might have to steal (cough, cough) borrow those, Julie. 😉

  10. Love the post. I really liked “are you 2 sandwiches short of a picnic ? And ” honey, you make a hornet look cuddly”.
    Carol Luciano

    1. Carol, I’m definitely going to use those with a hero when the heroine gets under his skin.

  11. Hi Julie, those are really fun!! My favorites are ‘You’re so skinny you have to stand twice to make a shadow.’ and: ‘Woman, you could talk the legs off a chair.’

    1. Annette, I can’t wait to have a heroine who can talk people into things and have the hero use the chair comment with her. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

  12. Enjoyed your post. My favorite is ‘Woman, you could talk the legs off a chair.’I am looking forward to reading To Catch A Texas Cowboy. Thank you for the opportunity to win.Have a wonderful week.

    1. Emma, I’m glad you stopped by today. I hope you have a great week, too! It’s off to a fun start so far.

  13. Woman, you talk any faster and you’ll catch up to yesterday.

    This one doesn’t have to be between potential sweethearts. Now that my dad has moved back to the South, I think I talk to fast for him, plus he’s hard of hearing anyway. We Yankees do talk fast.

    1. Denise, I had been so focused on dialogue between the hero and heroine, I hadn’t thought about how other characters could say something like this too. Thanks for pointing it out.

  14. Interesting sayings. I use Not To Worry since it is translated from Yiddish.

    1. Annie, thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment.

  15. I love these. So funny. When I grew up I heard many different quotes from my parents and grandmother. One was A Blow is forgotten, A spoken word lingers on.

    1. Ellie, that’s a good one too. My dad used to say even a blind sow finds an acorn.

  16. A good livelihood is a cure for all ills. Your post today is delightful and special.

    1. First of all April, thanks for your kind words, and I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love your saying, too. My husband’s been out of work twice during our marriage, and it’s amazing how unemployment tarnishes every aspect of life, and how so many problems disappear when he found work.

  17. A fun post! “Your all hat and no cattle”, has been a favorite of mine since the first time I watched “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys”. Our daughters were in college at the time and new several students that the phrase described perfectly.

    1. Alice, it’s amazing how if someone described a cowboy as all hat and no cattle, I’d know everything I needed to about the man. Sounds like your daughters could tell a story or two about some of the students they knew.

  18. Same trailer, different park. Love todays post.

    1. Kim, thanks for the sweet comment. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for stopping by today.

  19. I am surprised I have only ever heard two of those sayings… interesting!

    1. Colleen, a bunch of them surprised me, too. Now I have a whole new arsenal. I can’t wait to use them in a story.

  20. Howdy Julie! Thank you for this fun post!

    1. Glad you enjoyed it and how’s to you, too!

      1. Caryl, that was supposed to be howdy to you, too. That’s what I get for typing on my phone.

  21. I really loved today’s post! It gave me big smiles. Thank you.

    Some I particularly like include…
    • If a trip around the world cost a dollar, I couldn’t get to the Oklahoma state line.
    • You look like the cheese fell off your cracker.
    • Honey, you make a hornet look cuddly.
    • Are you two sandwiches short of a picnic?
    • He’s all hat, no cattle.

    I agree that all-hat-no-cattle says a whole lot in just a few words. Thank you again! 🙂

Comments are closed.

Petticoats & Pistols © 2015