Noelle Marchand: The Iconic Texas Rangers

 

There are few archetypes in Western literature more appealing than the Texas Ranger. Men who wear the encircled star badge in romantic fiction are inevitably smart, courageous, physically fit and tough-as-nails. Taking into consideration that slow Texas drawl, wide brimmed cowboy hat and inherent southern charm…Well, it’s no wonder they’ve captured our imaginations from the very beginning which is saying something because the Texas Rangers got their start before there even was such a thing as Texas.

 

As settlers came pouring into the wide-skied and varied landscape that belonged to Mexico, it was

determined that a group of men was needed to enforce laws as well as keep the peace between settlers and the Indians native to the area. By 1835, Stephen F. Austin had organized a law enforcement force which he christened the “Rangers” and which the Mexicans soon called “los Diablos Tejanos”. Translation? The Texas Devils.

 

Then came the Texas revolution and after the revolution—statehood. While state industries boomed and immigrant flocked to the open range, the Texas Rangers became even more of a force to be reckoned with by succeeding where the federal army struggled in subduing a Comanche uprising. The Texas Rangers were disbanded during the Civil War but were soon needed again to maintain the safety of Texas citizens from outlaws and raiding Indians.

 

Where do these historical facts and literary romanticism meet? The reality of life as a Texas Ranger in 19th Century was not always a glamorous one as my hero finds out in A Texas-Made Match…..

 

Here’s an excerpt:

 

It had been a long, hard year filled with dangerous work and too many secrets. As a Texas Ranger, he’d rounded up more than his fair share of outlaws, and he tried to find some satisfaction in that. But this near vagabond existence was too much like the life he’d left behind when he’d stumbled into Peppin, Texas, abandoned and alone with nowhere to go until the O’Brien family took him in. A few months later, when he was fourteen, Doc and Lettie Williams adopted him. They’d been the parents he’d always dreamed of. His life in Peppin had been so good that he’d nearly forgotten about the past. Here…he seemed to run across it every day in the smell of liquor, the haunted eyes of the saloon girls, the solitude and the need to be on constant alert.

His commanding officer in the Rangers constantly told him not to lose the chip on his shoulder. “That’s what make you stand out from the other Rangers. That’s what makes you tough. That’s what enables you to get your man. Never lose that chip.”

Lawson wasn’t stupid enough to believe him. God was the one enabling him to catch those criminals. As for the chip on his shoulder—well, he reckoned he’d picked it up sometime between being abandoned and wandering into Peppin. Unfortunately, it didn’t keep the harshness of this life from wearing away at him, day by day.

 

Lawson returns to Peppin never suspecting he’s heading straight toward a reckoning with his past and

a new chance for a love-filled future. In doing so, he relinquishes the badge but not the honor that came with receiving the commission to serve, protect, and defend the people of Texas. It is a mission that the Texas Rangers carry out to this day. Their ability to do exactly that has ensured them a reputation in Western lore as big as the state they served.

Sources:

http://www.texasrangers.org

NOELLE IS GIVING AWAY A COPY OF “A TEXAS-MADE MATCH” TO ONE LUCKY COMMENTER.

m4s0n501

Written by Guest Blogger

Visit Guest Blogger's website


24 Comments on “Noelle Marchand: The Iconic Texas Rangers”

You can track this conversation through its atom feed.

  1. Connie J. says:

    I love reading about Texas Rangers and really enjoyed reading your blog. Thanks. Looking forward to reading A Texas Made Match!

  2. Maxie Anderson says:

    WOW! I love the westerns. The cover is pretty too. AND, I love Texas. I would love to win Noelle’s book. Thanks! Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

  3. anon1001 says:

    I can’t wait to read your book!

  4. Katie J. says:

    I would love to read this one. It looks great.

  5. Summer says:

    This sounds really good, I do love a hero with a chip on his shoulder.

  6. Cindy Woolard says:

    Good morning Noelle! I have been trying to sign on to P & P all morning but I kept receiving error messages. So glad I finally got through.

    First I want to say I have both of your first two books! I’m currently reading Unlawfully Wedded Bride and am truly enjoying it.

    Second I LOVE your last name…course I guess that is because it is my maiden name. My ancestry came out of a little German/French border town. I’ve always enjoyed other people who carry the name of Marchand. :)

    I would love to win a copy of your newest novel, A Texas Made Match. Thank you for the opportunity.

    Have a blessed day everyone!

    Smiles & Blessings,
    Cindy W.

