Twas the Day After Christmas…

Dear Santa,

What do you do the day after Christmas? Do you sleep in? Have breakfast in bed? Rejoice that your mission for the year is
over?

Or are you already planning for next year?

I hope you take a few days off and recharge those batteries. I hope that the pictures I’ve seen of tropical Santa in flowered shorts and a straw hat are real and you’re taking the missus on a much-deserved vacation.

When I was a teacher, the day after Christmas was one day closer to going back to work, so I would embrace the day, try to make it last as long as possible. But the days always slipped away and I found myself back at school. Now don’t get me wrong—I loved teaching, loved my kids—but teaching is exhausting and
sometimes my batteries didn’t get totally recharged, which is why I want you to take that vacation. The last thing this world needs is a burned-out Santa.

The day after Christmas represents such a shift. The holiday for which I’ve been preparing for months is over. Done. Gone for another twelve months.  If I feel a mixed sense of sadness and relief, I can only imagine what you feel after completing such a monumental task.

So, Santa, take care of yourself. We appreciate what you do, sharing the Love and Hope and Goodness that this season represents.

Blessings,

Jeannie

Jeannie Watt

Jeannie Watt lives off the grid in an historic cattle ranching area and loves all things western. When she’s not writing, Jeannie enjoys sewing, making mosaic mirrors, riding her horses and buying hay. Lots and lots of hay.


Updated: December 24, 2016 — 8:04 pm

7 Comments

  1. Very nicely said. I am a retired teacher as well and sometimes those batteries take longer to recharge.

  2. My husband has to go back to work today. So, today is a cleaning day for me. I put away the few Christmas decorations that I put out and clean the rest of the house.

  3. Before I retired, I worked in publishing on weekly deadlines so holidays always meant heightened work pressure of missing that one day while getting the same amount of work done–usually on beaucoup overtime–both the weeks before and after the holiday. All in addition to home holiday demands, of course. So I think I spent most holidays back then–especially Christmas and New Year’s–in somewhat of an extended and exhausted daze.

    I remember thinking slower drivers were that way probably because of age, while I now know retired people are out of the rat race and just aren’t pushing so hard for various deadlines, and can enjoy their time at their own pace.

    I also know from having lived in Scotland where Christmas is much less commercial and frenetic that the holiday “push” and demand is much more of an American thing. So… now living a less time-challenged (retired) and definitely a more simplified (a choice) lifestyle has meant the day-after Xmas letdown and exhaustion have just slipped away and are not missed.

  4. The day after Christmas is usually a quiet time in this household. My son-in-law and daughter both work in education and are glad for the break.

    The grandsons are content to play with their gifts(both got a Chromebook this year).

    I read,as always.

  5. Today is called Boxing Day in Canada and most of the Commonwealth countries. It’s a holiday and most people with be out braving all the Boxing Day sales.. But not this gal. She is going to relax and read…

  6. So many of us don’t take the time or get the time to recharge. Retirement won’t do it, many find themselves more busy. We are still in holiday mode, sort of, here. December has not been kind. Illness, too many events to plan and carry out, a death, starting to get her affairs settled, a previously planned trip to the beach with daughter and 5 year old granddaughter (a new job prevented her husband from coming), getting home Christmas Eve, and trying to clean a house which is a total disaster. We will celebrate Christmas with our children and their families either New Years weekend or Epiphany weekend, whichever works out best for everyone. I haven’t even wrapped presents. As a military family, we learned many years ago to celebrate when we can. We are celebrating a holiday or person, not a date. Retirement hasn’t changed that.

Comments are closed.

Petticoats & Pistols © 2015