Spicy Pumpkin Seed Brittle Recipe

WG Logo 2015-04

Hi! Winnie Griggs here.

I’ve been writing about the community of Turnabout, Texas for a while now, in fact my seventh book in the series will be out in December. Turnabout has become very real to me–I feel as if I’ve actually visited there, walked the streets, visited the shops and homes and chatted with a few of the townsfolk.

One of the spots in the town where nearly everyone stops in at one time or another, especially when they want to indulge in a special treat, is the Blue Bottle Sweet Shop and Tea Parlor. It’s  run by Eve Dawson, the heroine of A Family For Christmas.  One of Eve’s specialties is pumpkin seed brittle.

Since we’re moving into Autumn, a time of year when pumpkin seeds will be plentiful, I thought that, for my contribution to Recipe Week, I’d share a more modern (and spicy!) version of that recipe with you.

Spicy Pumpkin Seed Brittlepumpkin brittle

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 cups  shelled pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1 cup white granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon  unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • Optional:  1 tsp. cayenne pepper (or to taste)

 

Directions:

  • Generously grease a large baking sheet (18×12 or larger). Set aside.
  • If the seeds are already roasted skip this step and go on to the next.
    Place seeds in a medium- large skillet, then toast the pumpkin seeds over medium heat until lightly browned. Remove skillet from heat and set aside.
  • Mix the water, corn syrup, and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat, stirring constantly using a wooden spoon. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of the pan (do not allow it to touch the bottom of the pan).
  • Continue cooking without stirring, until the mixture reaches 285 degrees F (140 degrees C).
  • Add in the pumpkin seeds and the spices.  Continue to cook the mixture, stirring frequently to prevent the candy from scorching as well as to keep the seeds from sticking to the bottom of the pan, until the temperature reaches 300 degrees F  (149 degrees C).
  • (The brittle will foam up when the baking soda is added so be careful when performing this step) Remove the pan from heat and stir in the baking soda, vanilla, and butter.  Stir until everything is well mixed and the foaming settles.
  • Immediately pour the mixture onto the prepared baking sheet. If you want a thinner brittle, spread with a well-greased spatula.  The brittle will set quickly so you must work with haste
  • Let the brittle cool completely and then break into pieces.
  • Store in an airtight container or a plastic freezer bag in order to keep the brittle from becoming sticky.

Brittle will keep well at room temperature for up to two weeks.
Makes approximately 1.5 pounds.

 

So tell me, do you like a little heat with your sweet (like me!), or are you sweet all the way?

 

Winnie Griggs
Winnie Griggs is the author of Historical (and occasionally Contemporary) romances that focus on Small Towns, Big Hearts, Amazing Grace. She is also a list maker, a lover of dragonflies and holds an advanced degree in the art of procrastination.
Three of Winnie’s books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, and one of those nominations resulted in a win.
Winnie loves to hear from readers. You can connect with her on facebook at www.facebook.com/WinnieGriggs.Author or email her at winnie@winniegriggs.com.
Updated: October 1, 2015 — 5:25 pm

21 Comments

  1. Pumpkin seed brittle sounds really good

    1. That’s because it is 🙂

  2. Hi Winnie, I never heard of pumpkin seed brittle, but what a great idea for fall. I’m sweet all the way and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

    Hugs!

    1. Ah Margaret, methinks there is a bit of the spicy in you despite your words 🙂

  3. I have never heard of it before – but I think I would like it! I honestly have never tried the spicy chocolate before. I know there are many kinds out there. Pretty sure I would love it, though. 🙂

    1. Ah, spicy chocolate – love it!

  4. This sounds delicious Winnie! I have never tried a recipe with pumpkin seeds for the ingredients. Mostly I just toast them with a little oil and salt.

    1. They’re good that way too, but a bit of sweet never hurt anything 🙂

  5. I love pumpkin seeds so that sounds really good!

    1. Glad you like the sounds of it – let me know if you give it a try

  6. Different, sounds yummy.

  7. Did you see my eyes pop open to at least twice their normal size? I love nut brittles, but I’ve never thought about making pumpkin seed brittle. Now I can feed my brittle addiction with an entirely new flavor.

    You’re an enabler, you know that? 😀

    1. LOL Kathleen. Glad I gave you something to look forward to. If you like brittles I think you’re going to really enjoy this one!

  8. Winnie, I love this recipe! Thank you so much for sharing!

    1. You’re quite welcome! 🙂

  9. I’m sweet all the way! Hi Winnie and how exciting that this is your seventh book in the series from Turnabout, Texas. Blessings, Jenny

    1. Hi Jenny! Thanks for stopping by and for the kind words. And yes you ARE sweet!! 🙂

  10. I have a sweet tooth, but there have been times when little kicky sister makes pecan brittle that is wonderful. She dove hers in the microwave, faster and less of a mess. Will have to give this a try.

    1. Hi Patricia! Thanks for stopping by. I’m not a big fan of pecans but I’d love to know how your sister creates brittle in the microwave.

  11. Can’t believe the mistakes in my first post. It must have been late.

    I have done both peanut brittle and pecan brittle in the microwave. You use a large pyrex measuring cup, two quart size. Add the ingredients except for the vanilla and butter. Microwave for a few minutes, about 4. Take out, add vanilla and butter, stir and pour out onto a greased sheet. It is super quick and easy.
    Having said that, I must say that since getting our new microwave I have burned every batch I have made. It is a high powered one I guess. I have adjusted the times, but had no luck. I didn’t have that problem with the peanut brittle many years ago with a different microwave. Pecans are too expensive to keep ruining, so I just wait for my sister to send me some of her “Fairy Brittle.”

Comments are closed.