  7. Linda Broday says:

    Hi Noelle! Welcome back to the Junction. We’re so happy to have you. We hope you enjoy your stay and come back to visit again real soon.

    Living here in Texas it’s easy to see why the famed Texas Rangers are so beloved and revered. They still represent the best of the best in law enforcement as they did in the 1800’s. Texas would’ve had a much harder time being settled without these brave men. If you’ve ever had a chance to tour the Texas Ranger Museum in Waco, you had a real treat. I’ve written a book and a novella that featured a Texas Ranger hero. They make excellent stories.

    Your new book looks great. Wishing you lots of success with it.

  8. Noelle Marchand says:

    Hey, y’all! Thank you so much for stopping by. Happy Texas Independence Day by the way! It’s an official holiday down here. lol. Who knew, right? Today in 1836, Texas Declared independence from Mexico and became its own Republic before angling for statehood.

    Connie, I’m so glad you enjoyed the blog post!

    Maxie, I love westerns, too! Best wishes in the drawing.

    Anon & Katie, thank you so much!

    Summer, heroes with chips on their shoulders provide some great writing material. Laughter and maybe a tear or two. What’s not to love?

    Cindy, I’m so glad you kept trying and that you’re enjoying my first two books! I hope you’ll let me know how you like them when you’re finished with them. How cool that we share a last name! My family hails from Louisiana so there’s definitely a common French heritage between us though mine is the creole variety. Best wishes in the giveaway!

    Linda, I’ve heard about that museum. I would love to tour it one day. Thanks for your recommendation. I’ll look for your novella.

  9. Renee Ryan says:

    Welcome, Noelle!!! What a great post. I love lawmen, any kind of lawmen. But those Texas Rangers are really, really special. Your book sounds fabulous!!!!

  10. Vickie Couturier says:

    Ive always enjoyed reading about the Texas rangers also,I love to read about any law enforcement,,my uncle was sheriff for our county for many years,my foster brother is a city police officer an my son in law just graduated from the police school an is now working for the county as the SRO officer at the high school,his sons are so proud of him as well as the rest of us,,so it runs deep in our family

  11. Vickie Couturier says:

    Ive always enjoyed reading about the Texas rangers also,I love to read about any law enforcement,,my uncle was sheriff for our county for many years,my foster brother is a city police officer an my son in law just graduated from the police school an is now working for the county as the SRO officer at the high school,his sons are so proud of him as well as the rest of us,,so it runs deep in our family..

  12. Sherry Allman says:

    I too had sign in problems. Loved your first two books can’t wait to read this one. Love to read about Texas Rangers.

  13. Mary J says:

    Sounds like a good one. Thanks for coming by this morning. I have always enjoyed a good Texas Ranger story.
    Mary J

  14. Janella says:

    Interesting post. I really enjoyed reading the first two books in the series.
    Thanks for the chance at the giveaway.

  15. Noelle Marchand says:

    Thanks, Renee!

    Wow, Vickie! That is definitely something to be proud of. I thank your family for their service.

    Sherry, I’m so glad you enjoyed my books! I hope you like this one even more.

    You’re welcome, Mary. Thank you for stopping by!

  16. Wendy Newcomb says:

    Great sounding book, love the cover. Thank you for the chance to win it.

    wfnren(at)aol(dot)com

  17. Colleen says:

    Your book has a beautiful cover! Thank you so much for sharing with us today Noelle! Enjoyed the post!

  18. Victoria Bylin says:

    Hi Noelle! Texas Rangers make wonderful heroes, and your excerpt has me hooked. Love the cover, too!

  19. Bekah says:

    Please do enter me! I love Noelle’s other books, and she is such a sweet girl :)

  20. Joye says:

    Enjoyed reading the comments. I am always looking for new authors to read. Your book sounds really good.

  21. Patricia B. says:

    Law enforcement always was and is today a special way of life. Some branches of it have developed their own mystique (well deserved) and the Texas Rangers are among those. They were a force to contend with. They worked in groups, but more often than not, it seems their life was a solitary existence. Your excerpt shows that and the effect it had on the individual.

    I had to smile at the cover of A TEXAS-MADE MATCH. It is not what most people think of when they think of Texas. But we visited a friend in Tyler, Texas, and it is very much like the cover. Best wishes for a successful release.

  22. Kim Cornwell says:

    I love anything western! Sounds like a great book! I am always look g for new reads and would love to win!

  23. Kathleen O says:

    I love books about Texas Rangers… Your books great and I would love to read it.

  24. Maria P says:

    There’s nothing like a western romance! Can’t wait to read your new book!

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>